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Triumph Torque  /  Herald/Vitesse  /  Paula's Vitesse!
Posted by: Paula, January 3, 2017, 6:46pm
Hi there.
I Just bought my first lovely Triumph (Vitesse) from Cornwall and set off for home in Streatham South London.
Unfortunately i haven't made it and i'm now in Sherborne in Dorset waiting for recovery with the RAC. The RAC patrol man said its a problem with the points and condensor and unfortunately they no longer carry those parts.
So hopefully by tomorrow i'll be back in South London with my new non starting car.
Does anyone know a mobile mechanic that could come out to Streatham and either fix my ignition or replace it for an electronic one?
Once the RAC drop it off it'll be stranded and i'm not confident enough to do the work myself yet, but i will be watching! (and making tea)
Hope someone can help?
Happy new year.
Paula.
New Member.
Posted by: iggy, January 3, 2017, 6:58pm; Reply: 1
you should be able to buy points condensor from quiller triumph in plumbsted white hart road may be if you call the rac again tomorrow they will fit them,
Posted by: Sienna PI, January 3, 2017, 7:05pm; Reply: 2
Hi Paula!
Pm sent to you!
Posted by: Paula, January 3, 2017, 7:06pm; Reply: 3
I've just seen Quiller have moved to Lewes. That's a shame.
Also just found out i haven't got the home recovery and it's costing me £300 to get taken home!
I'm sure i can find some points somewhere. I'm worried that's not the whole problem though.
I think i need a mobile mechanic or one that will come and pick the car up.

Posted by: Hogie, January 3, 2017, 7:08pm; Reply: 4
Hi Paula,
                rather than a mobile mechanic have you got any local garages (not the Merc and Audi ones). They can't do a runner, you know where they are,

Roger
Posted by: Paula, January 3, 2017, 7:21pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from Hogie
Hi Paula,
                rather than a mobile mechanic have you got any local garages (not the Merc and Audi ones). They can't do a runner, you know where they are,

Roger


There is a garage down the road, but i'm not sure how to get it to them. I'll pop around there for a chat tomorrow and then maybe get an electronic ignition fitted once i'm mobile again.
Posted by: Sienna PI, January 3, 2017, 7:27pm; Reply: 6
Hi Paula!

Another Pm for you!
Posted by: Nick Jones, January 3, 2017, 7:43pm; Reply: 7
Hmm, you must have passed about 1 mile from me about 15 miles before you ground to a halt........

Are you still there?

Nick
Posted by: DaveKent, January 3, 2017, 8:22pm; Reply: 8
Paula, have a chat with some club members before you splash out on electronic ignition ; there are quite a few different options for varying amounts of money. Be guided by the owners rather than swayed by the garage's preference.
Posted by: JohnD, January 3, 2017, 9:28pm; Reply: 9
Paula,
Welcome!  And so sorry you have had a traumatic entry to Triumph ownership!
I'd trust the RAC man - they still have long and deep enough experience to know about the "Kettering" system, in an age of wholly electronic ignition.
But points only last 3000-6000 miles, less if the condensor goes.

A set of points costs £3.10 plus P&P from Canley's: http://www.canleyclassics.com/triumph-vitesse-distributor-lucas-and-coil  (but make sure which distributor you have, Lucas or Delco)
And order two!   At that price it's worth carrying in the glove box for peace of mind.

But you need to know how to change it.
That's where your local group can help, because any of then could demonstrate how, and get you to practice it, in the meeting pub's car park (given good weather)
Find them in the headline of this page - The Club/Local Groups
But home work first!   This no-nonsense Aussie video show how, not on a Triumph, but all distributors have points, unless they have been converted:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9wZvcr3v2c

And may I recommend - for any electrical problem, a multimeter is an invaluable tool, and need cost less than £10: https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=multimeter

John
Posted by: RobPearce, January 3, 2017, 9:55pm; Reply: 10
Paula,
Sorry to hear you've had a bad start to your Triumph adventures, but don't panic. John's advice is good, as is Dave's. With luck you may get some garage recommendations from a local member. If you were in Stretham rather than Streatham I'd offer to pop round and help but London's a bit far :-/
Posted by: Paula, January 3, 2017, 11:10pm; Reply: 11
Hi!
Sorry for the big gap.
I was getting the car loaded onto the truck and then i was off!
I really will learn how to do my own. I'll order them asap!
More bad news though... As i was turning the steering wheel, something popped out and i now have massive amounts of play in the steering!
I think i would feel better if i got someone to give it a dam good service and check it all over to give me a good starting point.
Maybe Quiller?
Posted by: Paula, January 3, 2017, 11:15pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from Nick Jones
Hmm, you must have passed about 1 mile from me about 15 miles before you ground to a halt........

Are you still there?

Nick


Sorry Nick. I should have posted this earlier!
Posted by: JohnD, January 3, 2017, 11:25pm; Reply: 13
Paula,
You sound willing and able to do some maintenance for yourself.
A workshop manual will make doing it, and explaining from you to us and vice versa, easier.
"Something popped out" and lots of play, could be the sliding impact clamp in the steering column.  It was a very early bit of safety in design, to stop the steering column spearing you in a crash.
The solid lower column slides in the the hollow upper part of the column, under the dashboard.
See this diagram from Canley Classics, who you may get to know well:  http://www.canleyclassics.com/triumph-vitesse-steering  Parts 7-10

Turn the steering wheel, while watching the column in the engine bay.    If the play is between the two parts, it's the impact joint that needs to be reset.

John
Posted by: Paula, January 3, 2017, 11:37pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from JohnD
Paula,
You sound willing and able to do some maintenance for yourself.
A workshop manual will make doing it, and explaining from you to us and vice versa, easier.
"Something popped out" and lots of play, could be the sliding impact clamp in the steering column.  It was a very early bit of safety in design, to stop the steering column spearing you in a crash.
The solid lower column slides in the the hollow upper part of the column, under the dashboard.
See this diagram from Canley Classics, who you may get to know well:  http://www.canleyclassics.com/triumph-vitesse-steering  Parts 7-10

Turn the steering wheel, while watching the column in the engine bay.    If the play is between the two parts, it's the impact joint that needs to be reset.

John


Ok. I'll have a look tomorrow morning when (hopefully) the car arrives on the truck.
I have the Lindsey Porter and Peter Williams book.
I'll get a Haynes too.
I've done some stuff in the past including a head gasket on my old MIni and The Radiator on my Nissan Figaro. I've also done the brake pads and shoes on drum and disk brakes and a CV joint.
Still very much an amature though!
Posted by: Paula, January 3, 2017, 11:45pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from JohnD
Paula,
You sound willing and able to do some maintenance for yourself.
A workshop manual will make doing it, and explaining from you to us and vice versa, easier.
"Something popped out" and lots of play, could be the sliding impact clamp in the steering column.  It was a very early bit of safety in design, to stop the steering column spearing you in a crash.
The solid lower column slides in the the hollow upper part of the column, under the dashboard.
See this diagram from Canley Classics, who you may get to know well:  http://www.canleyclassics.com/triumph-vitesse-steering  Parts 7-10

Turn the steering wheel, while watching the column in the engine bay.    If the play is between the two parts, it's the impact joint that needs to be reset.

John


Those parts with the R type clip.
Are they in the engine side of the bulk head?
Posted by: mikeyb, January 4, 2017, 8:16am; Reply: 16
There have been a few posts on here (and on some other forums) that would imply that an element of caution may be prudent if thinking about dealing with Quiller - do your homework!

You will find plenty of recommendations from satisfied customers of other Triumph Specialists on here.  I for one would suggest Moordale Motors, advert at top of page - Dale is a top man and very active within the Club!
Posted by: JohnD, January 4, 2017, 8:24am; Reply: 17
Paula,
Sorry, the diagram does need interpreting!

The 'R-clip' is a wire (45) to hold the steering rack gaiter (43) onto the rack body.  On the car about three feet from the clamp, but the diagram doesn't make that clear!
The impact clamp is on the driver side of the bulkhead.

This page from Canley's is of the late Spitfire steering column, but that used the same impact clamp, and the diagram is clearer.    
The clamp itself is in the  bottom left hand corner, 122669,  a U-shaped part sits around the tubular upper column, with a flat cross-piece (125782)bolted to it.
The cross piece sits in a slot in the tube.
The lower column rod slides into the tube, and has a flat section.   A 'grub-screw' (125781), a bolt that is driven in with an Allen key (hexagonal tool), onto the flat to do the clamping, and is locked by a lock nut (JN2110).

If the screw has become loose then there will be excess play in the steering, as the upper tube turns until the screw hits the flat.

To adjust, undo the lock nut, tighten the screw, check that the play is removed and tighten the lock nut.   Easy!  Except you do it upside down, head under the dashboard with a torch in your teeth!   It's simple, but very awkward to do!

So do the test I suggested before you try to find the clamp.  There are other possibilities, but best take remote diagnosis step-by-step!
If you can contact your local group and ask their help, someone on the spot could run through them rather quickly.
Regret that I'm 200+ miles away.

John
PS I missed your first reply at the bottom of page 1!   Forgive me - you certainly are "able to do some maintenance yourself"!   My apologies!  J.
Posted by: Bitumen Boy, January 4, 2017, 10:27am; Reply: 18
Plenty of good advice here, but another couple of pointers wouldn't go amiss.

1. The grubscrew on the steering column impact clamp is an imperial rather than metric size - 3/16 AF, iirc. It's about the only one on the whole car barring some on the diff which are the same size anyway, so if you can find anyone selling a single 3/16 AF Allen key (aka hex key) rather than a full set, that's the way to go.

2. When it comes to buying a workshop manual, the older editions of Haynes etc. explain things much better than the more recent ones which have been somewhat "dumbed down". Don't turn your nose up at a battered, oily-finger-marked example on fleabay as it'll probably serve you better than a clean new one.

Have fun!
Posted by: Dannyb, January 4, 2017, 11:01am; Reply: 19
[quote=MikeyB]There have been a few posts on here (and on some other forums) that would imply that an element of caution may be prudent if thinking about dealing with Quiller - do your homework!

Quiller have moved down to the south coast Lewes I believe.
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, January 4, 2017, 11:49am; Reply: 20
Quoted from Bitumen Boy
1. The grubscrew on the steering column impact clamp is an imperial rather than metric size - 3/16 AF, iirc. It's about the only one on the whole car barring some on the diff which are the same size anyway, so if you can find anyone selling a single 3/16 AF Allen key (aka hex key) rather than a full set, that's the way to go.


Paula, if it is the impact clamp do NOT touch the grub screw and locking nut - this is what provides the pre-load on the column IIRC, adjusting this should be avoided unless you know the settings! The clamp often comes loose because when people fit it they do not seat it correctly on the flat sections of both the inner and outer columns. Indeed, a few years ago someone took a reasonably nicely restored Vitesse to KD Triumph where I was working at the time, complaining the steering occasionally felt vague (He'd restored the car himself). I dived straight into the footwell and sure enough the clamp was tightened up 'on the piss'. I removed it with the two 1/4"UNF bolts (7/16" head) and reseated the clamp on the flats correctly. No more vague steering.



Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2017, 1:30pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from JohnD
Paula,
Sorry, the diagram does need interpreting!

The 'R-clip' is a wire (45) to hold the steering rack gaiter (43) onto the rack body.  On the car about three feet from the clamp, but the diagram doesn't make that clear!
The impact clamp is on the driver side of the bulkhead.

This page from Canley's is of the late Spitfire steering column, but that used the same impact clamp, and the diagram is clearer.    
The clamp itself is in the  bottom left hand corner, 122669,  a U-shaped part sits around the tubular upper column, with a flat cross-piece (125782)bolted to it.
The cross piece sits in a slot in the tube.
The lower column rod slides into the tube, and has a flat section.   A 'grub-screw' (125781), a bolt that is driven in with an Allen key (hexagonal tool), onto the flat to do the clamping, and is locked by a lock nut (JN2110).

If the screw has become loose then there will be excess play in the steering, as the upper tube turns until the screw hits the flat.

To adjust, undo the lock nut, tighten the screw, check that the play is removed and tighten the lock nut.   Easy!  Except you do it upside down, head under the dashboard with a torch in your teeth!   It's simple, but very awkward to do!

So do the test I suggested before you try to find the clamp.  There are other possibilities, but best take remote diagnosis step-by-step!
If you can contact your local group and ask their help, someone on the spot could run through them rather quickly.
Regret that I'm 200+ miles away.

John
PS I missed your first reply at the bottom of page 1!   Forgive me - you certainly are "able to do some maintenance yourself"!   My apologies!  J.


That's great!
It's definitely that clamp. I'm going out there now to have a go.
I think i understand that it's a clamp that clamps around the end of a hollow shaft with a grub screw on it that is tightened down onto a flat part of an inner shaft.
I'll leave the grub screw as it is and try and reset the clamp into the correct position.
I've also ordered all new ignition bits including points condensor cap and rotor arm. That'll be tomorrow's fun!
What's the gap for the points? 0.015?
Cheers!
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2017, 2:13pm; Reply: 22
I tightened the 2 clamp bolts and everything is much better! I was tempted to tighten the grub screw, but i'll leave it for now. The clamp is very close to a part of the body and knocks against it occasionally though.
I'll see what it's like on the road hopefully tomorrow.
I was hoping for some driving around before i ended up this involved.
The joys of classic motoring i suppose!
Cheers for the amazing help, i'm sure you'll be hearing from me again and i'll try and make the next local meeting
Paula
Posted by: mikeyb, January 4, 2017, 2:27pm; Reply: 23
points 14-16 thou, plugs 25 thou
Posted by: Steve P, January 4, 2017, 4:23pm; Reply: 24
I work in the West End every day so if your stuck i would be happy to jump on the tube and take a look sometime,ive owned my Vitesse since 1985.
Steve
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2017, 5:16pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from Steve P
I work in the West End every day so if your stuck i would be happy to jump on the tube and take a look sometime,ive owned my Vitesse since 1985.
Steve


Amazing.
Thanks
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2017, 5:16pm; Reply: 26
Quoted from mikeyb
points 14-16 thou, plugs 25 thou


Perfect. Ta!
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2017, 5:20pm; Reply: 27
Quoted from Jonny-Jimbo


Paula, if it is the impact clamp do NOT touch the grub screw and locking nut - this is what provides the pre-load on the column IIRC, adjusting this should be avoided unless you know the settings! The clamp often comes loose because when people fit it they do not seat it correctly on the flat sections of both the inner and outer columns. Indeed, a few years ago someone took a reasonably nicely restored Vitesse to KD Triumph where I was working at the time, complaining the steering occasionally felt vague (He'd restored the car himself). I dived straight into the footwell and sure enough the clamp was tightened up 'on the piss'. I removed it with the two 1/4"UNF bolts (7/16" head) and reseated the clamp on the flats correctly. No more vague steering.





Thanks!
I think i got it square.
I actually think it was all upside down! as the steering wheel is now the wrong way up???
Posted by: JohnD, January 4, 2017, 5:34pm; Reply: 28
Quoted from Jonny-Jimbo


Paula, if it is the impact clamp do NOT touch the grub screw and locking nut - this is what provides the pre-load on the column IIRC, adjusting this should be avoided unless you know the settings! The clamp often comes loose because when people fit it they do not seat it correctly on the flat sections of both the inner and outer columns. Indeed, a few years ago someone took a reasonably nicely restored Vitesse to KD Triumph where I was working at the time, complaining the steering occasionally felt vague (He'd restored the car himself). I dived straight into the footwell and sure enough the clamp was tightened up 'on the piss'. I removed it with the two 1/4"UNF bolts (7/16" head) and reseated the clamp on the flats correctly. No more vague steering.





JJ,
what's special about the impact clamp's grub screw, that it should NOT be touched?

The OE Workshop Manual describes the procedure as follows:
Retighten the bolts on the impact clamp.
Using a socket key [aka Allen key JD] tighten the screw ... by hand as much as possible without bending the the wrench [aka key]
Tighten the lock nut.

Done in that order - Simples!!

And the wheel - ditto!  
Just undo that enormous nut, but leave it on the thread.
While pulling the wheel upwards, HIT the top of the column, with a soft hammer, or a hard one with a pieceof wood in the way.
With luck, the wheel will spring off its splines, you can turn it around and replace it.

John
Posted by: Sheepy, January 4, 2017, 5:49pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from Bitumen Boy
, oily-finger-marked example on fleabay as it'll probably serve you better than a clean new one.

Have fun!


Couldn't agree more, the older ones are the best.

If you can do a head gasket then you are a lot further advanced than most amateurs!
Find a local club and get chatting to some of the members with the same car (helps if they know that model well) or others that are good with spanners (as most triumph owners should be 😉) then ask for advice, or even ask if they would be willing to teach you (payment of tea and biscuits, or beer??)
It's the best way to learn, then you will have the satisfaction of doing it yourself.

I would offer but I'm a little far away! 😀

Give the car a good check over now noting anything that needs replacing or is likely to need replacing soon, get along to the spares day in Feb if you have the time (19th) and pick up some bits, plus then you get to meet some orrible lot like us! But it's a fun day out.

Cheers
Shaun
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2017, 5:58pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from Sheepy


Couldn't agree more, the older ones are the best.

If you can do a head gasket then you are a lot further advanced than most amateurs!
Find a local club and get chatting to some of the members with the same car (helps if they know that model well) or others that are good with spanners (as most triumph owners should be 😉) then ask for advice, or even ask if they would be willing to teach you (payment of tea and biscuits, or beer??)
It's the best way to learn, then you will have the satisfaction of doing it yourself.

I would offer but I'm a little far away! 😀

Give the car a good check over now noting anything that needs replacing or is likely to need replacing soon, get along to the spares day in Feb if you have the time (19th) and pick up some bits, plus then you get to meet some orrible lot like us! But it's a fun day out.

Cheers
Shaun


I'll stick it in the diary!
Posted by: citroentim, January 4, 2017, 6:49pm; Reply: 31
Hi Paula
I am only 15 miles from you and happy to pop over and help with either fitting new points and condenser or electronic ignition if you don't have any luck with someone closer..
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2017, 6:52pm; Reply: 32
Quoted from citroentim
Hi Paula
I am only 15 miles from you and happy to pop over and help with either fitting new points and condenser or electronic ignition if you don't have any luck with someone closer..


Thanks!
I'll give it a go and see what happens. Parts should be here tomorrow.
Posted by: Nick Jones, January 4, 2017, 7:41pm; Reply: 33
Well done for having a go.  These cars are truly excellent for learning on, being really pretty simple.  I find it fairly horrifying that an RAC/AA person wasn't able to fettle a set of points at the roadside.

The lesson is to carry a few basic spares.  Points, condenser, rotor arm, set of plugs (the old but working ones removed from your last service are better than nothing) plus fan belt (make sure it is the right length by fitting the new one and keeping the one that comes off as the spare), top and bottom main hoses plus a length of generic 1/2" heater hose makes a good start.  Even if you can't fit them yourself it gives the RAC/AA man something to do.

Cheers

Nick

PS. When you have it running again and are confident you've fixed the steering issue, I still suggest taking the car to somewhere like Moordale Motors for a good, specialist look over just to make sure there's nothing too alarming lurking on the safety front.  That steering issue does suggest it's been fiddled with by someone not entirely sure what they were doing and you were quite fortunate to discover it the way you did!
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2017, 7:53pm; Reply: 34
Quoted from Nick Jones
Well done for having a go.  These cars are truly excellent for learning on, being really pretty simple.  I find it fairly horrifying that an RAC/AA person wasn't able to fettle a set of points at the roadside.

The lesson is to carry a few basic spares.  Points, condenser, rotor arm, set of plugs (the old but working ones removed from your last service are better than nothing) plus fan belt (make sure it is the right length by fitting the new one and keeping the one that comes off as the spare), top and bottom main hoses plus a length of generic 1/2" heater hose makes a good start.  Even if you can't fit them yourself it gives the RAC/AA man something to do.

Cheers

Nick

PS. When you have it running again and are confident you've fixed the steering issue, I still suggest taking the car to somewhere like Moordale Motors for a good, specialist look over just to make sure there's nothing too alarming lurking on the safety front.  That steering issue does suggest it's been fiddled with by someone not entirely sure what they were doing and you were quite fortunate to discover it the way you did!


I'll start building up on spares.
I used to carry so many around on my old vespa i once called out the RAC and just asked to borrow some tools as i'd left them at home. Poor guy had no idea how to do a clutch cable on a 1960 VBA 150!
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2017, 8:00pm; Reply: 35
I'm planning to take it to Quillers for a once over once i'm on the road
Posted by: DaveKent, January 4, 2017, 8:09pm; Reply: 36
Dale at Moordale is your man!
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2017, 8:11pm; Reply: 37
Quoted from DaveKent
Dale at Moordale is your man!


Oh ok.
I'll give him a call. Quillers not so hot?
Posted by: Alex, January 4, 2017, 8:43pm; Reply: 38
Quoted from Paula


Oh ok.
I'll give him a call. Quillers not so hot?



There have been many less than favourable reviews about quillers......I'm sure they can't be all bad but the general opinion would be the one I'd favour......

Was that diplomatic?
Posted by: DaveKent, January 4, 2017, 8:47pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from Paula


Oh ok.
I'll give him a call. Quillers not so hot?


To be fair, I have never used Quiller: however I do know first hand that Moordale Dale knows his Triumphs inside out!
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2017, 9:13pm; Reply: 40
Message received and understood!
Posted by: timbancroft61, January 4, 2017, 9:48pm; Reply: 41
Blimey, Chandler is learning.....never too old eh!
Posted by: Alex, January 4, 2017, 10:03pm; Reply: 42
Quoted from timbancroft61
Blimey, Chandler is learning.....never too old eh!


;D
Posted by: TedTaylor, January 5, 2017, 12:56am; Reply: 43
You have a number of local Club groups in South London like South London and West Kent.  Use the 'More Local Groups' option at the bottom of the 'Next Group Meetings' on the right of the page which gives map locations.

MUT
Posted by: RobPearce, January 5, 2017, 8:48am; Reply: 44
Quoted from Nick Jones
I find it fairly horrifying that an RAC/AA person wasn't able to fettle a set of points at the roadside.

These days I'm not surprised. Some twenty years ago I broke down in a Dolomite 1850 and the RAC/AA/etc person who attended managed only to completely a£$e up the distributor before being forced to give up and call a recovery truck.

Quoted from Nick Jones
PS. When you have it running again and are confident you've fixed the steering issue, I still suggest taking the car to somewhere like Moordale Motors for a good, specialist look over

As others have said, Dale at Moordale is the man! Not being local, I don't use them myself, but it was he who fixed my very unhappy Toledo in a car park in Scotland on the 2008 RBRR.
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, January 5, 2017, 8:49am; Reply: 45
I think Mr Alex was 'diplomatic' on the RBRR too - must be mellowing in his old age.

JohnD - my point on the clamp was that to fit it correctly it is clamped and located by the two 1/4UNF bolts, NOT by the grub screw as that sets the preload. So the information given of fiddling with the locknut wouldn't have helped Paula in her situation.

Paula, glad you're getting it sorted, and as has been said by others, the work you have said you've done on your previous car is beyond the average beginner, so at the least you must be an advanced amateur  ;). As has been said Dale's a good guy and active in the club too - I'm up in the Triumph Homeland, so I have not used his services myself, but generally with garages etc you can take the majority vote as a good sign.
Posted by: JohnD, January 5, 2017, 9:29am; Reply: 46
JJ,
Disagree - read my post 28, where I copied the instruction from the original manual on how to secure the steering column impact clamp.

The tightness of the grub screw is determined by tightening that, NOT the two bolts that secure the clamp on the column.
And the original instructions specifically say, that the grub screw should be hand tight, without bending the Allen key (I paraphrase).

This is exactly NOT what you suggest.
When two "experts"  (has beens, under pressure) are so diametrically opposed, perhaps the Court of CT should decide!
John
Posted by: RobPearce, January 5, 2017, 10:07am; Reply: 47
John/Jon,
I think probably you are talking at cross purposes. JD's point is that setting the grub screw is not hard and should be done if it's suspect. JJ's point is that it's rare for that to be the cause of the problem and much more common for people to simply fit the whole shebang wrong, in which case the other two bolts are the ones you need to deal with. Indeed, I think JJ is emphasising that, given the requirement to set the grub screw correctly, where the other two nuts are simply "done up tight", it is only sensible to release the easy ones, check it's all fitted right and re-tighten, then test, before contemplating the slightly more complex bit. And, while I haven't re-checked the workshop manual for a long time, I do recall it containing a statement that the grub screw should not be disturbed (when removing the clamp or adjusting the reach) for precisely the reason JJ gives.
I gather from the thread that Paula has done as JJ suggested and found that he was right and this was, indeed, the problem. Had there still been a problem now, JD's advice would be the correct next step (and I think JJ would agree here).

(now we need eleven more "court of CT" jury members to chime in ;) )
Posted by: Hogie, January 5, 2017, 10:10am; Reply: 48
Hi Paula,
             if you think getting to Moordale's (North London) may be too demanding there is Enginuity in Acton and Rees Brothers in Aldershot.
They are both well into TRiumphs.

But don;t forget to investigate a sympathetic garage near to you.

Roger
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, January 5, 2017, 10:42am; Reply: 49
Thanks Rob - as usual other people can say what I'm trying to far better than I can. I have never been the most eloquent or the most proficient at writing. I know what I mean but struggle to convey it. To me Rob has covered what I was trying to say. You may disagree.

Paula, as Hogie has said, there is Enginuity; I went to view a car they were selling a few years back and they seemed like a reasonable bunch of guys. My other halfs family are in Ealing and another buddy is down by Kempton Park; I'll keep an eye out for your Vitesse when I'm down there!
Posted by: Paula, January 5, 2017, 1:14pm; Reply: 50
Update!
I've changed: Plugs, Point, Condenser, Rotor, Distro Cap, Plugs, Leads and coil.
It started straight away and was running lovely. I sat in it idling with the heater running and after 10 mins it started running lumpy and died.
I tried to restart it, but the battery was flat.
I've pulled a plug out and it's very black.
I'm now charging the battery up so i can try again.
Any ideas?
I was so pleased for 10 mins!!
Thanks.
Paula
Posted by: Nick Jones, January 5, 2017, 1:45pm; Reply: 51
Did you put the choke in?  Is the choke fully disengaging?

Always worth re-checking points gap also as they do sometimes close up quite quick when new.  Flat battery and no charging at idle might not have been helping either.  Can be an issue with dynamos as they tend not to produce much, if any juice at idle speeds.  If you see lots of sitting in traffic with lights/wipers/blower on in your future an alternator conversion might be a good investment?

I also notice you have a Delco distributor (Vitesse 1600 presumably) and when trying to make one good one of these from the tatty remains of two last weekend for my sons Spitfire I noticed that one had a very scored and rough surface to the cams which would tend to cause accelerated wear to the heel of the points - might be worth a quick check.

Nick
Posted by: Paula, January 5, 2017, 2:00pm; Reply: 52
Just tried again with the battery now charged enough. Not firing at all. Just like before. The points gap if fine.
Funny how it seems to run great after it's been left alone for a while and then just goes lumpy and stops after 10 mins. Could it be the plugs oiling up? They are black but not that wet. But hey went black from new in 10 mins. Isn't that odd? The choke seems to work fine.
Posted by: RobPearce, January 5, 2017, 2:17pm; Reply: 53
Well... ten minutes from cold with choke might cause a fair bit of soot build-up, though I'd expect it to be thin and easily wiped off.
How well charged is the battery? Tessa will happily crank over with no sign of any ignition for a fair while if the battery is only part-charged. Put in back on charge for a couple of hours and she'll burst into life on the first turn of the key.
What plugs have you got? Some people have said that modern NGK plugs, in particular, 'fail' very quickly if the engine is running rich. I'd be surprised if they went that quickly, though.
Also, there are a lot of dodgy rotor arms out there. It may be worth swapping the old one back in for a test. Likewise the cap & leads, if the arm doesn't help.
Posted by: Paula, January 5, 2017, 2:20pm; Reply: 54
Quoted from RobPearce
Well... ten minutes from cold with choke might cause a fair bit of soot build-up, though I'd expect it to be thin and easily wiped off.
How well charged is the battery? Tessa will happily crank over with no sign of any ignition for a fair while if the battery is only part-charged. Put in back on charge for a couple of hours and she'll burst into life on the first turn of the key.
What plugs have you got? Some people have said that modern NGK plugs, in particular, 'fail' very quickly if the engine is running rich. I'd be surprised if they went that quickly, though.
Also, there are a lot of dodgy rotor arms out there. It may be worth swapping the old one back in for a test. Likewise the cap & leads, if the arm doesn't help.


Ok. I'll get the battery back on charge. There is a garage down the road (down hill too!) i might just get it going and get it to them.
Posted by: Paula, January 5, 2017, 2:23pm; Reply: 55
These plugs
http://www.rimmerbros.co.uk/Item--i-GSP4382
Posted by: Paula, January 5, 2017, 2:32pm; Reply: 56
Quoted from RobPearce
Well... ten minutes from cold with choke might cause a fair bit of soot build-up, though I'd expect it to be thin and easily wiped off.
How well charged is the battery? Tessa will happily crank over with no sign of any ignition for a fair while if the battery is only part-charged. Put in back on charge for a couple of hours and she'll burst into life on the first turn of the key.
What plugs have you got? Some people have said that modern NGK plugs, in particular, 'fail' very quickly if the engine is running rich. I'd be surprised if they went that quickly, though.
Also, there are a lot of dodgy rotor arms out there. It may be worth swapping the old one back in for a test. Likewise the cap & leads, if the arm doesn't help.


Your comment about having a fully charged battery has made me think. When i picked the car up they were charging the battery. Maybe that is the fault. Maybe it'll only go with a 100% charged battery?
I'll charge it for another hour and try again, then i have to go out.
Posted by: glang, January 5, 2017, 3:12pm; Reply: 57
It does sound very much like too much choke which you could check by taking the air filter box off the carbs - they look like strombergs to me so you should see a bar at the bottom of each intake that rotates as the choke is operated. When the choke is off the bars should have their flat sides on top so that they are flush with the intake bore....
Posted by: Paula, January 5, 2017, 3:25pm; Reply: 58
Quoted from glang
It does sound very much like too much choke which you could check by taking the air filter box off the carbs - they look like strombergs to me so you should see a bar at the bottom of each intake that rotates as the choke is operated. When the choke is off the bars should have their flat sides on top so that they are flush with the intake bore....


Here's 2 pictures. First one is choke off and second is on
Posted by: Paula, January 5, 2017, 3:46pm; Reply: 59
Just tried again and it ran very badly for 30 seconds and died again.
I'll have to stop for today and try again tomorrow
Posted by: daver clasper, January 5, 2017, 6:04pm; Reply: 60
Hi

The second photo looks different, as though the choke bar may be lifting the piston and needle for more fuel (as it would if choke is pulled out), though it's proberely the angle of photo.

If not on choke then then the bar is not in contact with the piston and piston should be resting on the bridge/body of carb (also the bars should move together, so check the clamp connecting them is not loose)  .

If running rich and mixture screw/jet is set right (though hard to determine if over fueling for another reason) then other main reasons for over fueling are sticking needle valve. punctured float, or floats set too high (though last one unlikely if was running well before).

You maybe know this stuff, though, thought I would mention it.

Cars that have not been used much or neglected a bit with maintenance can need a bit of de- bugging.
  

Good luck with it.

Dave
Posted by: glang, January 5, 2017, 6:18pm; Reply: 61
well the choke looks like its working perfectly in your pics, did the other carb behave the same? While you've got the airfilter housing off you could try lifting each of the pistons that you can see and let them drop back down - there should be resistance to lifting due to the damping oil in the top of the carbs then they should drop back down smoothly and positively.
I do wonder about your battery/dynamo cos normally if theres enough ummmmph to start, the engine will run ok with the dynamo supplying the system. The battery certainly shouldnt go flat after a failed start or two and of course once started the ignition light should go out.....  
Posted by: daver clasper, January 5, 2017, 6:29pm; Reply: 62
Sorry. just re read. At first, thought pics were of both carbs with choke off
Posted by: Dogsbody47uk, January 5, 2017, 8:47pm; Reply: 63
Quoted from JohnD
JJ,
Disagree - read my post 28, where I copied the instruction from the original manual on how to secure the steering column impact clamp.

The tightness of the grub screw is determined by tightening that, NOT the two bolts that secure the clamp on the column.
And the original instructions specifically say, that the grub screw should be hand tight, without bending the Allen key (I paraphrase).

This is exactly NOT what you suggest.
When two "experts"  (has beens, under pressure) are so diametrically opposed, perhaps the Court of CT should decide!
John

Ok. Its a bit off thread. Loosen the grub screw. Locate the shaft flat bit, tighten the 2 nuts/ bolts to correctly align the shafts. Tighten the grub screw to lock the sliding shafts. Tighten the grub screw lock nut. Simple! :)
Posted by: Saltddirk, January 6, 2017, 6:42am; Reply: 64
Cant see from the pick which carb that is, nor do i know a lot about Vitesses,
but when you pushed the choke in, did the needle resit correctly? Feel underneath the carb if there is a piece of red plastic just push it upwards, it might just spring up seating the needles correctly. This happened fairly often on my spit with SU's, other versions might have different set up,  Sorry that I  am not very confident (or convincing if you want)  in explaining what to look for without having the thing in front of me....
Joys of classic motoring!
D
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2017, 1:20pm; Reply: 65
I'm a little scared of carbs, to many little bits! Something i have to get over.
I'll go and have another look with your comments in mind.
I have noticed a bit of a leak on the right hand carb.
Posted by: Nick Jones, January 6, 2017, 3:02pm; Reply: 66
Another possibility is that the needle valves inside the carbs are leaking a bit so the float chamber level increases.  This will make the car run rich even if the choke is off.  This shows up much more at idle as the engine takes least fuel so the rate of leakage exceeds rate of use.

If it's a small leak then it'll just make the car run rich at idle after a few minutes, if bigger them it will go on to flood out of the overflow drilling on the front face of the carb and into the airfilter.

This is a fairly common Stromberg CD foible and can be due to just tired needle valves, dirt or excessive fuel pressure from a dodgy modern replacement pump.

The Strombergs are the very early ones (as would be expected on a 1600) with a rather primitive choke arrangement - but they are also the simplest.

Nick
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2017, 3:17pm; Reply: 67
I think that's it!
The right carb is wet on the bottom.
I've driven it to the garage down the road after looking at it for a long time with a screwdriver in my hand.
I bottled it.. I used to clean the jet on my vespa on the side of the road regularly.
Oh the shame.
Please don't drum me out of the club!
Thanks again for all the help!
Haynes manual bought on ebay!
Posted by: TedTaylor, January 6, 2017, 3:57pm; Reply: 68
Quoted from Paula
Please don't drum me out of the club!
Thanks again for all the help!
Haynes manual bought on ebay!


Actually I think most of us following this thread admire you for being prepared to give sorting your problems a go!

MUT
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2017, 4:24pm; Reply: 69
Quoted from TedTaylor


Actually I think most of us following this thread admire you for being prepared to give sorting your problems a go!

MUT


Thanks!
The feeling i got when it fired straight away after fitting the new ignition was pretty sweet.
Still a few jobs to do, but we have bonded.
No regrets. (yet)
Posted by: glang, January 6, 2017, 4:40pm; Reply: 70
Quoted from Paula


Thanks!
The feeling i got when it fired straight away after fitting the new ignition was pretty sweet.
Still a few jobs to do, but we have bonded.
No regrets. (yet)


Watch out for that! Ive had my Vitesse 30years and talk to it now(ondrugs)
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2017, 4:46pm; Reply: 71
Oh oh
Posted by: Dogsbody47uk, January 6, 2017, 5:15pm; Reply: 72
I always talk to my Triumphs... especially when they've drawn blood...ungrateful little Bs!
Posted by: RobPearce, January 6, 2017, 5:26pm; Reply: 73
I talk to mine, too.

Tessa also had problems with the float valve on the front (right hand) carb after I fitted a new fuel pump. It is a common problem, leading to really poor running just like you've found. Tessa's wasn't bad enough to stop her completely but possibly only because the affected carb was set rather on the lean side.

It's great that you've (hopefully) identified the problem and can get the garage to fix it.
Posted by: daver clasper, January 6, 2017, 6:28pm; Reply: 74
Hi

From my experience, if it's wet at the bottom only (just the jet holder) then larger O ring between jet holder and float bowl failed, or small O ring between jet and jet holder. I think this is just leakage rather than flooding.

Float bowl gasket leakage will show fuel from below the float bowl gasket and would not be cause it's flooded.

Needle valves sticking or not seating has shown fuel sitting on the bridge (where the piston sits), though more extreme flooding it will come through the upper hole (breather/overflow?)on the right hand on front face of carb.

Had some experience with flooding on my vitesse, though not an expert mechanic at all. Aside from the springs etc around the spindles which are a bit more fiddly (take photos, refer to diagrams) which you don't have to tamper with to sort flooding and most things, earlier Strombergs are very simple with very few parts.

Good info on the web about them.

Hopefully not overloaded you with info.

Cheers, Dave



Posted by: efp, January 6, 2017, 8:25pm; Reply: 75
Paula

A propos of a much earlier post of yours, that looks like an original bakelite steering wheel.

I'm not a Vitesse man, maybe Vits are different but I know that for early Spits those are quite hard to come by, for those seeking originality.  Theres one being hawked on the Bay of Evil for £300 I believe. Seems the first mods every new owner did in the past were changing the wheel to a smaller sporty one, alloy rocker cover and a pair of K&N's. Must have added at least 0.005bhp.. and the originals went in the skip.

Please dont think of changing it.

J
Posted by: Sheepy, January 6, 2017, 8:27pm; Reply: 76
Quoted from Paula
I'm a little scared of carbs, to many little bits!


No, not at all! 😉
Posted by: RedRooster, January 6, 2017, 8:38pm; Reply: 77
Your going to loose the lot & be in a heap of woe when they slide off that table & go bouncing around the garage ;)

ps
don't know who your mason is but his pointing is rubbish.
Posted by: Sheepy, January 6, 2017, 9:50pm; Reply: 78
Ha ha I knew someone would notice the bricks! It's an old barn on the side of the house, think they just threw it together.  ;D

That carb is back together and running sweetly now, all new jets and screws fitted, but re used one of the original gaskets and the accelerator pump because the new rebuild kits are c**p, the original 70 year old parts were in better condition and fitted better than the "new" parts.

But anyway, Paula, give it a go. As long as you lay it out all neatly and take pictures, plus have a workshop manual to go by then you should be more than capable of rebuilding one going on what you told us you have already achieved.
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2017, 9:53pm; Reply: 79
A Dellorto carb on a vespa is A LOT simpler!
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2017, 9:56pm; Reply: 80
Quoted from efp
Paula

A propos of a much earlier post of yours, that looks like an original bakelite steering wheel.

I'm not a Vitesse man, maybe Vits are different but I know that for early Spits those are quite hard to come by, for those seeking originality.  Theres one being hawked on the Bay of Evil for £300 I believe. Seems the first mods every new owner did in the past were changing the wheel to a smaller sporty one, alloy rocker cover and a pair of K&N's. Must have added at least 0.005bhp.. and the originals went in the skip.

Please dont think of changing it.

J


I had no idea!
That's a keeper then! I'll be super careful when i pull it off!
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2017, 10:04pm; Reply: 81
I found this picture of the impact clamp.
I'm a little worried that mine is upside down. I suppose it's possible looking at the rack.
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2017, 10:28pm; Reply: 82
Sorry.
This thread might as well be called Paula's Vitesse!
Posted by: Richard B, January 6, 2017, 10:38pm; Reply: 83
Hi Paula,

Is yours a Vitesse 1600?  if so this may help, and is a good price.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Triumph-Herald-1200-1250-Vitesse-6-Spitfire-Workshop-Manual-/122265397592?hash=item1c7795e958:g:SVkAAOSw6DtYTUpG

Nothing against the Haynes Manuals, but...


If you can, try to get to Stoneleigh spares day in February. loads of goodies and quite a few of the forum contributors attend.
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2017, 11:17pm; Reply: 84
Quoted from Richard B
Hi Paula,

Is yours a Vitesse 1600?  if so this may help, and is a good price.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Triumph-Herald-1200-1250-Vitesse-6-Spitfire-Workshop-Manual-/122265397592?hash=item1c7795e958:g:SVkAAOSw6DtYTUpG

Nothing against the Haynes Manuals, but...


If you can, try to get to Stoneleigh spares day in February. loads of goodies and quite a few of the forum contributors attend.


I think i just downloaded that from here: http://vitessesteve.co.uk/Servicemanuals
I did make a donation too. because i'm nice
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2017, 11:18pm; Reply: 85
I don't think i can make that spares day. But i'm very keen to go to one
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2017, 11:24pm; Reply: 86
Quoted from Richard B
Hi Paula,

Is yours a Vitesse 1600?  if so this may help, and is a good price.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Triumph-Herald-1200-1250-Vitesse-6-Spitfire-Workshop-Manual-/122265397592?hash=item1c7795e958:g:SVkAAOSw6DtYTUpG

Nothing against the Haynes Manuals, but...


If you can, try to get to Stoneleigh spares day in February. loads of goodies and quite a few of the forum contributors attend.


Dammit, i've been drinking wine and i've bought that too!

Posted by: Richard B, January 6, 2017, 11:50pm; Reply: 87
I've renamed the thread for you. I don't think you have wasted any money on that manual.
Posted by: efp, January 7, 2017, 4:40am; Reply: 88
Quoted from Paula


I had no idea!
That's a keeper then! I'll be super careful when i pull it off!


Good to hear 😀

Again, can't speak for  Vitesses, but wood rim Formula wheels were an official upgrade on spits/gt6s, and Moto-litas are classic albiet unofficial, enhancement, but anything else is to my mind a retrograde step. But then I am a tad originality obsessive.. whatever works for you. To my mind the original bakelite looks just right, but I can understand those who dont like the size/feel.

Forgot to mention: the gearknob is the other item usually swapped out by new owners. If yours is the original, again, count yourself lucky: they are also like rocking-horse poo.

J
Posted by: Paula, January 7, 2017, 9:36am; Reply: 89
Quoted from Richard B
I've renamed the thread for you. I don't think you have wasted any money on that manual.


Ha! That's brilliant Stand by for many more questions. Next up fuel gauge.
Pretty sure i've got this one covered though, just waiting for some wire to be delivered from ebay
Posted by: TedTaylor, January 7, 2017, 11:35am; Reply: 90
Quoted from efp


but wood rim Formula wheels were an official upgrade on spits/gt6s, and Moto-litas are classic albiet unofficial, enhancement, but anything else is to my mind a retrograde step.


Forget Formula.  Apart from the one at £300 on ebay I have a restored one for sale at £100 - for a small chassis car (i.e. Vitesse) but without the boss.  

Yes Formula are very nice and correct upgrade but Motoita are more practical as full range of bosses and styles.

MUT
Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 7, 2017, 9:12pm; Reply: 91
Quoted from Paula


I had no idea!
I'll be super careful when i pull it off!


Ooer Missus!!! :o

Mark
Posted by: Paula, January 8, 2017, 11:55am; Reply: 92
Quoted from Mark Hammond


Ooer Missus!!! :o

Mark


Ooooh Matron!
Posted by: Sheepy, January 8, 2017, 1:40pm; Reply: 93
Quoted from Paula


Dammit, i've been drinking wine and i've bought that too!



It's dangerous to drink and surf the bay of evil!  ;)


There are other opportunities for spares days, and even autojumbles, but that one in stonleigh is the main one dedicated to our trumps.
Posted by: TedTaylor, January 8, 2017, 5:49pm; Reply: 94
And there will be a CT club stand there so you can meet some more of us raving lunatics - speaking about myself of course (whistle)

MUT
Posted by: Paula, January 8, 2017, 7:13pm; Reply: 95
Quoted from TedTaylor
And there will be a CT club stand there so you can meet some more of us raving lunatics - speaking about myself of course (whistle)

MUT


I think i'll fit right in!
Shame i'm away though.
Posted by: Paula, January 9, 2017, 11:33am; Reply: 96
I mean i just made a fuel gauge checker from an old glasses case.
That's time consuming, unnecessary and cost money.
Exactly the sort of thing i love.
Posted by: Paula, January 9, 2017, 11:37am; Reply: 97
I think i got it right with 200ohms?
Posted by: JohnD, January 9, 2017, 12:47pm; Reply: 98
Black magic box, Paula!

What does it do?
John
Posted by: Paula, January 9, 2017, 12:51pm; Reply: 99
It should do the job of the fuel level sender so i can check the sender, wires and gauge without taking it out of the tank.
It's just a variable resistor (potentiometer) for couple of quid on ebay.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/121839695836?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2648&var=420832724713&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
Posted by: JohnD, January 9, 2017, 1:04pm; Reply: 100
Spot on, Paula.

See: http://www.triumphexp.com/phorum/read.php?8,936993  GT6 sender almost certainly the same

Quote: "Full - ~32 ohms

Half - ~100 ohms

Empty - ~253 ohms"

John
That's a most professional-looking multimeter!
Posted by: ferny, January 9, 2017, 1:05pm; Reply: 101
I just used a stick through the tank neck...
Posted by: Paula, January 9, 2017, 1:08pm; Reply: 102
I like it as it's analogue and very very cheap. I've had it a couple of years and it's a bargain too! £10!
http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/mt-2017-large-analogue-multimeter-n60lk
Posted by: Paula, January 9, 2017, 1:13pm; Reply: 103
Quoted from ferny
I just used a stick through the tank neck...


That would also work  ;D
Posted by: sparky_spit, January 9, 2017, 2:58pm; Reply: 104
Excuse if I'm being a bit stupid and have missed something, but that reading on the multimeter is showing 20 Ohms.  If you had the rotary switch on the X10 range then it would be 200 Ohms.

I'm only saying this in case you are trying to calibrate your glasses-case-potentiometer-tank-sender-test-equipment before using it, ending up with an error, and having to resort to using Ferny's stick.
Posted by: Paula, January 9, 2017, 4:19pm; Reply: 105
Quoted from sparky_spit
Excuse if I'm being a bit stupid and have missed something, but that reading on the multimeter is showing 20 Ohms.  If you had the rotary switch on the X10 range then it would be 200 Ohms.

I'm only saying this in case you are trying to calibrate your glasses-case-potentiometer-tank-sender-test-equipment before using it, ending up with an error, and having to resort to using Ferny's stick.


The meter is on X1 not X10 i was checking to see if it went from 0 to 200 ohms.
It's on 20 ohms on the meter just because that's where the pot is at the moment.
It's got a name now though!
Ladies and gentlemen i give you The glasses-case-potentiometer-tank-sender-test-equipment! Or GCPTSE for short!
I'll get me stick.
Posted by: TedTaylor, January 9, 2017, 5:56pm; Reply: 106
Who's a cl;ever girl them!

Personally I have peak into the tank using the light from a match to see with.

MUT
Posted by: Paula, January 9, 2017, 6:39pm; Reply: 107
Quoted from TedTaylor
Who's a cl;ever girl them!

Personally I have peak into the tank using the light from a match to see with.

MUT


if you run the flame along the seams of the tank you can find any leaks too!
Posted by: vitesse 68, January 9, 2017, 7:29pm; Reply: 108
Hi have been following this thread , its nice to see a new member on here with a sense of humour and showing willing good luck and welcome to the Triumph Loonie Club  :)
Posted by: Radders, January 9, 2017, 7:44pm; Reply: 109
Quoted from vitesse 68
Hi have been following this thread , its nice to see a new member on here with a sense of humour and showing willing good luck and welcome to the Triumph Loonie Club  :)


It's also far more entertaining than Davemate's threads.  ;D ;D ;D

Posted by: Paula, January 9, 2017, 9:45pm; Reply: 110
Quoted from vitesse 68
Hi have been following this thread , its nice to see a new member on here with a sense of humour and showing willing good luck and welcome to the Triumph Loonie Club  :)


Thanks!
Posted by: TedTaylor, January 9, 2017, 10:10pm; Reply: 111
Quoted from Radders


It's also far more entertaining than Davemate's threads.  ;D ;D ;D



(naughty)
Posted by: efp, January 9, 2017, 10:13pm; Reply: 112
Memo to self: create new user account for myself under the name Sharon, and use cute female avatar pic.
Sit back and enjoy very quick and friendly responses and banter for some reason.

Lol No offence Paula, you seem to be fitting right in, know what you are talking about and no one can deny the happy novelty of having an enthusiastic female in this bastion of grumpy greasy old gits.  Wish there more like you.  Welcome.
Posted by: Nick Jones, January 9, 2017, 10:42pm; Reply: 113
Quoted from efp


Lol No offence Paula, you seem to be fitting right in, know what you are talking about and no one can deny the happy novelty of having an enthusiastic female in this bastion of grumpy greasy old gits.  Wish there more like you.  Welcome.


Just so.  Though I'm not sure  about the "bastion of grumpy, greasy old gits".  I'm not that old...... am I?  :-/  I mean, my kids say I am but I don't take any notice of them  :X

Nick

PS, waiting for the title to change to (working again!)!
Posted by: ferny, January 10, 2017, 12:09am; Reply: 114
Quoted from efp
Memo to self: create new user account for myself under the name Sharon, and use cute female avatar pic.
Sit back and enjoy very quick and friendly responses and banter for some reason.

Lol No offence Paula, you seem to be fitting right in, know what you are talking about and no one can deny the happy novelty of having an enthusiastic female in this bastion of grumpy greasy old gits.  Wish there more like you.  Welcome.


I think that thought train says rather more about you than anyone else...
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, January 10, 2017, 9:02am; Reply: 115
I don't see the need to comment on it - you don't say 'Oh look there's another bloke joined the club'...
Posted by: Davemate, January 10, 2017, 9:26am; Reply: 116
Quoted from Radders


It's also far more entertaining than Davemate's threads.  ;D ;D ;D



Even though there's not a single mention about
"Strong wind"
"Water magically disappeared"
"Poo drain dye"
"Whoops that's not supposed to do that,is it !"
"I'll have to ask the wife"

I could go on for pages and pages,but you'd all get bored  ;D

Posted by: timbancroft61, January 10, 2017, 8:52pm; Reply: 117
Yes....we would!

Good old Dave.

Ferny V Dave M.....just who is the king of smut?
Posted by: Paula, January 10, 2017, 10:21pm; Reply: 118
Quoted from efp
Memo to self: create new user account for myself under the name Sharon, and use cute female avatar pic.
Sit back and enjoy very quick and friendly responses and banter for some reason.

Lol No offence Paula, you seem to be fitting right in, know what you are talking about and no one can deny the happy novelty of having an enthusiastic female in this bastion of grumpy greasy old gits.  Wish there more like you.  Welcome.


Maybe i did!
Posted by: Paula, January 10, 2017, 10:40pm; Reply: 119
Any hoo!
I popped down the garage that's looking at the car and giving it a service and i was very impressed to see an old Austin Van and a old American pickup already there.
They seem great.
They told me the problem was with a fuel pipe shorting out the coil. They re routed it and they tell me it's all great now. I can't see how that would make it only cut out when it's warm, but they seem confident.
I haven't got it back yet as they are going to check it all out for me while it's up in the air. ( I thought it was worth having them do it )

He showed me some rust on the Side Chassis Rails. He said it will need welding for the next MOT.
Should i buy a couple and take them to him to weld in or let him weld it up with plates instead?

I'll keep on asking questions until you discover i'm an old geezer called Bob. (short for Kate)  :)
Posted by: Paula, January 10, 2017, 10:56pm; Reply: 120
Quoted from Nick Jones




PS, waiting for the title to change to (working again!)!


SOON!
Posted by: Richard B, January 10, 2017, 11:54pm; Reply: 121
Quoted from Paula
He showed me some rust on the Side Chassis Rails. He said it will need welding for the next MOT.
Should i buy a couple and take them to him to weld in or let him weld it up with plates instead?


Try and post some pictures of the rust.

Also worth seeing if you have these fitted to the siderails. They are quite often forgotten

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TRIUMPH-HERALD-VITESSE-CHIC-DOIG-CHASSIS-SIDERAIL-REAR-OUTRIGGER-STIFFENER-/351635277205?hash=item51df188595:g:LNcAAOSw-zxWoMlP
Posted by: Steve P, January 11, 2017, 8:12am; Reply: 122
Paula/Kate/Bob,

Didn`t you know about the welding required when you bought it last week?
S
Posted by: Paula, January 11, 2017, 8:30am; Reply: 123
Quoted from Steve P
Paula/Kate/Bob,

Didn`t you know about the welding required when you bought it last week?
S


No. I missed it.
Posted by: RobPearce, January 11, 2017, 8:37am; Reply: 124
I don't wish to disparage your local garage (who may be every bit as excellent as the not-so-local one I use for MOTs) but in my experience it is ALWAYS worth a second (expert) opinion on "rust that will need welding next year" that gets spotted by a garage doing mechanical work on the car.

I hope their diagnosis of the fuel pipe shorting is correct. It takes me back to a non-Triumph I had once... a VW Passat that developed intermittent misfire, which grew into occasional stalling, then leaving me stranded waiting for Green Flag... and cost me hundreds of pounds in garage bills trying to find the faulty ignition component. It turned out, eventually, to be the engine earth strap rubbing through the insulation on the wiring loom. Two inches of insulation tape fixed it completely. Unfortunately for the Passat (but not really for me) I'd already bought its replacement - a two-door Toledo - before discovering that.
Posted by: Paula, January 11, 2017, 8:47am; Reply: 125
Quoted from RobPearce
I don't wish to disparage your local garage (who may be every bit as excellent as the not-so-local one I use for MOTs) but in my experience it is ALWAYS worth a second (expert) opinion on "rust that will need welding next year" that gets spotted by a garage doing mechanical work on the car.

I hope their diagnosis of the fuel pipe shorting is correct. It takes me back to a non-Triumph I had once... a VW Passat that developed intermittent misfire, which grew into occasional stalling, then leaving me stranded waiting for Green Flag... and cost me hundreds of pounds in garage bills trying to find the faulty ignition component. It turned out, eventually, to be the engine earth strap rubbing through the insulation on the wiring loom. Two inches of insulation tape fixed it completely. Unfortunately for the Passat (but not really for me) I'd already bought its replacement - a two-door Toledo - before discovering that.


I'll get photos when i get it back in a day or so.
Feel a bit stupid really as i had all these plans of what i was going to do when i got down to the car, including getting on the floor and checking for rust.
But I got carried away by the new paint job. I thought, if you're going to go to the trouble of respraying you would sort the rust first!
DOH!
Posted by: Steve P, January 11, 2017, 11:16am; Reply: 126
Quoted from Paula


I'll get photos when i get it back in a day or so.
Feel a bit stupid really as i had all these plans of what i was going to do when i got down to the car, including getting on the floor and checking for rust.
But I got carried away by the new paint job. I thought, if you're going to go to the trouble of respraying you would sort the rust first!
DOH!


I really hope the fact it has a new paint job doesn`t mean its hiding other things.Where did you see it advertised?
S
Posted by: Sheepy, January 11, 2017, 11:30am; Reply: 127
Bob,

does that garage also do MOT's?
it depends how bad the rust is, just surface rust and they are paniking, or is it really flacky (like the one in your picture  ;) )
a good picture will help us ( of the rust!) to advise you
Posted by: efp, January 11, 2017, 1:45pm; Reply: 128
i'd say that if this garage is telling you that it will need fixing for your 'next' mot, the rot can't be too bad, and they are giving you good professional service in pointing out a potential problem, without trying to panic you out of money now.  A good sign. And means you have plenty of time to get second, or our, opinions before rushing into anything.

Strange that the PO didn't fix/bodge it though, its a easy job compared to many body rot problems.

Look forward to seeing the pics too.  We do love pix here, though I must admit I'm rather remiss in this due to the faff of resizing down each time. Hope this board gets updated one day to a system that can handle images better  

best

Sharon


Posted by: Bitumen Boy, January 11, 2017, 3:02pm; Reply: 129
Quoted from Richard B


Try and post some pictures of the rust.

Also worth seeing if you have these fitted to the siderails. They are quite often forgotten

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TRIUMPH-HERALD-VITESSE-CHIC-DOIG-CHASSIS-SIDERAIL-REAR-OUTRIGGER-STIFFENER-/351635277205?hash=item51df188595:g:LNcAAOSw-zxWoMlP


You learn something new every day, had my Herald over 12 years now and never seen those before, my car certainly doesn't have any. I'm hazarding a guess that fitting them properly is a body-off job, so no point in me worrying about it?
Posted by: Dogsbody47uk, January 11, 2017, 7:54pm; Reply: 130
They usually get left off on a rebuild. I've had them welded on during my Vitesse chassis rebuild.
Posted by: efp, January 11, 2017, 8:05pm; Reply: 131
Random and uninformed thought from someone who has no Vit/Herald experience: could these strengtheners be maybe be bonded on in situ (cleaned up) with an adhesive like TigerSeal, possibly tack welded at the corners, to add strength without adding any further rust traps?

Just a thought

Sharon
Posted by: daver clasper, January 11, 2017, 9:48pm; Reply: 132
Quoted from Steve P
Paula/Kate/Bob,

Didn`t you know about the welding required when you bought it last week?
S


Not sure how that is helpful?

Dave

Posted by: Richard B, January 11, 2017, 9:53pm; Reply: 133
Cut the top edge off where it overlaps and seam weld the join?  :-/
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, January 12, 2017, 9:40am; Reply: 134
Quoted from efp
Random and uninformed thought from someone who has no Vit/Herald experience: could these strengtheners be maybe be bonded on in situ (cleaned up) with an adhesive like TigerSeal, possibly tack welded at the corners, to add strength without adding any further rust traps?

Just a thought

Sharon


Some cars do have bonded panels - I understand some VW products do, and Lotus are well known for bonding together, however, I'd suggest that Tiger Seal wouldn't cut it anywhere near, and you may struggle to persuade an MOT inspector that something that's meant to be welded on is okay if it's bonded. No different to sticking a patch on a chassis with gunk.
Posted by: Hogie, January 12, 2017, 12:05pm; Reply: 135
Hi Folks,
              adhesively bonding skins/panels etc together is a perfectly good and strong method of construction. But!!!

Aircaft have been bonded for decades and works very very well. Actually stronger than rivets as there are no holes (stress raisers) BUT!!!

The parts must be chemically cleaned (possibly plated) and the correct adhesive must be used - Araldite and 3M have an extensive expensive range.
More importantly the repair needs to be 'approved' if that is the right word.
Old car parts are generally welded or bolted. Bonding may be against the 'approved' design feature.

I have a shiny stainless steel air scoop on my 4A ventilation. The hinge has been bonded to the top skin. Araldite was used - it didn't come pout of a tube.

Roger
Posted by: RobPearce, January 12, 2017, 12:10pm; Reply: 136
Quoted from Hogie
Aircaft have been bonded for decades and works very very well. Actually stronger than rivets as there are no holes (stress raisers)

Yes, but nobody would seriously condone the use of rivets to repair a chassis!

(Actually I did discover that my old 2500S had had a repair to the front suspension turrets performed by the previous owner's MOT garage using rivets but hopefully we're not such cowboys on here.)
Posted by: Paula, January 12, 2017, 12:28pm; Reply: 137
Would the body have to come off to replace the rails and fit (if necessary) the strengtheners?  
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, January 12, 2017, 1:02pm; Reply: 138
Depends where the rot in the side rails is and how bad.

if it's where one of the bolts are, then it may do. If it's away from the bolted section then it MAY be possible to weld it with the body in place, but the sill panel removed. If you have not seen Paula, the side sills on Herald's are just a single skin panel that screw to the lower edge of the tub, and have four (??) tabs that hold them onto the chassis too. Fairly simple to remove.
Posted by: Paula, January 12, 2017, 1:21pm; Reply: 139
Quoted from Jonny-Jimbo
Depends where the rot in the side rails is and how bad.

if it's where one of the bolts are, then it may do. If it's away from the bolted section then it MAY be possible to weld it with the body in place, but the sill panel removed. If you have not seen Paula, the side sills on Herald's are just a single skin panel that screw to the lower edge of the tub, and have four (??) tabs that hold them onto the chassis too. Fairly simple to remove.


Ok Thanks! I get it back tomorrow. I'll crawl underneath with my phone
Posted by: RobPearce, January 12, 2017, 1:22pm; Reply: 140
Quoted from Jonny-Jimbo
If you have not seen Paula, the side sills on Herald's are just a single skin panel that screw to the lower edge of the tub, and have four (??) tabs that hold them onto the chassis too. Fairly simple to remove.

Simple in principle but I've yet to encounter one that didn't have every single one of those self-tapper screws rusted solid to the C-nuts or chassis rails. And one or two of them are awkwardly located for sorting that out. But you may be luckier than I have been ;)
Posted by: Hogie, January 12, 2017, 1:50pm; Reply: 141
Hi Rob,
          not condoning rivets being used anywhere. I was simply explaining that bonding is significantly stronger than rivets.

Many modern super cars are now going over to carbon fibre structures simply because they are stronger  - the classic bonded structure.

Roger
Posted by: Richard B, January 12, 2017, 1:58pm; Reply: 142
Quoted from Paula
Would the body have to come off to replace the rails and fit (if necessary) the strengtheners?  


The siderails can be replaced in situ. I only learnt about the strengtheners recently. But they could be welded to the siderail before fitment and then the tab welded to the rear outrigger.

Replacing the rear outrigger in situ is more of a pain.  :'(
Posted by: ferny, January 12, 2017, 5:05pm; Reply: 143
Use rivets for the sills. No worry about rusting screws and they drill out in seconds.
Posted by: efp, January 12, 2017, 5:46pm; Reply: 144
To be clear, I certainly wasn't suggesting bonding on that strengthening panel as an alternative to properly welding/replacing the rotted rail, it's a given that that needs to be done properly.

However, it's unclear to me whether that strengthener is factory-original or an aftermarket add-on to strengthen what Triumph originally thought was adequate. The fact that some owners here have never seen or heard of this item makes me suspect the latter, but I'm happy to be corrected.

If it is an add-on, then I was floating the idea in response to the question of whether it could be fitted without tub removal. I would humbly suggest that if Triumph thought the un-strengthened members were adequate then the strength added by the extra panel could not be detrimental to the structural rigidity or MOT-ability, but only add to it.  I'd even suggest that a layer of suitable bonding adhesive across the entire mating surface would create a stronger and easier bond than flange welding and avoid those cavity gaps that capillary action of water and rust love.

Whether Tigerseal/Sikaflex would be adequate I agree is arguable, the first thing that came into my head, and were it a structurally crucial joint which relied on its strength I'd also say no, (and god forbid rivets) but the manufacturers data sheets states it is suitable as a panel adhesive and as others have said, if glues are good enough for Maclaren, helicopter airframes, wings.spoilers, etc I see no reason why they shouldn't be used in this non-crucial instance as a simple-to-do adjunct to the existing 100% strength of the existing chassis members.  Applied to sound clean surfaces I've found Tigerseal to be a ferociously strong bonding agent across many projects.


As I said, just thinking aloud. I defer to the Vit/Herald experts.
Posted by: Nick Jones, January 12, 2017, 6:25pm; Reply: 145
The strengtheners are factory original.  My Vitesse chassis has all original outriggers/side rails and has these fitted.  They make excellent mud traps.  Not sure they contribute much structurally.

I think they would be reasonably easy to fit as part of a side rail replacement (using the method suggested by Richard above) but more or less impossible to add later.  Many cars have been running round for years without them so debatable whether they are worth the effort anyway.  Were I replacing the side-rails I'd start with a length of suitably sized ERW box section (40mm with 2 mm wall).

Tigerseal is indeed a ferociously strong bonding agent when used wisely.

Nick
Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 12, 2017, 9:15pm; Reply: 146
Quoted from Paula
Would the body have to come off to replace the rails and fit (if necessary) the strengtheners?  


No.  The outriggers and side rails can all be replaced with the body en-situ however, there is a specific factory bulletin which details this.  The only issue is welding the top seam of each outrigger to the mainrail.  Many cars had the outriggers replaced with the top edge unwelded, although far from ideal, I am sure that it really didn't make that much difference (says he dodging the missiles coming his way....

Siderail replacement is easy provided (a) the outriggers are sound and (b) the body mounts aren't rotten and crumbling.  Whereabouts are you based?

Mark
Posted by: JensH, January 12, 2017, 9:52pm; Reply: 147
http://www.fairpoint.net/~herald948/database/chassis.htm

Did replace both outer siderails (from Chic Doig - ebay) and one rear outrigger on a friends Vitesse last year. No problem with the body on.

Nice car btw.

/Jens
Posted by: Paula, January 12, 2017, 10:17pm; Reply: 148
Quoted from JensH
http://www.fairpoint.net/~herald948/database/chassis.htm

Did replace both outer siderails (from Chic Doig - ebay) and one rear outrigger on a friends Vitesse last year. No problem with the body on.

Nice car btw.

/Jens


Sweeeeeet!
Posted by: Paula, January 12, 2017, 10:20pm; Reply: 149
Quoted from Mark Hammond


No.  The outriggers and side rails can all be replaced with the body en-situ however, there is a specific factory bulletin which details this.  The only issue is welding the top seam of each outrigger to the mainrail.  Many cars had the outriggers replaced with the top edge unwelded, although far from ideal, I am sure that it really didn't make that much difference (says he dodging the missiles coming his way....

Siderail replacement is easy provided (a) the outriggers are sound and (b) the body mounts aren't rotten and crumbling.  Whereabouts are you based?

Mark


I'm in Streatham Saaaaaaaaaarf London
Posted by: Richard B, January 12, 2017, 10:49pm; Reply: 150
Quoted from JensH
http://www.fairpoint.net/~herald948/database/chassis.htm

Did replace both outer siderails (from Chic Doig - ebay) and one rear outrigger on a friends Vitesse last year. No problem with the body on.


Hi Jens, that link appears to be dead ?  :-/

How did you weld the top of the rear outrigger to the main chassis with the body in situ? What I have done is cut a section out of the bottom of the outrigger, then welded it from inside the outrigger to the top of the chassis rail and refitted the cut out section.

I believe it does need to be welded on all four sides for strength.
Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 12, 2017, 11:28pm; Reply: 151
The official fix was to weld a strip of steel to the mainrail then attach to the top of the 'rigger then weld the other sides.  I get the bit about all of it needs welding for strength etc but most replaced outriggers weren't in my experience.  Streatham not far from me (in Cobham, Surrey) if you want I could give a second opinion.  I always love the "it'll need welding for the next MOT" stance garages take.  If it needs it by then, it'll need it now IMHO.

Mark
Posted by: efp, January 13, 2017, 1:15am; Reply: 152
Sorry, can't help. I'm in norf Lunnon. Dont have the immunisations or visa to go south of the river.
Sharon
😁
Posted by: JensH, January 13, 2017, 5:53pm; Reply: 153
Quoted from Richard B


Hi Jens, that link appears to be dead ?  :-/


Working on my pc, but try to use this url and scroll down to 'Chassis outriggers need replacing ...'

http://www.fairpoint.net/~herald948/database/

Its one of the US members' work, not mine - so all credit to him (can't remember his name, but told me last time I did put the link up. Hope its okay :-) )
It has been a good help for me though

Cheers,
Jens (Copenhagen)
Posted by: vitessesteve, January 13, 2017, 6:45pm; Reply: 154
Link works in Chrome but not Firefox for me.

Try this http://www.fairpoint.net/~herald948/database/chassis.htm

The website is written in a very old style, looking at the code it is  wonder it shows in any modern browser.  Viewing in quirks mode may help.  I think it was written using an old microsoft editor intended for Microsoft Explorer.
Posted by: Paula, January 13, 2017, 9:35pm; Reply: 155
Well that was disappointing.
Went and picked the car up and it was running lovely. Went to sainsbury's 2 and a half miles away bought some shopping, feeling very happy. (mainly pizza and beer in the boot)
Then on the way back it was not idling at all. running fine but would die if i took my foot off the accelerator.
Finally it died on a main road and refused to start again.
So i called the RAC and they were pretty quick this time and it turned out the guy used to have one! Still has some parts in his shed.
His diagnosis was that there is some fuel starvation he turned up the idle to get me home and followed me back.
He suggested i get someone to get the carbs set up and check the diaphragm and check for blockages.
It's going back to the garage down the road tomorrow morning and if they can't sort it i'll have to take it to an expert i think....
Real shame as i was really looking forward to getting on the road!
Dammit!
Posted by: Paula, January 13, 2017, 9:39pm; Reply: 156
Quoted from efp
Sorry, can't help. I'm in norf Lunnon. Dont have the immunisations or visa to go south of the river.
Sharon
😁


You're not welcome down here Sharon. With your North London ways of electrickery and running water pipes
Posted by: Paula, January 13, 2017, 9:58pm; Reply: 157
This just came up on the telly as i was typing in here.
Posted by: RobPearce, January 14, 2017, 8:30am; Reply: 158
How far had you gone, and how warm had it got? Tessa had big fuel supply problems when hot after her engine swap, due to evaporation in the pump. I had put that down to having "temporarily" fitted a Herald pump (the replacement engine was a post-5000 2L which needs a different pump to the pre-5000 it was replacing) since I'd never experienced it on the old engine. However, it is a known issue with modern fuel.

By the way, if you do conclude that the fuel pump needs work, I still have Tessa's old, good one, which should be correct for a 1600.
Posted by: Paula, January 14, 2017, 8:32am; Reply: 159
Quoted from RobPearce
How far had you gone, and how warm had it got? Tessa had big fuel supply problems when hot after her engine swap, due to evaporation in the pump. I had put that down to having "temporarily" fitted a Herald pump (the replacement engine was a post-5000 2L which needs a different pump to the pre-5000 it was replacing) since I'd never experienced it on the old engine. However, it is a known issue with modern fuel.

By the way, if you do conclude that the fuel pump needs work, I still have Tessa's old, good one, which should be correct for a 1600.


THat's interesting.
It's back in the garage this morning, the guy didn't look happy to see me again.  I'll see what it's like when i get it back!
Posted by: Richard B, January 14, 2017, 10:07am; Reply: 160
Are there any fuel filters fitted, as they might need replacing.

If you have fuel starvation problems then it could be the pump failing or the pipe to the tank getting blocked with rust.

If the car had not been used very much before you bought it, then rust may have formed inside the tank through condensation, (had this on my Spitfire).

With a Herald / Vitesse tank the pump has to lift the fuel up out of the tank so any impediment to flow will restrict delivery of fuel.

An airline down the pipe from the engine bay can often clear this.
Posted by: Hogie, January 14, 2017, 10:49am; Reply: 161
Hi Paula,
           a problem that happens on the TR series when the car comes to a standstill is caused by the fuel tank vents getting blocked.
Some tanks (TR4) have a separate pipe, some (TR4A/5/6) have a vented fuel cap.

If it happens again on your car remove the fuel cap - you may hear a suction noise - and try to start.

Roger

Posted by: Paula, January 14, 2017, 3:16pm; Reply: 162
ON THE ROAD!
Posted by: Paula, January 14, 2017, 3:18pm; Reply: 163
My local guy found an old tool for doing the carbs and it's all lovely!!
Right!
Where's the sunshine and country roads?!
Posted by: Hogie, January 14, 2017, 3:26pm; Reply: 164
Hi Paula,
              don't leave us in suspense - what did the old tool do ???

Roger
Posted by: Paula, January 14, 2017, 5:37pm; Reply: 165
Bit of a funny story really.
He balanced the carbs using a vacuum measuring tool thingy and tightened up all the linkages and it was running fantastic.
He went for a longish drive and all good.
I came down to pick it up and was very impressed on how it was running.
So off i went down the road until about half a mile and it cuts out again! I phoned the garage and he came out to get me, (he had actually finished for the day but did it in his own time. (massive thanks to Fallsbrook Motors in Streatham!)

This is where it gets a bit embarrassing.
I'd ran out of petrol.

Luckily i knew about the reserve lever and that was that. I felt a right plonka!
Since then i've driving around stopping and starting and its all lovely.

Very very happy.

Better get that fuel gauge replaced ASAP!


Posted by: Hogie, January 14, 2017, 6:25pm; Reply: 166
Hi Paula,
              no matter how clever one is (I'm a right bright spark) things go embarrassingly wrong at times.

Mistakes happen.

Roger
Posted by: RobPearce, January 14, 2017, 7:37pm; Reply: 167
Ah, the old running out of fuel trick ;)  Takes me back to my first Vitesse. The fuel gauge was always off and then stopped working entirely. I got quite good at estimating how many miles I'd get from a tankful. When I investigated the fault, it turned out the float on the sender was full of petrol, and thus not... err... floating. There was a pinhole in it. I didn't have a spare to hand so I emptied it out, plugged it as best I could and made do. Worked quite well for a while...

Glad you've got it all sorted on the carbs front, and no new fuel pump needed.
Posted by: Rallyspit, January 14, 2017, 7:45pm; Reply: 168
Don't forget to change the reserve lever back once you've filled up. Otherwise you will pick up all the crap from the bottom of your tank. Putting the lever back to main sucks the fuel from slightly higher up the tank.
Posted by: Paula, January 14, 2017, 8:19pm; Reply: 169
Quoted from RobPearce
Ah, the old running out of fuel trick ;)  Takes me back to my first Vitesse. The fuel gauge was always off and then stopped working entirely. I got quite good at estimating how many miles I'd get from a tankful. When I investigated the fault, it turned out the float on the sender was full of petrol, and thus not... err... floating. There was a pinhole in it. I didn't have a spare to hand so I emptied it out, plugged it as best I could and made do. Worked quite well for a while...

Glad you've got it all sorted on the carbs front, and no new fuel pump needed.


Thanks!
Very happy and i've learnt so much so quickly!
I think the problem is with the gauge. More investigating needed!
Posted by: Paula, January 14, 2017, 8:20pm; Reply: 170
Quoted from Rallyspit
Don't forget to change the reserve lever back once you've filled up. Otherwise you will pick up all the crap from the bottom of your tank. Putting the lever back to main sucks the fuel from slightly higher up the tank.


I remembered that from my Vespa days!
Posted by: Paula, January 14, 2017, 8:22pm; Reply: 171
What do we do with this thread now?
I've more to do and i'll definitely have more questions.
Should i start a new thread for each problem now?
(I may print this one and keep it)
Posted by: yorkshire_spam, January 14, 2017, 8:24pm; Reply: 172
Your choice! Some of us keep a blog, others a single thread (See WIMPUS' thread in the spitfire/gt6 section!) others just post in the most appropriate section each time we need something.
Posted by: Paula, January 14, 2017, 8:34pm; Reply: 173
Oh i'll keep it going then!
Can we drop the broken down bit?
Tempting fate a bit!
Posted by: Dannyb, January 14, 2017, 9:17pm; Reply: 174
keep the thread going it's interesting seeing how you get on with the car..
I remember when I first got my Vespa back in 1969 I ran out of petrol so lent down and switched the reserve on but it never made any difference, I pushed the scooter 2 miles to a garage and filled her up, but it still never started.
It turned out I'd switch the petrol to off. It wasn't embarrassing because I never told anyone (whistle)
Posted by: Paula, January 14, 2017, 10:23pm; Reply: 175
Quoted from Dannyb
keep the thread going it's interesting seeing how you get on with the car..
I remember when I first got my Vespa back in 1969 I ran out of petrol so lent down and switched the reserve on but it never made any difference, I pushed the scooter 2 miles to a garage and filled her up, but it still never started.
It turned out I'd switch the petrol to off. It wasn't embarrassing because I never told anyone (whistle)


Ha! Brilliant
Posted by: vitessesteve, January 15, 2017, 9:44am; Reply: 176
Quoted from Paula
Oh i'll keep it going then!
Can we drop the broken down bit?
Tempting fate a bit!


Just tell me what you would like the thread title to be and I will change it.
Posted by: Paula, January 15, 2017, 9:57am; Reply: 177
Just spent 5 mins with a socket on the steering wheel nut to undo it (The steering wheel was put on upside down) the horn was going off like a crazy giant dinosaur bird all the time i was undoing it.
It was only after i got it off i realised you could pull the little plunger out to stop that happening.
Sorry neighbors!
Posted by: Hogie, January 15, 2017, 10:57am; Reply: 178
Hi Paula,
                 keep this thread running.
On another forum I started a thread for my TR4 rebuild. It has had over 1000 replies/posts and nearly 60,000 views.
If you have any funny moments/events (like running out of petrol) post them as it breaks up the boring bits.

All the best

Roger
Posted by: Richard B, January 15, 2017, 12:29pm; Reply: 179
I know I moved it here (previously).

But if you intend to keep it going, maybe it should be sent back to the Herald / Vitesse section?
Posted by: ferny, January 15, 2017, 12:32pm; Reply: 180
I always kept mine running on reserve with a good fuel filter. I'd rather have all the fuel to use and let the filter deal with the dirt rather than having a "back-up" full of shite.

And I've had the same issue with running out of fuel. Once because I'd forgotten my gauge read backwards and only started to move to full when I was almost empty, once on my driveway the day after a 60 mile trip which started with "I better fill up before I leave, but I can't be arsed" and finally when I was waiting in the queue to get fuel... Well, those are the only Triumph related times... (whistle)
Posted by: WIMPUS, January 15, 2017, 2:14pm; Reply: 181
I've been reading this thread now and i enjoyed it  ;)

I've been keeping a single thread on this forum for some years now.
Already 155 pages long now  :o
It's not from all the work i've done on the car, but from when i was doing bodywork until now (driving her daily and nearly 60.000miles later).

Sometimes i post questions in a new thread when it's something special etc.

http://club.triumph.org.uk/cgi-bin/forum10/Blah.pl/Blah.pl?m-1345748567/

Wim
Posted by: kin74, January 15, 2017, 3:52pm; Reply: 182
The fuel problem is a classic, thankfully the Vitesse has the reserve which save your life!

Get used to recognize the real empty position of you gauge indicator and - possibly - replace the current bimetallic voltage stabilizer with this one: http://www.moss-europe.co.uk/voltage-stabiliser-negative-earth-bha4602.html
It's a cheap, hidden but big improvement.
Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 15, 2017, 7:47pm; Reply: 183
Quoted from kin74
The fuel problem is a classic, thankfully the Vitesse has the reserve which save your life!

Get used to recognize the real empty position of you gauge indicator and - possibly - replace the current bimetallic voltage stabilizer with this one: http://www.moss-europe.co.uk/voltage-stabiliser-negative-earth-bha4602.html
It's a cheap, hidden but big improvement.


I wasn't aware that the 1600cc Vitesse 6 had a stabiliser.......

Mark
Posted by: kin74, January 16, 2017, 7:34am; Reply: 184
Quoted from Mark Hammond


I wasn't aware that the 1600cc Vitesse 6 had a stabiliser.......

Mark

Er... for some reason I though Paula's Vitesse was a 2 litre. It seems I lost a couple of small details of this story, somewhere... :-/
Posted by: Hogie, January 16, 2017, 9:23am; Reply: 185
Hi Mark,
            I'm guessing here, but if the 1600 has temp and fuel gauges with the bi-metal/heater design then they would require the voltage stabiliser (I think)!!!

Roger
Posted by: Paula, January 16, 2017, 3:50pm; Reply: 186
Quoted from Richard B
I know I moved it here (previously).

But if you intend to keep it going, maybe it should be sent back to the Herald / Vitesse section?


Good idea!
Posted by: Richard B, January 16, 2017, 3:59pm; Reply: 187
Returned to "from whence it came"  

JRR Tolkien



Gramatically incorrect, but who am I to argue  :B
Posted by: Paula, January 16, 2017, 4:18pm; Reply: 188
For FRODO!
Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 16, 2017, 7:14pm; Reply: 189
Quoted from Hogie
Hi Mark,
            I'm guessing here, but if the 1600 has temp and fuel gauges with the bi-metal/heater design then they would require the voltage stabiliser (I think)!!!

Roger


I stand to be corrected (someone will) but I am sure that the 1600 is non stabilised.  If Paula's car is the one from eBay from a few weeks ago then I do believe it's a 1600.

Paula, please confirm?

Mark
Posted by: Paula, January 16, 2017, 10:03pm; Reply: 190
Yes. It's a 1600
Posted by: Paula, January 16, 2017, 10:17pm; Reply: 191
As far as i can tell at the moment the problem is with the gauge as the sender meters out correct (about 30 Ohms at full) and the same reading at the meter. I can run the needle up and down ok with my potentiometer, but the the ohms are all wrong. I wrote down the figures but i think i've made a mistake as they don't make sense.
I'm going to re check and post them here. I also didn't check the voltage at the gauge.
I'm thinking of upgrading the Dynamo to an Alternator too. I'm getting dim headlights and very slow indicators at idle and as i'm using this in London i fear for the battery.
I have a basic understanding of pretty much everything (a real danger!) but this really helped:
http://www.mossmotoring.com/generator-to-alternator-conversion/

I'd love to hear of a easy and cheap way without spending £150 on a kit.

After that i'll probably fit a stereo and a heated rear window element........ Big ideas!!!

The funs only just begun!
I drove to work today and i was the happiest person in London!!!!!!!!!
Posted by: heraldcoupe, January 16, 2017, 10:44pm; Reply: 192
Quoted from Mark Hammond
I stand to be corrected (someone will) but I am sure that the 1600 is non stabilised.  


I've just checked the factory wiring diagram and it confirms that there is no voltage stabiliser,

Cheers,
Bill.
Posted by: RobPearce, January 16, 2017, 10:46pm; Reply: 193
The alternator conversion has, I'm sure, been covered somewhere on here more than once. However, the essence is:
- find an alternator. The type that was fitted to Dolomites and later Spitfires is easiest, and they are available at reasonable prices
- find the requisite mounting bracket. Again, the one from a Dolomite or 2000 saloon. It's a cast lump that replaces the folded pressed steel thing on the dynamo
- you will also need a spacer tube and a very long bolt, instead of the hex bar thing on the dynamo
- when you've swapped all that lot over, you need to bypass the regulator box. The big wires (brown and brown/green) just get connected together (so the alternator's big terminals go directly to the battery), and the brown/yellows get connected together (so the warning lamp goes to the alternator's small terminal). Make sure both connections are well insulated, of course.

Somebody on here may even have the bits you need lying around. I don't think I do, though (or rather, the alternator in the box on my shelf has a dodgy regulator, so it wouldn't be any good for you).
Posted by: Paula, January 16, 2017, 10:58pm; Reply: 194
Quoted from ferny
I always kept mine running on reserve with a good fuel filter. I'd rather have all the fuel to use and let the filter deal with the dirt rather than having a "back-up" full of shite.

And I've had the same issue with running out of fuel. Once because I'd forgotten my gauge read backwards and only started to move to full when I was almost empty, once on my driveway the day after a 60 mile trip which started with "I better fill up before I leave, but I can't be arsed" and finally when I was waiting in the queue to get fuel... Well, those are the only Triumph related times... (whistle)


I think my gauge has a similar problem. reads around half when full and goes up to full when getting lower...........
Must be the gauge i assume? can i calibrate it or get it serviced?
Posted by: heraldcoupe, January 17, 2017, 7:46am; Reply: 195
Quoted from Paula
I think my gauge has a similar problem. reads around half when full and goes up to full when getting lower...........
Must be the gauge i assume? can i calibrate it or get it serviced?


There are two gauge systems. The early type uses the straight 12V feed from the ignition switch. The later type uses a 10V stabilised feed from the aforementioned voltage stabiliser. The gauge and sender must be matched together as the systems are quie different in the way they work, the reverse reading and odd scaling are typical symptoms of the gauge and sender being from different system types.

This isn't unusual, it's quite common for a replacment fuel tank to be sourced from the 'wrong' kind of Herald or Vitesse, without understanding the sender requirements. As tanks are prone to rust, this is something I've seen time and again. The eraly senders were all fitted to the tank with 6 screws. Later (stabilised) senders can either have the six screws or a locking ring retaining it. Let us know what you've got.

Cheers,
Bill.
Posted by: JohnD, January 17, 2017, 8:33am; Reply: 196
Quoted from Richard B
Returned to "from whence it came"  

JRR Tolkien

Gramatically incorrect, but who am I to argue  :B


I regret that because Google first hits on Lord of the Rings does not mean that it was Tolkein's original phrase.

"From whence it came" was, for instance used by Edmund Burke, describing the origins of the misery of the Irish population in 1798.   The unusual word, "whence", applied to other pronouns has been used by very many speakers and writers seeking a sonorous phrase, from President Kennedy to James Baldwin to Leonardo da Vinci to Clement of Alexandria.

John
PS Who am I to correct another's spelling (!), when I am a grievous sinner, but "grammatically" has two 'm's?
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 9:17am; Reply: 197
Quoted from heraldcoupe


There are two gauge systems. The early type uses the straight 12V feed from the ignition switch. The later type uses a 10V stabilised feed from the aforementioned voltage stabiliser. The gauge and sender must be matched together as the systems are quie different in the way they work, the reverse reading and odd scaling are typical symptoms of the gauge and sender being from different system types.

This isn't unusual, it's quite common for a replacment fuel tank to be sourced from the 'wrong' kind of Herald or Vitesse, without understanding the sender requirements. As tanks are prone to rust, this is something I've seen time and again. The eraly senders were all fitted to the tank with 6 screws. Later (stabilised) senders can either have the six screws or a locking ring retaining it. Let us know what you've got.

Cheers,
Bill.


It has a new one fitted by the people that sold me the car. They gave me the reciept it's this one: http://www.rimmerbros.co.uk/Item--i-213411

Posted by: Hogie, January 17, 2017, 9:18am; Reply: 198
Quoted from heraldcoupe


I've just checked the factory wiring diagram and it confirms that there is no voltage stabiliser,

Cheers,
Bill.


Learning all the time !!!  I shouldn't compare one car with another - why did TRiumph change so much, so often?

Roger
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 9:20am; Reply: 199
Here's a interior picture if that helps in any way.
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 9:22am; Reply: 200
Here's a bad picture of the gauge too.
Posted by: RobPearce, January 17, 2017, 11:22am; Reply: 201
Quoted from Paula
It has a new one fitted by the people that sold me the car. They gave me the reciept it's this one: http://www.rimmerbros.co.uk/Item--i-213411

Hmm... Rimmers list two types of sender, differentiated only by the mounting method. Bill says there are three, because the six-bolt type can be either stabilised or non-stabilised. I know who of those I'd trust on matters Triumph...
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 11:40am; Reply: 202
Quoted from RobPearce

Hmm... Rimmers list two types of sender, differentiated only by the mounting method. Bill says there are three, because the six-bolt type can be either stabilised or non-stabilised. I know who of those I'd trust on matters Triumph...


Well the one i have fitted gave 30 Ohms at full. Does that tell us anything?
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, January 17, 2017, 11:43am; Reply: 203
This would probably explain why my Vitesse temp gauge is always at full cold or off the dial. Either that or it over heats horribly...
Posted by: RobPearce, January 17, 2017, 12:15pm; Reply: 204
Quoted from Paula
Well the one i have fitted gave 30 Ohms at full. Does that tell us anything?

Right this very moment... no. If I remember, I'll measure Tessa's when I get home (she is full, conveniently, and I know she's the later type, being a 2L).
Posted by: JohnD, January 17, 2017, 12:22pm; Reply: 205
Paula,
The only thing Bill didn't mention is what the Voltage stabiliser looks like on the later cars.
It's a little metal box, about the size of your end thumb joint, that sits on the back of the speedo.
Wiringwise, it sits between the fuses and the fuel and temp gauges.

What is does is the reverse of "stabilisation" as it turns the volts on and off!    You are a dab with a multimeter, so look at the volts supplied to the gauge.  If you see 12V(about)- 0V - 12v - 0V and so on, on a cycle of a second or so, you have one.     The device averages 10V over time, compensates for variation in the supplied volts which a dynamo car will see, and the On-Off never registers on the gauge as it's heavily damped.

You may be able to see this at the sender too - I've never tried!

See a circuit diagram on Steve's excellent pages of almost all the workshop manuals.   https://app.box.com/s/c970f3ab0c2635962ef5 Page 375

John
Posted by: Nick Jones, January 17, 2017, 1:11pm; Reply: 206
That's the later dash (or transferred from a later 2L) and surely should have a voltage stabiliser.  If the temperature gauge behaves normally then the stabiliser is there and working but there is still the possibility that the sender is not the matching one.

The early 1600s at least had a single big speedo with the fuel gauge in the bottom of it like the Herald 1200s and they probably don't have voltage stabilisers though types existed for the Heralds at least.......


Nick
Posted by: RobPearce, January 17, 2017, 3:01pm; Reply: 207
Quoted from Nick Jones
That's the later dash (or transferred from a later 2L) and surely should have a voltage stabiliser.

Nick,

That would have been my initial instinct but it has been said that the late 1600s (which did have that style of dash) used different gauges to the 2L. We know Paula's is a later car as it has Strombergs.
Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 17, 2017, 5:33pm; Reply: 208
Quoted from Nick Jones
That's the later dash (or transferred from a later 2L) and surely should have a voltage stabiliser.  If the temperature gauge behaves normally then the stabiliser is there and working but there is still the possibility that the sender is not the matching one.

The early 1600s at least had a single big speedo with the fuel gauge in the bottom of it like the Herald 1200s and they probably don't have voltage stabilisers though types existed for the Heralds at least.......


Nick


Partially correct.  The 1600 had a large 110mph single dial (Herald style) up to September 1963 then adopted the 4 dial dash as per Paula's car with a 110mph speedo (as per Paula's car), the MKl 2 Litre had the same style of dash with the arced central switch pattern but had its speedo calibrated to 120mph, the MKll Vitesse of course had a different style of dash altogether.  There aren't many pre-September 1963 Vitesse 1600's left I guess and there weren't that many built between May 1962 and September 1963.  I think that stabilised gauges came in around 1967/8 with the introduction of the Herald 13/60 and possibly a year earlier on the Vitesse with the launch of the 2 Litre.  My guess is that it is a stabilised sender unit in a non stabilised system.

Mark
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 17, 2017, 7:33pm; Reply: 209
Easy to identify the gauge types
12v non stabilised the needles move imeadiatley and czn wag about on the road
10v stabilised gauges the needle moves slowly in a damped steady movementdo not react instantly

the 12v moving iron gauges must have the correct sender and temp transmitter as both are totally
different to the stabilised gauges

if you  intermix you get very silly readings  hot temperatures and reverse fuel levels

if  you have a bayonet fitting tank  you can fit  6 hole by trimming it around the holes which allows it to seat and lock with the ring

The 6 hole non stabilised fuel sender is hard to find now
, the  non stabilised temp sender is available 121997
stabilised temp sender is gtr108

if you cant find a non stab fuel sender I guess you need to convert both to stabilised

Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 7:41pm; Reply: 210
Quoted from JohnD
Paula,
The only thing Bill didn't mention is what the Voltage stabiliser looks like on the later cars.
It's a little metal box, about the size of your end thumb joint, that sits on the back of the speedo.
Wiringwise, it sits between the fuses and the fuel and temp gauges.

What is does is the reverse of "stabilisation" as it turns the volts on and off!    You are a dab with a multimeter, so look at the volts supplied to the gauge.  If you see 12V(about)- 0V - 12v - 0V and so on, on a cycle of a second or so, you have one.     The device averages 10V over time, compensates for variation in the supplied volts which a dynamo car will see, and the On-Off never registers on the gauge as it's heavily damped.

You may be able to see this at the sender too - I've never tried!


See a circuit diagram on Steve's excellent pages of almost all the workshop manuals.   https://app.box.com/s/c970f3ab0c2635962ef5 Page 375

John


Oh that is interesting. It's sounding a bit like miss matched parts to me. I'll get the meter out and do loads of measuring.
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 7:47pm; Reply: 211
Quoted from JohnD
Paula,
The only thing Bill didn't mention is what the Voltage stabiliser looks like on the later cars.
It's a little metal box, about the size of your end thumb joint, that sits on the back of the speedo.
Wiringwise, it sits between the fuses and the fuel and temp gauges.

What is does is the reverse of "stabilisation" as it turns the volts on and off!    You are a dab with a multimeter, so look at the volts supplied to the gauge.  If you see 12V(about)- 0V - 12v - 0V and so on, on a cycle of a second or so, you have one.     The device averages 10V over time, compensates for variation in the supplied volts which a dynamo car will see, and the On-Off never registers on the gauge as it's heavily damped.

You may be able to see this at the sender too - I've never tried!

See a circuit diagram on Steve's excellent pages of almost all the workshop manuals.   https://app.box.com/s/c970f3ab0c2635962ef5 Page 375

John


Ok i think i need to pull the wooden part of the dash off. There's a few console lights out so that will be easier to sort with it open. I assume it's just the screws on the front of the wooden facia?
I'll take pictures and readings
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 7:50pm; Reply: 212
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Easy to identify the gauge types
12v non stabilised the needles move imeadiatley and czn wag about on the road
10v stabilised gauges the needle moves slowly in a damped steady movementdo not react instantly

the 12v moving iron gauges must have the correct sender and temp transmitter as both are totally
different to the stabilised gauges

if you  intermix you get very silly readings  hot temperatures and reverse fuel levels

if  you have a bayonet fitting tank  you can fit  6 hole by trimming it around the holes which allows it to seat and lock with the ring

The 6 hole non stabilised fuel sender is hard to find now
, the  non stabilised temp sender is available 121997
stabilised temp sender is gtr108

if you cant find a non stab fuel sender I guess you need to convert both to stabilised



I also have a very wobbly speedo. I assumed that was the cable?
I need to identify what's what and then change what is easiest/cheapest

Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 17, 2017, 7:58pm; Reply: 213
Quoted from Paula


Ok i think i need to pull the wooden part of the dash off. There's a few console lights out so that will be easier to sort with it open. I assume it's just the screws on the front of the wooden facia?
I'll take pictures and readings


Nope, just unscrew the gauges from the back of the dash (access is very easy) and replace the bulbs as required.  Most people seem to go for LEDs these days, mine has them too but they're a bit dimmer than the originals.  Wobbly speedo'll be a cable, it'll be kinked or bent to a too sharp angle, just follow the route of the cable and straighten it.

Mark
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 7:59pm; Reply: 214
Quoted from Mark Hammond


Partially correct.  The 1600 had a large 110mph single dial (Herald style) up to September 1963 then adopted the 4 dial dash as per Paula's car with a 110mph speedo (as per Paula's car), the MKl 2 Litre had the same style of dash with the arced central switch pattern but had its speedo calibrated to 120mph, the MKll Vitesse of course had a different style of dash altogether.  There aren't many pre-September 1963 Vitesse 1600's left I guess and there weren't that many built between May 1962 and September 1963.  I think that stabilised gauges came in around 1967/8 with the introduction of the Herald 13/60 and possibly a year earlier on the Vitesse with the launch of the 2 Litre.  My guess is that it is a stabilised sender unit in a non stabilised system.

Mark


So by what you know at the moment what do i actually have? Is it a MK1 with a Mk2 dashboard. This seems to be my first problem, finding out what i am actually dealing with.
Could you let me know what you would need to tell me? I can take pictures and readings.
I'll pop the dash open and look for the stabiliser.
The temp gauge is always optimistically low and the speedo wags like an excited puppy.
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 8:02pm; Reply: 215
Quoted from Mark Hammond


Nope, just unscrew the gauges from the back of the dash (access is very easy) and replace the bulbs as required.  Most people seem to go for LEDs these days, mine has them too but they're a bit dimmer than the originals.  Wobbly speedo'll be a cable, it'll be kinked or bent to a too sharp angle, just follow the route of the cable and straighten it.

Mark


OK great!
Will i be able to see the little stabilizer box with the dash in?
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 8:12pm; Reply: 216
Quoted from JohnD

See a circuit diagram on Steve's excellent pages of almost all the workshop manuals.   https://app.box.com/s/c970f3ab0c2635962ef5 Page 375

John


I actually have the workshop manual, so that's great!
Posted by: herald948, January 17, 2017, 8:33pm; Reply: 217
Quoted from Mark Hammond
... I think that stabilised gauges came in around 1967/8 with the introduction of the Herald 13/60 and possibly a year earlier on the Vitesse with the launch of the 2 Litre.
That's what I had always thought, based on what I'd read in the Factory Workshop Manual. But my May 1967-built Sports 1200 has "stabilized gauges" (we got temp gauges as original equipment in the US) and appears also to have been negative earth from new.

Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 17, 2017, 8:49pm; Reply: 218
Yours is a later 1600 with the correct dash and won't have a stabiliser.

Mark
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 8:54pm; Reply: 219
If i put the part number from the receipt of the fuel sender into canley classics i get this. So that's looking like you were correct.
It's like CSI this!
Posted by: heraldcoupe, January 17, 2017, 9:10pm; Reply: 220
Quoted from Paula
It has a new one fitted by the people that sold me the car. They gave me the reciept it's this one: http://www.rimmerbros.co.uk/Item--i-213411


213411 is the number for the stabilised sender, which would explain your gauge's odd reading perfectly.

Cheers,
Bill.

EDIT: I just saw that you've already found this out. I should have read tp the end of the thread first...
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 9:12pm; Reply: 221
Ok. Brilliant.
So now all i need is non stabilised fuel sender. Sounds easy enough.
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 9:14pm; Reply: 222
Quoted from heraldcoupe


EDIT: I just saw that you've already found this out. I should have read tp the end of the thread first...


Just got that in time!
Posted by: heraldcoupe, January 17, 2017, 9:17pm; Reply: 223
Quoted from Paula
So by what you know at the moment what do i actually have? Is it a MK1 with a Mk2 dashboard.


That's not what I'm seeing.
The original Vitesse 6 from 1962 had a dash with a single 5" clock, broadly the same setup as a Herald 1200, bar details.
In the second year of production, a dashboard with twin 4" instruments, speedo and tacho, plus smaller ancilliary gauges was introduced. This looks like what you've got. The same basic dashboard was used on the Mk1 2-litre Vitesse as well, though there may be detail differences.
The Mk2 dash is altogethter different, with a prominent recessed switch panel and tha ashtray moved on top of the dash.

What you have looks (superficially, at least) correct for anything bar the earliest Vitesse 1600s.

Cheers,
Bill.
Posted by: heraldcoupe, January 17, 2017, 9:23pm; Reply: 224
Quoted from Paula
Ok. Brilliant.
So now all i need is non stabilised fuel sender. Sounds easy enough.


Maybe not quite so brilliant. These have been out of production for some years, there was strong demand for used examples when I used to trade in Triumph parts, so they are now quite thin on the ground.
Look out for NOS (new, old stock) parts, Mick Dolphin would be a good starting point - part number 205003
http://www.mickdolphin.co.uk/

One warning if you manage to find a new or used original. Though the mounting dimensions are identical, the non-stabilised sender is physicaly larger than the stabilised type. Triumph in their wisdom made the aperture in the tank smaller when they introduced the stabilised system, so an early sender won't fit a late tank. If your car still has it's original tank then this won't be a problem, but be aware that there's a poential difficulty.

Cheers,
Bill.
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 9:26pm; Reply: 225
Maybe if i use my Glasses case potentiometer in series with the wire to the gauge i could 'tune' the sender to work with the non stabilised gauge?
Posted by: RobPearce, January 17, 2017, 9:30pm; Reply: 226
Quoted from Paula
Well the one i have fitted gave 30 Ohms at full. Does that tell us anything?

Too late now, as Bill has confirmed for definite, but Tessa's sender (2L, stabilised type) measured 24 ohms at full.
Posted by: heraldcoupe, January 17, 2017, 9:30pm; Reply: 227
Afraid I don't have the correct readings to hand, but the fact that the direction of operation is reversed would mean the mechanism needing to be inverted as a starting point. This in addition to changine the windings to get an appropriate resistance range.

It might prove easier to install a stabilised gauge and the voltage stabiliser to go with it. Both are easily available, unlike the sender,

Cheers,
Bill.
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 9:34pm; Reply: 228
Quoted from heraldcoupe
Afraid I don't have the correct readings to hand, but the fact that the direction of operation is reversed would mean the mechanism needing to be inverted as a starting point. This in addition to changine the windings to get an appropriate resistance range.

It might prove easier to install a stabilised gauge and the voltage stabiliser to go with it. Both are easily available, unlike the sender,

Cheers,
Bill.


Can you still get the jaeger gauges?
Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 17, 2017, 9:44pm; Reply: 229
Quoted from heraldcoupe
Afraid I don't have the correct readings to hand, but the fact that the direction of operation is reversed would mean the mechanism needing to be inverted as a starting point. This in addition to changine the windings to get an appropriate resistance range.

It might prove easier to install a stabilised gauge and the voltage stabiliser to go with it. Both are easily available, unlike the sender,

Cheers,
Bill.


Which is the way I went with mine.
Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 17, 2017, 9:44pm; Reply: 230
Quoted from Paula


Can you still get the jaeger gauges?


Yes.  

Mark
Posted by: heraldcoupe, January 17, 2017, 9:57pm; Reply: 231
Quoted from Paula
Can you still get the jaeger gauges?


The Smiths gauges are currently made by Caerbont Automotive Instruments. I'm unsure if they do them with a Jaeger face, the original Smiths and Jaeger instruments were re-branded versions of the same part.

Even if new ones aren't available, originals are very easy to come by, they were used on so many cars of the same era,

Cheers,
Bill.
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 10:01pm; Reply: 232
Quoted from heraldcoupe


Maybe not quite so brilliant. These have been out of production for some years, there was strong demand for used examples when I used to trade in Triumph parts, so they are now quite thin on the ground.
Look out for NOS (new, old stock) parts, Mick Dolphin would be a good starting point - part number 205003
http://www.mickdolphin.co.uk/

One warning if you manage to find a new or used original. Though the mounting dimensions are identical, the non-stabilised sender is physicaly larger than the stabilised type. Triumph in their wisdom made the aperture in the tank smaller when they introduced the stabilised system, so an early sender won't fit a late tank. If your car still has it's original tank then this won't be a problem, but be aware that there's a poential difficulty.

Cheers,
Bill.


Ok so it's looking like a stabilised gauge and stabiliser is probably the way to go. I'm finding it tough to find one that says it's for stabilised senders.
It's also a shame i'll lose the nice one i have that matched the rest.


Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 10:16pm; Reply: 233
Shopping time!
Thanks for the help AGAIN.
I never would have got there on my own!
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 10:27pm; Reply: 234
Not that i'm 'There' yet!
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 10:30pm; Reply: 235
Would this do?
With the stabiliser too.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Smiths-Classic-Electrical-Fuel-Level-Gauge-/360691882559?var=&hash=item92b758b6f2
Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 17, 2017, 10:33pm; Reply: 236
You just need a gauge from a 2 litre Vitesse (which is visually identical to yours) and a stabiliser.  I might have a stabiliser somewhere, gauge is easy.  Go to Chic Doig and get him to mail you one.  Not sure how it'd wire in tho....  or ask him for the correct sender for the tank.  He is bound to have one.

Mark
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 10:35pm; Reply: 237
And this
http://www.canleyclassics.com/demoapp/?ptno=128484
Posted by: glang, January 17, 2017, 10:49pm; Reply: 238
so would a new stabilised temperature gauge be required as well?
Posted by: glang, January 17, 2017, 10:57pm; Reply: 239
No thinking about it I suppose unlike the normal stabilised set up it would just be the fuel sender and gauge that would use the stabilised supply while the temperature would stay on the non stabilised.....
It certainly would be easier if you could find the correct sender :-/
Posted by: Paula, January 17, 2017, 10:59pm; Reply: 240
Quoted from Mark Hammond
You just need a gauge from a 2 litre Vitesse (which is visually identical to yours) and a stabiliser.  I might have a stabiliser somewhere, gauge is easy.  Go to Chic Doig and get him to mail you one.  Not sure how it'd wire in tho....  or ask him for the correct sender for the tank.  He is bound to have one.

Mark


Ok. I'm worried about the hole in the tank now for the sender. I'll have a look at the wiring diagram and see if i can get my head around it (probably not)
Cheers.
Posted by: Paula, January 18, 2017, 9:58am; Reply: 241
Looks pretty straight forward. Power in (40) and then out to the fuel (41) and temp gauge (43)
Posted by: glang, January 18, 2017, 10:12am; Reply: 242
As I said think you would have to split the supply to the fuel and temp gauges as the second will continue to use the unstabilised voltage and only the fuel one will use the new supply.
This company look like they are the Smiths supplier and appear to produce unstabilised senders:
http://www.caigauge.com/documents/pdfs/pil004a-381.pdf  
Posted by: Paula, January 18, 2017, 11:21am; Reply: 243
Quick question.
Where is the Voltage Regulator for the dynamo?
Posted by: Paula, January 18, 2017, 11:32am; Reply: 244
Quoted from Paula
Quick question.
Where is the Voltage Regulator for the dynamo?


FOUND IT!!!!
Thought it would be in the engine bay!
Posted by: RobPearce, January 18, 2017, 11:42am; Reply: 245
Quoted from Paula
FOUND IT!!!!
Thought it would be in the engine bay!

But that would be too obvious ;)
Posted by: Paula, January 18, 2017, 11:47am; Reply: 246
Quoted from RobPearce

But that would be too obvious ;)


Ha ha!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 18, 2017, 4:12pm; Reply: 247
canley list and sell 121997 non stabilsed temp sender

do you happen to have the old fuel sender or was the wrong type fitted by a previous unkown

Pete
Posted by: Paula, January 18, 2017, 6:18pm; Reply: 248
Quoted from Pete Lewis
canley list and sell 121997 non stabilsed temp sender

do you happen to have the old fuel sender or was the wrong type fitted by a previous unkown

Pete


Wrong type fitted by previous owner.
I'll go check out Canley. I couldn't find it.
Maybe i should just give them a call!
Thanks!
Posted by: Paula, January 18, 2017, 7:04pm; Reply: 249
I'm going to do the alternator upgrade first and then do the fuel gauge. I'm running low on money (bloody taxman)
I've got everything i need. and as far as i can tell once i've fitted the new alternator i just have to bypass the Voltage Regulator.
I've made a super awesome circuit diagram.
It basically says:
At the Voltage Regulator:
Take D (which i believe to be the power from Dynamo)
Connect D straight to A! and A2 to supply the Car with Power bypassing the regulator
Take F and connect it straight to small wire coming out of F (i believe this is already bypassing the Regulator but i'll marry them anyway)
Leave the Earth E as it is.
Sound good?
Posted by: Paula, January 18, 2017, 7:07pm; Reply: 250
Sorry i forgot to re size
Posted by: Mark Hammond, January 18, 2017, 7:14pm; Reply: 251
Quoted from Paula
I'm running low on money (bloody taxman)



It's that time of the year again..... ;D

Mark
Posted by: Matt306, January 18, 2017, 8:31pm; Reply: 252
Quoted from Paula
As far as i can tell at the moment the problem is with the gauge as the sender meters out correct (about 30 Ohms at full) and the same reading at the meter. I can run the needle up and down ok with my potentiometer, but the the ohms are all wrong. I wrote down the figures but i think i've made a mistake as they don't make sense.
I'm going to re check and post them here. I also didn't check the voltage at the gauge.
I'm thinking of upgrading the Dynamo to an Alternator too. I'm getting dim headlights and very slow indicators at idle and as i'm using this in London i fear for the battery.
I have a basic understanding of pretty much everything (a real danger!) but this really helped:
http://www.mossmotoring.com/generator-to-alternator-conversion/

I'd love to hear of a easy and cheap way without spending £150 on a kit.

After that i'll probably fit a stereo and a heated rear window element........ Big ideas!!!

The funs only just begun!
I drove to work today and i was the happiest person in London!!!!!!!!!


I got some second hand alternator brackets from Spitfire graveyard or one of the others, a 45/55 amp alternator . Then i followed this blog http://triumphherald1360.blogspot.co.uk/2014/11/alternator-conversion.html
The Vitesse should be the same.

What you should also think of is relays for the headlights, and a fuse box.

Posted by: Matt306, January 18, 2017, 8:34pm; Reply: 253
Quoted from heraldcoupe


There are two gauge systems. The early type uses the straight 12V feed from the ignition switch. The later type uses a 10V stabilised feed from the aforementioned voltage stabiliser. The gauge and sender must be matched together as the systems are quie different in the way they work, the reverse reading and odd scaling are typical symptoms of the gauge and sender being from different system types.

This isn't unusual, it's quite common for a replacment fuel tank to be sourced from the 'wrong' kind of Herald or Vitesse, without understanding the sender requirements. As tanks are prone to rust, this is something I've seen time and again. The eraly senders were all fitted to the tank with 6 screws. Later (stabilised) senders can either have the six screws or a locking ring retaining it. Let us know what you've got.

Cheers,
Bill.


oohh that would explain my 'dodgy' reading on my triple gauge (volts temp,fuel) I utilised instead of the twin guage

Posted by: Paula, January 18, 2017, 8:41pm; Reply: 254
Quoted from Matt306


I got some second hand alternator brackets from Spitfire graveyard or one of the others, a 45/55 amp alternator . Then i followed this blog http://triumphherald1360.blogspot.co.uk/2014/11/alternator-conversion.html
The Vitesse should be the same.

What you should also think of is relays for the headlights, and a fuse box.



Thanks! I have bought a kit that included the bracket and the alternator. I'm confused about this bit in the blog:

anything greater than 25amp and you'll need to add an extra wire back to the battery.

I have an extra fuse box that i was going to use for the stereo and anything else i might add. Can't think of what though.
Posted by: Paula, January 18, 2017, 8:50pm; Reply: 255
So another cable from the back of the alternator to the battery?
Like this? (Dotted line)
Posted by: Matt306, January 18, 2017, 8:57pm; Reply: 256
Quoted from Paula


Thanks! I have bought a kit that included the bracket and the alternator. I'm confused about this bit in the blog:

anything greater than 25amp and you'll need to add an extra wire back to the battery.

I have an extra fuse box that i was going to use for the stereo and anything else i might add. Can't think of what though.


Basically your new alternator can bung far greater power back at tick over than the dynamo. An extra (thick 27amp) wire back to the battery or live side of the starter solenoid will save overloading the single 50 year old brown wire going from the dynamo.

When you have the alternator fitted fit a pair of relays and fuses for dip and main beam. A replacement of the sealed beam unit works a treat too, take it from someone who did it before the RBRR.
Posted by: Matt306, January 18, 2017, 8:59pm; Reply: 257
That will work (your dotted line) you may find two large spade terminals on the back of the alternator just run the new wire of one of the big spade terminals. The smaller terminal should be the charging wire (for your dash light)

The "Electricity for stuff" feed can go to a fuse box. In reality I think it goes to the ignition switch then to white wires to the equipment. I think I ran the feed from the switch (white wires) to the fuse box, I soldered extra wire on to the white cables, heat shrunk the cables then attached them to the other side of the  fuse box.

Get a decent crimping tool for the terminals http://www.autoelectricsupplies.co.uk/product/470/category/87 if you haven't already. Cheaper options are available.
Posted by: Paula, January 18, 2017, 9:14pm; Reply: 258
Brilliant!
I feel ready!!
Watch this space!
Posted by: Paula, January 18, 2017, 9:17pm; Reply: 259
Quoted from Matt306


Basically your new alternator can bung far greater power back at tick over than the dynamo. An extra (thick 27amp) wire back to the battery or live side of the starter solenoid will save overloading the single 50 year old brown wire going from the dynamo.

When you have the alternator fitted fit a pair of relays and fuses for dip and main beam. A replacement of the sealed beam unit works a treat too, take it from someone who did it before the RBRR.


Ok. I'll put it on the ever growing list!
Along with doing the RBRR one day!
Posted by: Matt306, January 18, 2017, 9:24pm; Reply: 260
Quoted from Paula


Ok. I'll put it on the ever growing list!
Along with doing the RBRR one day!


My first was this year and it was a fantastic experience, driving through Scotland with a trail of 6 cylinder Triumph cars stuck behind my little Herald 1300cc convertible!

I am now planning my 2018 trip, on the list to do is overdrive I might not hold up those big cars up so much

Posted by: Paula, January 19, 2017, 5:25pm; Reply: 261
Success!
That took me all day, but it all works great. The car idles perfect now (it was struggling with the lights on)
I fitted a retro stereo with super subtle speaker position.
Covered the Kick panels in acoustic black fabric.
Very pleased! (feel a bit smart too as i've never done anything like that before)
Posted by: Paula, January 19, 2017, 6:34pm; Reply: 262
There is now a whistling noise now though. Bit annoying. I checked the belt and that's ok.
Is it just what an alternator sounds like? It's brand new.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 19, 2017, 6:59pm; Reply: 263
Paula  back tomthe sender,   top of canleys page theres a search magnify glass  you can search there

Canleys

Home Catalogues Shop Online New & Featured Products Archive 

Buy OnlinePart DiagramsMore...

TEMP TRANS NOT STABALIZED

Part Number : 121997

Price :  (£4.25 ex VAT) EACH
Availability : IN STOCK

Quantity

-+

ack to the sender
Posted by: Paula, January 19, 2017, 7:33pm; Reply: 264
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Paula  back tomthe sender,   top of canleys page theres a search magnify glass  you can search there

Canleys

Home Catalogues Shop Online New & Featured Products Archive 

Buy OnlinePart DiagramsMore...

TEMP TRANS NOT STABALIZED

Part Number : 121997

Price :  (£4.25 ex VAT) EACH
Availability : IN STOCK

Quantity

-+

ack to the sender


That's the temp sender though. I need the fuel one.
I'm probably going to get a 2000 gauge and stabiliser. Seems easier. I'll get on the phone and ring around. I want a nice looking one, so it might be too expensive for me at the mo.
Posted by: Matt306, January 19, 2017, 9:57pm; Reply: 265
Whistling... sure its not from the radio? May need a suppressor?
Posted by: Paula, January 19, 2017, 10:12pm; Reply: 266
Quoted from Matt306
Whistling... sure its not from the radio? May need a suppressor?


No it's the alternator or the belt. the belt that came with the kit is toothed, i thought that might be it.
Posted by: RobPearce, January 20, 2017, 8:12am; Reply: 267
A toothed belt shouldn't whistle, unless it's over-tight or running more load than a fanbelt should. Rubber cam belts on some relatively modern engines sometimes whine, but they're toothed onto toothed wheels.
I've certainly heard radios whistle as a result of something the alternator does to the supply. I have also heard a faint whistling from some modern alternators. This is usually because, unlike the original Lucas units the Triumph fitted to later cars, the modern ones save on heat dissipation in the regulator electronics by driving the field coil with a PWM signal. Actually, that's exactly the same as the thermo-electric voltage "stabiliser", but instead of switching every couple of seconds, the PWM in an alternator runs at several kiloHertz. This perturbs the winding at that same frequency, which causes it to vibrate and make a whistling sound (especially if the winding is not glued as well as it might be).
I don't recall where you got your alternator, or what type it is. If it whistles loud enough to be annoying then I'd raise it with the supplier.
Posted by: Paula, January 20, 2017, 9:49am; Reply: 268
Quoted from RobPearce
A toothed belt shouldn't whistle, unless it's over-tight or running more load than a fanbelt should. Rubber cam belts on some relatively modern engines sometimes whine, but they're toothed onto toothed wheels.
I've certainly heard radios whistle as a result of something the alternator does to the supply. I have also heard a faint whistling from some modern alternators. This is usually because, unlike the original Lucas units the Triumph fitted to later cars, the modern ones save on heat dissipation in the regulator electronics by driving the field coil with a PWM signal. Actually, that's exactly the same as the thermo-electric voltage "stabiliser", but instead of switching every couple of seconds, the PWM in an alternator runs at several kiloHertz. This perturbs the winding at that same frequency, which causes it to vibrate and make a whistling sound (especially if the winding is not glued as well as it might be).
I don't recall where you got your alternator, or what type it is. If it whistles loud enough to be annoying then I'd raise it with the supplier.


It is the same whistling you hear with modern cars. Maybe because it's a new noise it's more noticeable.
I'll give it a day or 2 and see if it still bothers me. It's a brand new Lucas Type - 17 ACR - 36 amp Alternator from Rimmers.
Posted by: Paula, January 20, 2017, 9:58am; Reply: 269
I found an youtube video of the same whistle.
https://youtu.be/BBqHWsmvJV4
Posted by: RobPearce, January 20, 2017, 12:52pm; Reply: 270
That video sounds more like a bearing or contact whistle, but it's possible it's connected with the cooling fan on the alternator. Is yours proportional to engine speed, like in the video (i.e. the pitch goes up as you rev it)?
Posted by: Paula, January 20, 2017, 1:28pm; Reply: 271
Quoted from RobPearce
That video sounds more like a bearing or contact whistle, but it's possible it's connected with the cooling fan on the alternator. Is yours proportional to engine speed, like in the video (i.e. the pitch goes up as you rev it)?


Yes it goes up and down with the engine noise. I just went for a drive and it's very quiet.
Maybe i'm being too sensitive.
I'll do a video.
Posted by: Paula, January 20, 2017, 1:47pm; Reply: 272
Here's a video of my car.
It's picked up the whistle very well. It's actually not very noticeable from inside

https://youtu.be/qX1ySzdWJXI
Posted by: JohnD, January 20, 2017, 1:55pm; Reply: 273
Clearly heard at idle, Paula,
To test if it's the fan belt, spray some WD40 on the belt.
If belt rubbing is the cause, the whistle will stop.

John
Posted by: Paula, January 20, 2017, 4:42pm; Reply: 274
I have this reply from Rimmers:

I must say I haven't heard of anything like this before.

I would suggest that this noise is possibly caused by a dry bearing/bush, it seems silly but it could even be a "natural" whistle because of the design of the replacement alternator unit.


I have left comments on our system to express your concern but I would suggest the best course of action is to run the car and report back after a period of 500 miles.

Kind regards
Carl Wright
Customer Services
Posted by: Paula, January 20, 2017, 4:42pm; Reply: 275
I've just driven 10 miles and i think it's going away.
So i'll see how it goes
Posted by: Paula, January 20, 2017, 4:46pm; Reply: 276
Quoted from JohnD
Clearly heard at idle, Paula,
To test if it's the fan belt, spray some WD40 on the belt.
If belt rubbing is the cause, the whistle will stop.

John


I'm pretty sure it's the alternator now

Posted by: Matt306, January 20, 2017, 5:55pm; Reply: 277
Didn't you say you fitted a Radio? I can recommend Absolute Radio (others are available) turned up to 10 and the whistle will go  ;D ;D ;D ;D
Posted by: Paula, January 20, 2017, 6:27pm; Reply: 278
Quoted from Matt306
Didn't you say you fitted a Radio? I can recommend Absolute Radio (others are available) turned up to 10 and the whistle will go  ;D ;D ;D ;D


I only listen to the Sssssssshipping forecast Sssssssssssouth by Sssssssssouth Wesssssssssssssst  
Posted by: RobPearce, January 20, 2017, 6:30pm; Reply: 279
Quoted from Paula
I have this reply from Rimmers:

I must say I haven't heard of anything like this before.

I would suggest that this noise is possibly caused by a dry bearing/bush, it seems silly but it could even be a "natural" whistle because of the design of the replacement alternator unit.

He's not heard it before? When there's tube-of-you videos out there? Oh well.
I think he's right about the bearing, though. It definitely sounds more like a dry bearing/bush than anything belt related.

Many years ago, when I had my first Vitesse as my only car, I heard a gurgling sound from under the bonnet. My first instinct was that it sounded like water boiling, but the temperature gauge was reading normal. Also, the noise sometimes stopped, only to reappear a random time later. I decided to carry on and have a closer look when I reached my destination (my mum's house, as it happened). Well, I duly arrived there and pulled up, popped the bonnet, only for the noise to vanish again. I had a look around but saw nothing obvious. I pulled the throttle cable (this was a late Mk1 with the cable, rather than the rod system that Tessa has, and I presume yours does too). As the engine revved there was a brief puff of smoke from the dynamo pulley and the noise reappeared.
It turned out the dynamo's front bearing had collapsed. When the dynamo was turning (and working fine) the bearing made a gurgling noise. When the bits fell a certain way and the speed was low, the bearing seized up, the fan belt began to slip and the noise went away.
Your noise doesn't sound terminal. If it's getting quieter it may just be something bedding in.
Posted by: Paula, January 20, 2017, 7:06pm; Reply: 280
Quoted from RobPearce

He's not heard it before? When there's tube-of-you videos out there? Oh well.
I think he's right about the bearing, though. It definitely sounds more like a dry bearing/bush than anything belt related.

Many years ago, when I had my first Vitesse as my only car, I heard a gurgling sound from under the bonnet. My first instinct was that it sounded like water boiling, but the temperature gauge was reading normal. Also, the noise sometimes stopped, only to reappear a random time later. I decided to carry on and have a closer look when I reached my destination (my mum's house, as it happened). Well, I duly arrived there and pulled up, popped the bonnet, only for the noise to vanish again. I had a look around but saw nothing obvious. I pulled the throttle cable (this was a late Mk1 with the cable, rather than the rod system that Tessa has, and I presume yours does too). As the engine revved there was a brief puff of smoke from the dynamo pulley and the noise reappeared.
It turned out the dynamo's front bearing had collapsed. When the dynamo was turning (and working fine) the bearing made a gurgling noise. When the bits fell a certain way and the speed was low, the bearing seized up, the fan belt began to slip and the noise went away.
Your noise doesn't sound terminal. If it's getting quieter it may just be something bedding in.


I thought you were going to say you lifted the bonnet and a small woodland creature jumped out!
I agree about the bedding in.
I'll revisit this if i ever notice it again.
Talking of Dynamos Is there anyone that would like my old Dynamo and Voltage regulator? Free of course.
Posted by: Matt306, January 20, 2017, 9:41pm; Reply: 281
Quoted from Paula


I thought you were going to say you lifted the bonnet and a small woodland creature jumped out!
I agree about the bedding in.
I'll revisit this if i ever notice it again.
Talking of Dynamos Is there anyone that would like my old Dynamo and Voltage regulator? Free of course.


Scrapman?
Posted by: JohnD, January 20, 2017, 11:01pm; Reply: 282
A dry bearing?  Do Rimmers expect it to wet itself?

Seems an unsatisfactory answer (I presume they supplied the alternator?) instead of an offer to replace.
Send it back?

John
Posted by: daver clasper, January 21, 2017, 9:03am; Reply: 283
Hi Paula

I'm interested in your dynamo and V/R.

Is it ok to PM you

Dave
Posted by: CyTry, January 21, 2017, 11:04am; Reply: 284
My Spitfire (1980) whistles when I have the headlights on. Frequency varies with engine speed.  All belts etc. are tight, it's the alternator itself.  It's not annoying, sometimes I pretend it's a turbocharger...
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 21, 2017, 12:43pm; Reply: 285
to me thats a pretty normal alternator whine , yes depends on the generation but the diodes or whatever can give  a quite intense howl, whine  just like yours  ,,  

vee belts can give a squealing and sometimes a tin tappng squeaky racket but thats not what you have

there are aerosols of stuff like belt ease to dress the belt whithout loosing grip,  keep an eye out for its useful at odd times

talc powder will also quieten a noisy belt which is more suited to your cuboard.

great stuff to trace oil leaks  ,, dust the pwder and the leak will trace through and show its source...can smell nice too !!!

Pete
Posted by: Paula, January 21, 2017, 1:00pm; Reply: 286
Quoted from JohnD
A dry bearing?  Do Rimmers expect it to wet itself?

Seems an unsatisfactory answer (I presume they supplied the alternator?) instead of an offer to replace.
Send it back?

John


I'll see how it goes and if it doesn't improve i'll get them to send another one.
Posted by: Paula, January 21, 2017, 1:01pm; Reply: 287
Quoted from daver clasper
Hi Paula

I'm interested in your dynamo and V/R.

Is it ok to PM you

Dave


Yes of course!
Posted by: Paula, January 21, 2017, 1:01pm; Reply: 288
Quoted from CyTry
My Spitfire (1980) whistles when I have the headlights on. Frequency varies with engine speed.  All belts etc. are tight, it's the alternator itself.  It's not annoying, sometimes I pretend it's a turbocharger...


Exactly like mine!
Posted by: Paula, January 21, 2017, 1:03pm; Reply: 289
Quoted from Pete Lewis
to me thats a pretty normal alternator whine , yes depends on the generation but the diodes or whatever can give  a quite intense howl, whine  just like yours  ,,  

vee belts can give a squealing and sometimes a tin tappng squeaky racket but thats not what you have

there are aerosols of stuff like belt ease to dress the belt whithout loosing grip,  keep an eye out for its useful at odd times

talc powder will also quieten a noisy belt which is more suited to your cuboard.

great stuff to trace oil leaks  ,, dust the pwder and the leak will trace through and show its source...can smell nice too !!!

Pete


Top tip!
Posted by: daver clasper, January 21, 2017, 7:18pm; Reply: 290
Quoted from Paula


Yes of course!


Thanks. Have PM ed you

Cheers Dave

Posted by: ferny, January 22, 2017, 8:42am; Reply: 291
The alternator shouldn't whine, or screech. The noise you hear on modern cars is either the power steering pump (Mini's) or cam belt. The one in my Herald makes it sound like a mini-supercharger. Honest.

Look down the line of all the pulleys. Are they perfectly aligned? A possibility for noise is that the alternator pulley isn't perfectly in line with the other two and you're hearing it run on the outside edge of the belt which will slip compared to running on both of its outer sides. Feel free to hold a straight edge up against the pulleys to assist your eyes. My money is on this being the issue.

If all is fine then stick a long screwdriver on your water pump and the other end on your ear when running and see if it sounds like it's coming from there. Drop the belt off and spin the pulleys on both the water pump and alternator and do so again whilst putting load on them. You're looking for anything which doesn't feel constantly smooth. I'm saying this as before everything may have been "loose" and if you've now got everything correct it may be showing up weaknesses on things like the water pump.


Release agents on the belt should have been worn off by now si if it's none of the above... your alternator is buggered. Possibly.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 22, 2017, 7:25pm; Reply: 292
The kit has a lucas 17ACR unit  it will whine and sing  they all do and always did in their heyday
its a normal characteristics of the vintage

from your video I would be more interested in the tappet noise  you can improve that

gaps are 0.010" cold engine   how to details in your manual    

pete
Posted by: Paula, January 23, 2017, 9:33am; Reply: 293
Quoted from ferny
The alternator shouldn't whine, or screech. The noise you hear on modern cars is either the power steering pump (Mini's) or cam belt. The one in my Herald makes it sound like a mini-supercharger. Honest.

Look down the line of all the pulleys. Are they perfectly aligned? A possibility for noise is that the alternator pulley isn't perfectly in line with the other two and you're hearing it run on the outside edge of the belt which will slip compared to running on both of its outer sides. Feel free to hold a straight edge up against the pulleys to assist your eyes. My money is on this being the issue.

If all is fine then stick a long screwdriver on your water pump and the other end on your ear when running and see if it sounds like it's coming from there. Drop the belt off and spin the pulleys on both the water pump and alternator and do so again whilst putting load on them. You're looking for anything which doesn't feel constantly smooth. I'm saying this as before everything may have been "loose" and if you've now got everything correct it may be showing up weaknesses on things like the water pump.


Release agents on the belt should have been worn off by now si if it's none of the above... your alternator is buggered. Possibly.


Thanks!
I got the big ruler out and it all looks spot on.
I'll look more when i get chance and the weather improves a bit!
Posted by: Paula, January 23, 2017, 9:34am; Reply: 294
Quoted from Pete Lewis
The kit has a lucas 17ACR unit  it will whine and sing  they all do and always did in their heyday
its a normal characteristics of the vintage

from your video I would be more interested in the tappet noise  you can improve that

gaps are 0.010" cold engine   how to details in your manual    

pete


I'll stick it on the list!
Posted by: daver clasper, January 23, 2017, 2:33pm; Reply: 295
Hi Paula

I PMed you again. Not sure if you got it.

Dave
Posted by: Paula, January 23, 2017, 6:44pm; Reply: 296
Quoted from daver clasper
Hi Paula

I PMed you again. Not sure if you got it.

Dave


Just replied.
Posted by: Paula, January 23, 2017, 7:01pm; Reply: 297
Had an interesting one today.
I drove to my Dads in Hertfordshire about 80 miles. When i got there i turned the engine off for about 5 mins and it refused to start again. Turning over and not firing at all.
We went for lunch and i tried again over an hour later and still no joy. I left it another 5 mins and tried again and it eventually started.
I drove it to the petrol station and filled it up . It only took 16 litres.
It was then fine.
I drove it all the way home, which was probably less miles but more time in traffic.
When i got home i tried turning it off and on again after various gaps and it's fine.
I did stop and Mooredale Motors and spoke to Dale. Who said he'd have to book it in.
Bloody thing.
I meant to show him the Alternator but i forgot.
Posted by: JohnD, January 23, 2017, 8:11pm; Reply: 298
Might be fuel vaporisation.   Heat radiated or conducted from exhaust manifold cause fuel I supply lines and or float chambers to boil.   Doesn't happen on the move as airflow helps cooling.

A heat barrier between them can help, a sheet of alloy between the carbs and manifold, wide enough to screen the floats.  And make sure the supply inevruns around thgthge front of the engine, preferably not touching the block.

John
Posted by: Paula, January 23, 2017, 9:25pm; Reply: 299
Quoted from JohnD
Might be fuel vaporisation.   Heat radiated or conducted from exhaust manifold cause fuel I supply lines and or float chambers to boil.   Doesn't happen on the move as airflow helps cooling.

A heat barrier between them can help, a sheet of alloy between the carbs and manifold, wide enough to screen the floats.  And make sure the supply inevruns around thgthge front of the engine, preferably not touching the block.

John


That's interesting. Like a bit of aluminium?
Posted by: Matt306, January 23, 2017, 9:36pm; Reply: 300
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Triumph-Spitfire-1500-Twin-HS4-Mirror-Stainless-Carburettor-Heat-Shield-/302178280074?hash=item465b3aa28a:g:v1cAAOSwNuxXb9dl
something like this but you need one for your carbs.
Posted by: JohnD, January 23, 2017, 10:44pm; Reply: 301
Yes.
The idea is to put the carbs, esp. the float chamber, in the direct radiation 'shadow' from the exhaust manifold.
While the manifold is HOT, even if the screen absorbs the heat, it's nothing like so hot, so radiates much less to the carbs.

Plus, if it's mounted by being sandwiched between carbs and inlet manifold, beacsue the sheet has a large area there will be less conduction of heat via the inlet manifold, from the head, to the carbs.

Winner, on both routes of heat transfer!
Find some alloy sheet, EG http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_nkw=aluminium+sheet&_sop=15 make up a pattern using CAD (Cardboard Aided Design) so that the carbs can't 'see' the exhaust manifold, cut out the sheet, drill holes to match the inlet bore and bolt holes.    Bingo!  

Proved to work, even with a lash up:  http://club.triumph.org.uk/cgi-bin/forum10/Blah.pl?m-1283198758/
Or there's a long, serious thread about it here: http://www.triumph.org.uk/cgi-bin/forum10/Blah.pl?m-1303407024/s-0/

Or, you can buy ready mades: http://www.canleyclassics.com/engine/carburettor-heat-shields/

John

PS 1mm alloy sheet is plenty thick enough.
Posted by: Paula, January 23, 2017, 11:14pm; Reply: 302
Silly not to!
I love the tray idea!
Would the Spitty ones fit my Vitesse?
Posted by: RobPearce, January 24, 2017, 8:12am; Reply: 303
Quoted from Paula
Would the Spitty ones fit my Vitesse?

No, unfortunately not. The carbs are different (SU rather than Stromberg) with different mounting patterns (SUs are "handed") and they're also spaced differently.
Posted by: JohnD, January 24, 2017, 8:17am; Reply: 304
Oh!  I didn't look further, at the part numbers for Canley's heat shields - which are only for Spitfires!

No, I don't think the dual one would fit. possibly the single carb ones but are they the right shape and are the holes in the right place - I don't know.

So straightforward to make, i'd go that route.
And I said 1mm was more than enough - the disposable foil tray, much thinner,  would be just as good!  See: https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=sr_pg_2?rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3ADisposable+aluminium++tray&page=2&keywords=Disposable+aluminium++tray&ie=UTF8&qid=1485246105&spIA=B01414CR3S,B00Q1NZHSK
John
Posted by: Paula, January 24, 2017, 8:27am; Reply: 305
Quoted from JohnD
Oh!  I didn't look further, at the part numbers for Canley's heat shields - which are only for Spitfires!

No, I don't think the dual one would fit. possibly the single carb ones but are they the right shape and are the holes in the right place - I don't know.

So straightforward to make, i'd go that route.
And I said 1mm was more than enough - the disposable foil tray, much thinner,  would be just as good!  See: https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=sr_pg_2?rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3ADisposable+aluminium++tray&page=2&keywords=Disposable+aluminium++tray&ie=UTF8&qid=1485246105&spIA=B01414CR3S,B00Q1NZHSK
John


I'll get crafting!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 24, 2017, 12:48pm; Reply: 306
quick question are you on down draft solex or side draft strombergs  ???

I  converted ny 1600 to strombergs  my Vit6 with tubular 631 manifold  std air box and engine fan with never ever any heating or vaporising fact of myths  about fuels for 12 years

Pete
Posted by: Paula, January 24, 2017, 12:57pm; Reply: 307
Quoted from Pete Lewis
quick question are you on down draft solex or side draft strombergs  ???

I  converted ny 1600 to strombergs  my Vit6 with tubular 631 manifold  std air box and engine fan with never ever any heating or vaporising fact of myths  about fuels for 12 years

Pete


Funny you should say that.
I'm on Strombergs with pancake air filters.
I had a really big think and a sit down and a cup of tea and decided i should restore it back to the Standard Air box with ducting pipe supplying cooler air.
Makes sense to me that this will help.
I popped over to ebay and picked one up for £25.

Posted by: Nick Jones, January 24, 2017, 1:19pm; Reply: 308
The correct airbox will probably help a bit.  Pancake filters....... yuk!

Vaporisation and heat soak are real even if some cars are worse affected by others.  Certainly used to afflict my Vitesse when still running carbs, especially Strombergs.  The SU HIF4s I ran later were better, but they came with combined heat isolators/shields.

The main problem I had with the Strombergs was caused by the float chambers overflowing through the jet into the carb throat as the fuel warmed up and expanded.  This meant that every hot start after an interval of 5 - 60 mins was effectively a flood start - just hold the throttle fully open and wind it over 'tll it starts....  Not ideal.  Did fiddle about with float heights but never fully cured it.

Nick
Posted by: daver clasper, January 24, 2017, 1:43pm; Reply: 309
Funny how it affects some cars and not others. Got standard unmodified, on my Viresse.  Worst it's got for me, is after idling for ages in traffic jams on blistering hot days, it some times takes a few seconds to restart.

Dave
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 24, 2017, 2:02pm; Reply: 310
and to get a good air flow into the air box ,, simplest is pump hose for aquatics  cheap and smooth on the inside
or
1.5" plastic sink waste pipe, but needs some cut and fettle  cold air is the king   and with std filters works with std needles just how triumph wanted    stick to the basics and you cant ever go far wrong

the stroms give approx +11bhp over the strangles solexs.  so base bhp is closer to 81 than the specified 70

always make sure air filters and gaskets dont cover any of the front face ports , it easy to forget this and fit them upside down
Pete
Posted by: Paula, January 24, 2017, 2:34pm; Reply: 311
Quoted from Pete Lewis
and to get a good air flow into the air box ,, simplest is pump hose for aquatics  cheap and smooth on the inside
or
1.5" plastic sink waste pipe, but needs some cut and fettle  cold air is the king   and with std filters works with std needles just how triumph wanted    stick to the basics and you cant ever go far wrong

the stroms give approx +11bhp over the strangles solexs.  so base bhp is closer to 81 than the specified 70

always make sure air filters and gaskets dont cover any of the front face ports , it easy to forget this and fit them upside down
Pete


Good stuff!
Posted by: RobPearce, January 24, 2017, 4:13pm; Reply: 312
My first Vitesse used to suffer (occasionally) from reluctance to start after a hot soak. Tessa had no problems until after the engine rebuild, when she was useless if hot. On one occasion she ground to a halt and refused to start until I poured a cup of cold water over the fuel pump. She now has an electric pump and seems a lot better (though I've not yet tried her in hot weather). Both cars were/are standard in respect of carbs and air filters.
Posted by: JohnD, January 24, 2017, 6:16pm; Reply: 313
Pete,
Your mod certainly better than the OE 1" corrugated tubing, but physics determines flow.

The resistance to flow in a tube is directly related to the FOURTH POWER of the radius.    In other words, double the radius of the tube and the flow increases SIXTEEN TIMES (x2x2x2x2)
From one (being generous - corrugated tube's bumpy inner means it flows less than a smooth one) to one and a half inches will increase flow by 6.5 (1.6^4).   Double that for two tubes is 13 times.

One large tube beats two of half the radius every time!  But fitting a 2" diameter tube to the standard filter might not be easy.  
Paula has open pancake filters.   A 2" tube from the side of the radiator, to pick up cool air, directed across the filters will not be ideal, but might make a difference, in cooling and in delivery of cool air to the intake.

John

PS  Paula, you will have already discovered that if you ask two Triumpheros a question, you will get at least three answers.  J.
Posted by: Paula, January 24, 2017, 6:57pm; Reply: 314
Quoted from JohnD
Pete,
Your mod certainly better than the OE 1" corrugated tubing, but physics determines flow.

The resistance to flow in a tube is directly related to the FOURTH POWER of the radius.    In other words, double the radius of the tube and the flow increases SIXTEEN TIMES (x2x2x2x2)
From one (being generous - corrugated tube's bumpy inner means it flows less than a smooth one) to one and a half inches will increase flow by 6.5 (1.6^4).   Double that for two tubes is 13 times.

One large tube beats two of half the radius every time!  But fitting a 2" diameter tube to the standard filter might not be easy.  
Paula has open pancake filters.   A 2" tube from the side of the radiator, to pick up cool air, directed across the filters will not be ideal, but might make a difference, in cooling and in delivery of cool air to the intake.

John

PS  Paula, you will have already discovered that if you ask two Triumpheros a question, you will get at least three answers.  J.


But 2 tubes from the grill into the old airbox instead will be better than the pancakes right? If by better i mean cooler.
I like all these answers.
If i implement all of them to a certain degree it must help!
Instead of getting crafty with a tray i splashed out on these:

Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 24, 2017, 7:19pm; Reply: 315
Can make access to the mixture adjuster a bit tight ,
a flat 12mm ring spanner will slip in easy and turn the adjuster
a ratchet ring is best

keep a look at aldi and lidl often do good value sets of spanners
and most metric will fit AF
11mm     7/16
13mm      1/2"

And so on

pete
Posted by: JohnD, January 24, 2017, 8:23pm; Reply: 316
Bootyful!
John
Posted by: Paula, January 24, 2017, 10:18pm; Reply: 317
Quoted from JohnD
Bootyful!
John


£23. Pretty groovy.
I'm a little worried about removing the carbs to fit them, as i've just had them set up at my local garage and they are running sweet.
Can i just pull them off the studs and slip the heat shields in without undoing the throttle linkages?
Posted by: Paula, January 24, 2017, 10:23pm; Reply: 318
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Can make access to the mixture adjuster a bit tight ,
a flat 12mm ring spanner will slip in easy and turn the adjuster
a ratchet ring is best

keep a look at aldi and lidl often do good value sets of spanners
and most metric will fit AF
11mm     7/16
13mm      1/2"

And so on

pete


Cool good to know!
I've got some nice metric ratchet spanners from Halfords. Half price! And a nice full set of AF (very shiny)
And a big hammer

Posted by: kin74, January 25, 2017, 7:33am; Reply: 319
Quoted from Paula

Instead of getting crafty with a tray i splashed out on these:

Those look nice and not so much expensive, but I wonder why they made two instead of a single one: shouldn't the latter stop more hot air?
Posted by: RobPearce, January 25, 2017, 9:04am; Reply: 320
Quoted from kin74
Those look nice and not so much expensive, but I wonder why they made two instead of a single one: shouldn't the latter stop more hot air?

The single heatshield for both carbs would only fit the 6 cylinder (and possibly only some versions of it). The independent heatshield for a single Stromberg will also fit Herald 13/60 or US Spitfire or Toledo/Dolomite 1300. It makes perfect business sense (and I doubt the difference in performance would be noticeable)
Posted by: kin74, January 25, 2017, 10:21am; Reply: 321
Quoted from RobPearce

The single heatshield for both carbs would only fit the 6 cylinder (and possibly only some versions of it). The independent heatshield for a single Stromberg will also fit Herald 13/60 or US Spitfire or Toledo/Dolomite 1300. It makes perfect business sense (and I doubt the difference in performance would be noticeable)

Makes sense.
Posted by: daver clasper, January 25, 2017, 6:31pm; Reply: 322
Quoted from Paula


£23. Pretty groovy.
I'm a little worried about removing the carbs to fit them, as i've just had them set up at my local garage and they are running sweet.
Can i just pull them off the studs and slip the heat shields in without undoing the throttle linkages?

Pretty sure from memory (careful!), they will pull off like that. Maybe have to release the throttle main return spring if fitted(normally fitted to the cable bracket on the throttle spindle).


Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 25, 2017, 7:24pm; Reply: 323
You will be pleased with those spanners years after you forgot whatbyou paid .
good tools are worth a lot

same as decent screwdrivers not a resemblance ,  be it a blade, posidrive or phillips a
decent one is made to fit , not just look like it might
same as decent pliers and side cutters they can and  will last years

keep a look out for a flexi drive with a 7mm socket end,  invaluable on hose clips

When removing the carbs just check the gasket is not torn you will need a pair of extra ones
as both sides of the heat shield needs a gasket
pete
Posted by: Richard B, January 25, 2017, 7:24pm; Reply: 324
Quoted from Paula
But 2 tubes from the grill into the old airbox instead will be better than the pancakes right? If by better i mean cooler.


Triumphs (and others) run better on cool air, rather than through those 'orrible Pancakes. (Look up 'snake oil')  8)

Well done for getting the shields. Having the exhaust under the carbs is not good, but is what you have live with if you have a old 60's & 70's Triumph straight Six.  :)

Modern fuel does not help either. Bear in mind your car was designed for 4 or 5 Star (98 or 100 RON) not unleaded which is about 95. Try to run it on Super unleaded.
Posted by: Paula, January 25, 2017, 9:13pm; Reply: 325
Quoted from Pete Lewis


keep a look out for a flexi drive with a 7mm socket end,  invaluable on hose clips

pete


Got the lot me!
Posted by: Paula, January 25, 2017, 9:14pm; Reply: 326
Quoted from Richard B


Triumphs (and others) run better on cool air, rather than through those 'orrible Pancakes. (Look up 'snake oil')  8)

Well done for getting the shields. Having the exhaust under the carbs is not good, but is what you have live with if you have a old 60's & 70's Triumph straight Six.  :)

Modern fuel does not help either. Bear in mind your car was designed for 4 or 5 Star (98 or 100 RON) not unleaded which is about 95. Try to run it on Super unleaded.


Ok. I was wondering about Super.
Thanks!
Posted by: nicmk1est, January 25, 2017, 9:21pm; Reply: 327
you will notice the difference in unleaded and super,,,better running engine,alot smoother,faster pick up and more get up and go with better mpg
Posted by: Paula, January 25, 2017, 9:23pm; Reply: 328
Quoted from nicmk1est
you will notice the difference in unleaded and super,,,better running engine,alot smoother,faster pick up and more get up and go with better mpg


Wooo Hoo!
Posted by: nang, January 26, 2017, 2:53am; Reply: 329
Yes, unfortunately for my pocket, all my cars are addicted to 98 (eek)
Tony.
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, January 26, 2017, 10:20am; Reply: 330
I run Super in my 5 series. It doesn't like boggo 95 Octane, so i have to run it on that... but  at between 9 and 12mpg, 21mpg on a good day it's expensive. If you're using your Vitesse as a daily, consider the cost effect.

At the CT autosolo last year as I was leaving the trip computer blipped up that I'd managed 4mpg that day haha.
Posted by: Richard B, January 26, 2017, 11:06am; Reply: 331
Yeah, but it was fun doing it  8)
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, January 26, 2017, 11:45am; Reply: 332
Ooooooooooooooooooh yeah. Slow as hell overall though.

I still need to apologise to Steph for making her jump back about 3 ft as I cam out of a chicane past her on opposite lock  ;D

On that note Paula, it's worth looking at the events page for CT, lots of fun events that aren't car breakers - the treasure hunts etc are good fun if you don't mind putting miles on the car.

Here's a link to my buddies photos from the day if it whets your appetite. https://www.facebook.com/andrew.blair.9/media_set?set=a.10154127623045768.1073741852.504685767&type=3
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 26, 2017, 11:54am; Reply: 333
if you use 95ron fuel its the like of the old 2 * stuff we oldies put in side valves and lawn mowers our cars were designed to run with 100 101 5* fuel and timing and performance are based on that .
the nearest you will get now is around 99ron  which resembles the old 4* so if you use factory timing of 10 deg BTDC then you need the higher octane to get the noticable best out of the car

if you run on 95ron then you must retard the timing to maybe  6 -8 deg BTDC and subsequenlty  loose horses and up the temperatures ....not good

pleased you have an eye for good tools   keep at it ,  

Pete
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, January 26, 2017, 1:20pm; Reply: 334
If it's really an issue this puts some lead in ya pencil as it were! Octane boost with lead in it so you get the same knock resistance etc of old fuel, and higher octane. Bad stuff though.

http://www.tetraboost.com/
Posted by: Paula, January 26, 2017, 1:36pm; Reply: 335
At the moment i am using it as my daily drive, mainly because i love driving it so much.
I normally go to work on my scooter so i think i can go premium without breaking the back too much

I definitely want to get more involved in events, i'm gutted i'm missing the  Stoneleigh spares day through work.

I'll keep an eye on the diary!
Posted by: Radders, January 26, 2017, 3:20pm; Reply: 336
Quoted from Paula


I definitely want to get more involved in events, i'm gutted i'm missing the  Stoneleigh spares day through work.

I'll keep an eye on the diary!


Look at the driving events as well as the 'static' ones. Great fun and highly addictive. There's lot's of camaraderie on these events too, so if you get mechanical issues, you'll always get plenty of help.

Posted by: Richard B, January 26, 2017, 3:27pm; Reply: 337
The CT Autosolo is always good, come and take part. Road legal car is all that is required (oh and good tyres).

or if your not sure just come and watch. (If you do you'll be kicking yourself for not entering).


The RBRR is a hard core event and requires 2 or more drivers; and a car that will do 2000 miles nonstop in a weekend.


However there are lots of events between the two in terms of cost and commitment.
Posted by: Paula, January 26, 2017, 3:58pm; Reply: 338
These arrived today. Very nice quality. 1.5mm and very nicely chromed.
Very pleased.

Posted by: RobPearce, January 26, 2017, 6:20pm; Reply: 339
Quoted from Radders
Look at the driving events as well as the 'static' ones. Great fun and highly addictive. There's lot's of camaraderie on these events too, so if you get mechanical issues, you'll always get plenty of help.

As an occasional recipient of such help (most recently on the Shakespeare Scatter when the GT6 burst a coolant hose) I can vouch for that!
Posted by: Paula, January 27, 2017, 11:03am; Reply: 340
Me and the Cat were wondering about these 4 holes.
I Assume they are for drainage, but won't most of the air be drawn up through these? And won't that be warm air?
Posted by: Richard B, January 27, 2017, 11:26am; Reply: 341
I don't think a lot of air gets in that way. I think they are to allow drainage.

(petrol or water take your pick)
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 27, 2017, 12:06pm; Reply: 342
some air box have holes to stop resonance or whatever  that gets set up by the  air flow    and could  also be to even out the temperature across the air box by allowing air out the back end
just another slant on the idea's

Pete
Posted by: Sheepy, January 27, 2017, 5:12pm; Reply: 343
Quoted from Paula
Me and the Cat were wondering about these 4 holes.


Those holes are puuuurfectly normal!   ;)
Posted by: Paula, January 27, 2017, 7:14pm; Reply: 344
Quoted from Pete Lewis
some air box have holes to stop resonance or whatever  that gets set up by the  air flow    and could  also be to even out the temperature across the air box by allowing air out the back end
just another slant on the idea's

Pete


I get it. Like when you have your window open a bit and you get the helicopter noise.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 27, 2017, 7:20pm; Reply: 345
No thats the boys in blue checking your speedo from the helicopter

pete
Posted by: Paula, January 27, 2017, 7:23pm; Reply: 346
Quoted from Sheepy


Those holes are puuuurfectly normal!   ;)


That's what he said!
Posted by: Paula, January 27, 2017, 7:24pm; Reply: 347
Quoted from Pete Lewis
No thats the boys in blue checking your speedo from the helicopter

pete


They'd have a job, it's pretty tough from inside!
Posted by: Spider, January 27, 2017, 7:27pm; Reply: 348
Quoted from nicmk1est
you will notice the difference in unleaded and super,,,better running engine,alot smoother,faster pick up and more get up and go with better mpg


and I believe it has less ethanol it it and some companies had none in theirs, probably changed since I read about it as fuel companies were trying to resist the drive by the government to push ethanol upon them.
Posted by: Paula, January 29, 2017, 12:05pm; Reply: 349
Fitted the heat shields.
Had to modify the rear one so it wouldn't foul the throttle linkage.
Lets hope it works.
Air box next!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 29, 2017, 4:45pm; Reply: 350
for a 64 Vit6 i see they have fitted the later radiator and overflow bottle

one thing to add to the  to do list  
on the n/s of the  1600 block rear of the fuel pump is or should be a breather tube held on with two bolts, one day its worth taking it off and cleaning the flame trap gauze fitted in the joint face , they can get quite blocked

if its been modified to take a spin on oil filter would have been modified /or re routed
if not a spin on filter makes changes much easier but the tube needs a good work around to fit the spin on kit

Pete
Posted by: Pete Arnold, January 29, 2017, 5:57pm; Reply: 351
Pete,

Is that a wild boar approaching from top left of your photo?!?! (wink)
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 29, 2017, 6:46pm; Reply: 352
I never noticed , its a out of focus 'Sooty'   our now departed cat that adopted us,  they all turn up here

lucky it could have been one of the Parrots  out to demolish something valuable
pete
Posted by: Paula, January 30, 2017, 9:54am; Reply: 353
Quoted from Pete Lewis
for a 64 Vit6 i see they have fitted the later radiator and overflow bottle

one thing to add to the  to do list  
on the n/s of the  1600 block rear of the fuel pump is or should be a breather tube held on with two bolts, one day its worth taking it off and cleaning the flame trap gauze fitted in the joint face , they can get quite blocked

if its been modified to take a spin on oil filter would have been modified /or re routed
if not a spin on filter makes changes much easier but the tube needs a good work around to fit the spin on kit

Pete


Ok. Will do!
It hasn't been converted to spin on oil filter, it's on the list too!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 30, 2017, 11:04am; Reply: 354
some use rubber hose , we had the plumbing fittings so ...use what you like

if you change the side mounted filter on an oil change do check down in the bore where the canister sits is a rubber sealing ring,
best left alone but if you replace it it sits down a stepped groove  , easy too think the seal is in place but it gets chopped when you tighten the canister  
and looking in is not easy ,  so be warned , many have a good oil leak after when it was dry before ....its a triumphism

Pete
  
Posted by: RobPearce, January 30, 2017, 11:37am; Reply: 355
To be honest, I never had a problem with the original oil filter. Tessa has a spin-on conversion from a previous owner and it's a nuisance. The filter gets in the way of everything, can't be put "downward" because of the chassis, or even slightly down because of the oil pressure relief valve. The GT6, on its original system, is much easier. I'm half tempted to put Tessa back (I've got a couple of the housings somewhere).
Posted by: daver clasper, January 30, 2017, 3:46pm; Reply: 356
I do wonder about the conversion to take so called "anti drain filters". Mine had one on when I got car. If I wanted to get oil pressure up every cold start it would take about 8/10 seconds of cranking with the choke off (though may be due to engine wear).

Dave
Posted by: Paula, January 30, 2017, 7:37pm; Reply: 357
Well, since fitting the stainless steel heat shields, i've been on a 100 mile trip and the carbs were actually cold to the touch after. Car starts perfectly.
Very happy.

I think i have upset the throttle linkage somehow though as it's now not smooth and i end pushing harder and then over revving at lower revs.
It was like this when i first got it, but the lovely man in the garage fixed that for me.
Hopefully it'll be obvious what's to be done there. I suspect i have knocked it out of alignment when removing/fitting the carbs.

You take one thing off the list and then add 2 more! (pretending i'm not enjoying every bit of it)  ;D
Posted by: Paula, January 31, 2017, 1:44pm; Reply: 358
This throttle thing is annoying.
It's impossible to smoothly push the pedal down as it sticks slightly and then gives, making you rev. See video.
https://youtu.be/r0XzMQpklj4
I'm thinking if i redo the linkages it would make it better? I think the bracket above the pedal should have a bush of some sort?
There's a lot of sideways movement (about an inch)

NIce air box though! Found some gold paint!
Posted by: Paula, January 31, 2017, 2:49pm; Reply: 359
I'm not liking the look of this.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 31, 2017, 2:53pm; Reply: 360
with the rod throttle there's a bush in the pedal assy and a bush in the hole thro the side of the tunnel,, i guess any linkage from this to the stromberg conversion will be somewhat home designed
the link from the rod lever to the arm on the throttle spindle needs to be a sploppy fit to allow for any misalignments. we used a flat plate with clevis pins to a make  rattly good fit.   if its got a small ball joint  on rods  they dont articulate enough and all becomes a bit stiff and just as you describe

if the bushes   part number   13450   are shot i seem to remember a heater hose makes a useful replacement

Pete
Posted by: JohnD, January 31, 2017, 8:40pm; Reply: 361
My first Vitesse came with a mechanical linkage like that.
I contacted John Kipping, then in the Triumph Spares business (it became Canley Classics when he went off to NZ) because he had a phenomenal knowledge of all things Triumph, and asked for a suitable cable.
"Why?" he asked, "the mechanical is far more sensitive!"
And when lubricated it was!

Little rigid link with ball joints from the end of the lever the other side of the bulkhead to the carb.
Still widely available and used in Radiocontrolled models: http://www.wheelspinmodels.co.uk/i/33023/?gclid=Cj0KEQiAiMHEBRC034nx2ImB1J0BEiQA-r7ctl9I0V0Zk3bL8xaBJJNBAPFc-_YIb_DNCpSJPnrXvQgaAptx8P8HAQ


The problem is sealing the hole in the bulkhead, but rubber grommets, with a smear of rubber grease sorted.
John
Posted by: Richard B, January 31, 2017, 11:47pm; Reply: 362
Not sure if this same bush fits the Vitesse. But I think it fits the Spitfire & GT6 as well as the MkI 2000/2.5PI

http://www.chriswitor.com/proddetail.php?prod=138490PU

And Triumph did like to use the parts bin  8)
Posted by: RobPearce, February 1, 2017, 8:54am; Reply: 363
If you've had the carbs off (to fit the heatshields) but not had to disturb the pedal and cross-shaft, then my money's on the problem being somewhere in the ball-jointed push-rod part of the system. Can you get a close-up photo of that bit, so that I can compare with Tessa's linkage?
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 1, 2017, 9:33am; Reply: 364
The angle of the lever on the carb spindle also will affect progressive opening,
Think of a clock face if the carb lever is moving from 12 to 3 it wont open nicely if it operates from
2 to 4 you get better progressive opening   all down to length of  the vertical rod  
If you get the drift
pete
Posted by: RobPearce, February 1, 2017, 11:36am; Reply: 365
Quoted from Pete Lewis
The angle of the lever on the carb spindle also will affect progressive opening

True - my brother's old Mk2 Spitfire used to suffer from this because the lever on the throttle shaft was clamped in place and tended to slip to the most aggressive position (allowing the pedal to return as far as it could). I'm not sure that's possible with a Vitesse linkage because I think the lever in question has a rectangular slot onto the flat part of the shaft. I could be wrong, though, as I haven't had cause to look at Tessa's in a while.
Posted by: Paula, February 1, 2017, 6:38pm; Reply: 366
Quoted from Pete Lewis
with the rod throttle there's a bush in the pedal assy and a bush in the hole thro the side of the tunnel,, i guess any linkage from this to the stromberg conversion will be somewhat home designed
the link from the rod lever to the arm on the throttle spindle needs to be a sploppy fit to allow for any misalignments. we used a flat plate with clevis pins to a make  rattly good fit.   if its got a small ball joint  on rods  they dont articulate enough and all becomes a bit stiff and just as you describe

if the bushes   part number   13450   are shot i seem to remember a heater hose makes a useful replacement

Pete


Brilliant. The bushes are still available. I do like the pipe idea though. You could make a nice long piece and grease the inner.
I'll get a couple of the real deal though. They are nice and cheap!
Cheers.
Posted by: Paula, February 1, 2017, 6:40pm; Reply: 367
Quoted from JohnD
My first Vitesse came with a mechanical linkage like that.
I contacted John Kipping, then in the Triumph Spares business (it became Canley Classics when he went off to NZ) because he had a phenomenal knowledge of all things Triumph, and asked for a suitable cable.
"Why?" he asked, "the mechanical is far more sensitive!"
And when lubricated it was!

Little rigid link with ball joints from the end of the lever the other side of the bulkhead to the carb.
Still widely available and used in Radiocontrolled models: http://www.wheelspinmodels.co.uk/i/33023/?gclid=Cj0KEQiAiMHEBRC034nx2ImB1J0BEiQA-r7ctl9I0V0Zk3bL8xaBJJNBAPFc-_YIb_DNCpSJPnrXvQgaAptx8P8HAQ


The problem is sealing the hole in the bulkhead, but rubber grommets, with a smear of rubber grease sorted.
John


I think getting new bushes will definitely improve things. Maybe it needs so lubrication too.
Posted by: Paula, February 1, 2017, 6:46pm; Reply: 368
Quoted from Richard B
Not sure if this same bush fits the Vitesse. But I think it fits the Spitfire & GT6 as well as the MkI 2000/2.5PI

http://www.chriswitor.com/proddetail.php?prod=138490PU

And Triumph did like to use the parts bin  8)


This is my set up.
The bushes (no 17) are still available.
Posted by: Paula, February 1, 2017, 6:55pm; Reply: 369
I've taken some pictures, but they are not good. It's wet and cold out there and the air box is on.
I've ordered the bushes, i'll take better pictures once i have done them.
Posted by: Paula, February 1, 2017, 7:00pm; Reply: 370
Quoted from Pete Lewis
The angle of the lever on the carb spindle also will affect progressive opening,
Think of a clock face if the carb lever is moving from 12 to 3 it wont open nicely if it operates from
2 to 4 you get better progressive opening   all down to length of  the vertical rod  
If you get the drift
pete


I do, I Think it looks ok.
Sorry about the bad photot
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 1, 2017, 7:06pm; Reply: 371
So the lever looks below the spindle line so about right as the rod rises to open the taps
so its goes from 8 to 10   yes ?
a longer lever arm on the carb would improve the progression , but will increase  the travel needed

Those ball joints will strip down to clean and check,  remove pin and unscrew the end cap.

Get someone to operate the pedal and see it the ball joints remain swivelable not binding up they allow for  rotation but  not so much  alignment  problems.

pete
  
Posted by: Sheepy, February 1, 2017, 7:22pm; Reply: 372
The air box looks good!

Nice flight with the blade also!  :) (I have a v911)
Posted by: Paula, February 1, 2017, 7:43pm; Reply: 373
Quoted from Pete Lewis
So the lever looks below the spindle line so about right as the rod rises to open the taps
so its goes from 8 to 10   yes ?
a longer lever arm on the carb would improve the progression , but will increase  the travel needed

Those ball joints will strip down to clean and check,  remove pin and unscrew the end cap.

Get someone to operate the pedal and see it the ball joints remain swivelable not binding up they allow for  rotation but  not so much  alignment  problems.

pete
  

Yes 8 to 10 i think. Hard to see when you're the one pushing the pedal
There's a lot of movement on the rod from the pedal going left and right of the car

Posted by: Paula, February 1, 2017, 7:47pm; Reply: 374
Quoted from Sheepy
The air box looks good!

Nice flight with the blade also!  :) (I have a v911)


I'm training on my 230s now. When i get the time!
Posted by: Sheepy, February 1, 2017, 8:59pm; Reply: 375
Quoted from Paula


I'm training on my 230s now. When i get the time!


A girl after my own heart, triumphs and helicopters!  ;D (you don't have a motorbike as well do you?)  8)

The tiny ones do tend to drift away in a sudden gust! (Sorry thread drift)
Posted by: JohnD, February 1, 2017, 9:37pm; Reply: 376
Quoted from Paula


I do, I Think it looks ok.
Sorry about the bad photot


What bad photo?
Part 21 in the parts diagram is the "little link" I referred to, and that you have.

But looks to me that the end of the throttle bar is fouling the jubilee clips on the hose between the heater and the water return pipe that passes under the exhaust manifold.  That would catch and cause the symptoms.   Nothing to do with the bar itself.

John
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 2, 2017, 7:57am; Reply: 377
If you do any work down there look how close the unprotected battery lead terminal is on the
solenoid,   I moved mine out the way to on top of the baulkhead  
pete
Posted by: RobPearce, February 2, 2017, 8:44am; Reply: 378
Quoted from JohnD
But looks to me that the end of the throttle bar is fouling the jubilee clips on the hose between the heater and the water return pipe that passes under the exhaust manifold.

Not sure about that. Yes, the third photo makes it look that way, because of the angle it's taken from, but the second seems to show the throttle linkage a good couple of inches below that jubilee clip.

I would want to move the white/red wire out of the way of the linkage and, as Pete says, do something about protecting that live battery cable. Maybe not go so far as moving the solenoid but at least tape some insulation over it (or find a rubber boot, or use some heatshrink, or...)
Posted by: JohnD, February 2, 2017, 12:10pm; Reply: 379
Maybe Paula is the only one who can know the truth, so let's say these are alternative truths.
Very appropriate for the Trump Age.

John

PS new version of Gresham's Law.   Rather than Hitler, how uickly will a thread mention Trump?
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, February 2, 2017, 2:44pm; Reply: 380
And there we have the double Gresham.
Posted by: JohnD, February 2, 2017, 5:08pm; Reply: 381
Oh, well done, Sir!  Nice one!
John
Posted by: Paula, February 2, 2017, 7:38pm; Reply: 382
Quoted from Sheepy


A girl after my own heart, triumphs and helicopters!  ;D (you don't have a motorbike as well do you?)  8)

The tiny ones do tend to drift away in a sudden gust! (Sorry thread drift)


Last motorbike was an Suzuki X7. Wow that was fun. Scooters now though. Unfortunately my lovely 150 was written off with me on it (2 broken ribs)

Posted by: Paula, February 2, 2017, 7:40pm; Reply: 383
Quoted from JohnD
Maybe Paula is the only one who can know the truth, so let's say these are alternative truths.
Very appropriate for the Trump Age.

John

PS new version of Gresham's Law.   Rather than Hitler, how uickly will a thread mention Trump?


Ha ha!
It's not touching the pipe.
It can do if you push it over there, it's got too much lateral travel. (posh word that)
That's got to be the problem
Posted by: Paula, February 2, 2017, 7:42pm; Reply: 384
Quoted from RobPearce

Not sure about that. Yes, the third photo makes it look that way, because of the angle it's taken from, but the second seems to show the throttle linkage a good couple of inches below that jubilee clip.

I would want to move the white/red wire out of the way of the linkage and, as Pete says, do something about protecting that live battery cable. Maybe not go so far as moving the solenoid but at least tape some insulation over it (or find a rubber boot, or use some heatshrink, or...)


Good point.
I'll go for the tape method for now.
Posted by: MDofTW, February 7, 2017, 9:38pm; Reply: 385
Paula - where have you gone? It's awful - like my favourite soap has gone off air...what happens next?! SteveS
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 16, 2017, 8:01am; Reply: 386
I dropped a message to paula and no response   maybe  holiday or deserved break
certainly an interesting lively thread come  to a halt

pete
Posted by: Paula, February 16, 2017, 10:58am; Reply: 387
Hello!!!!!
i'm working away! I'm back next week. I'm sure there will be an endless stream of questions!
You should probably enjoy the silence!
Cheers!
Paula
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 16, 2017, 11:51am; Reply: 388
thats good,, we await the next round of antics under the bonnet      Ha !
Posted by: Paula, February 21, 2017, 12:19pm; Reply: 389
I'm back with a stinking cold, but i'm going to get out there and try and fit the accelerator pedal rod bushes, give the car a good wash as it's been standing there for 2 weeks and hopefully start it!
One thing i'd like some advice on is a twisting ignition switch.
I bought some sping proof washers, but they take up too much thread. Any top tips? Rubber 'O' ring maybe?
Posted by: scotty71, February 21, 2017, 12:42pm; Reply: 390
are you missing the spacer behind the switch? or the crinkle washer which sits behind the chrome bezel to the dash board?
Posted by: RobPearce, February 21, 2017, 12:43pm; Reply: 391
As I recall, there should be a flat on one side of the threaded part of the barrel. This goes through a D-shaped hole in a small plate behind the dash (a spare one of which was my sacrificial test piece when I bought my electro-plating kit recently). You may be missing that, or the barrel may be worn at that point. They are a bit prone to moving a little.
Posted by: Richard B, February 21, 2017, 1:53pm; Reply: 392
Take the shaft out, fit the bushes, then replace the shaft.

Well that how I do it on the PI.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 21, 2017, 2:13pm; Reply: 393
to stop the ign switch rotating  whats probably missing is a plate washer with upturned corners that digs into the back of the panel.  its this that has the D hole in on the early vit6 and others
part number is 618290

mick dolphin lists them at 25p   look up in  hie tssc listing


http://www.mickdolphin.co.uk/

Pete
Posted by: Paula, February 21, 2017, 4:00pm; Reply: 394
Quoted from Pete Lewis
to stop the ign switch rotating  whats probably missing is a plate washer with upturned corners that digs into the back of the panel.  its this that has the D hole in on the early vit6 and others
part number is 618290

mick dolphin lists them at 25p   look up in  hie tssc listing


http://www.mickdolphin.co.uk/

Pete


Sorry. Yes. That's what i need. I wasn't very clear. It's actually the whole switch that is turning in the dash. Not the barrel in the lock.
Thanks!
I got distracted and all i've achieved is washing and polishing!
Well it has been 2 weeks!
Posted by: Paula, February 21, 2017, 4:56pm; Reply: 395
Looking lovely now.
Just need some better weather!
Posted by: Paula, February 21, 2017, 5:20pm; Reply: 396
I've also noticed the boot it filling up with water, Is this normally the seal or lid adjustment? It's happened as it just sat there.
Posted by: GT6 M, February 21, 2017, 6:44pm; Reply: 397
Get that sorted ASAP
and get the carpits up,

Damp carpits = rust n foist starting, no good at all.

ohh, no a bad looking Vit

M
Posted by: JohnD, February 21, 2017, 7:27pm; Reply: 398
Two tests, Paula.

1/ get inside with the lid closed - you have to trust someone very much for this!   In bright daylight, you may see where the seal isn't working.

2/ smear some vaseline (so as not to rot the rubber seal - rubber grease, if you have it)   around the lid edge, shut it, and reopen.  The grease/vaseline will show up on the black rubber seal where it sealing and not where its, um, not.

John
Posted by: Paula, February 21, 2017, 7:28pm; Reply: 399
Quoted from GT6 M
Get that sorted ASAP
and get the carpits up,

Damp carpits = rust n foist starting, no good at all.

ohh, no a bad looking Vit

M


Ok, i'll get the carpets out tomorrow
Posted by: Paula, February 21, 2017, 7:29pm; Reply: 400
Quoted from JohnD
Two tests, Paula.

1/ get inside with the lid closed - you have to trust someone very much for this!   In bright daylight, you may see where the seal isn't working.

2/ smear some vaseline (so as not to rot the rubber seal - rubber grease, if you have it)   around the lid edge, shut it, and reopen.  The grease/vaseline will show up on the black rubber seal where it sealing and not where its, um, not.

John


I like the second one! I'm not sure i can trust the cat to let me out. I'll get someone else

Posted by: Paula, February 21, 2017, 7:31pm; Reply: 401
Should i order a seal anyway?
Posted by: Dogsbody47uk, February 21, 2017, 8:05pm; Reply: 402
Hi Paula. Leaks into the boot can come via the bottom corner of the rear side window, especially if someone has omitted sealing the deck/ roof gap there. Cheers, Dave. Ps that's where water still gets into the boot of my 13/60 despite my best efforts to seal it, but now it's only a small leak rather than a mobile swimming pool. :-/
Posted by: Paula, February 21, 2017, 8:15pm; Reply: 403
Quoted from Dogsbody47uk
Hi Paula. Leaks into the boot can come via the bottom corner of the rear side window, especially if someone has omitted sealing the deck/ roof gap there. Cheers, Dave. Ps that's where water still gets into the boot of my 13/60 despite my best efforts to seal it, but now it's only a small leak rather than a mobile swimming pool. :-/


Ok, what's the best way to seal it?
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 21, 2017, 8:46pm; Reply: 404
There are three nuts under the deck hold the roof down,    the roof sits on the seal you can see, it can leak in the corners,  best you test this is the zone of entry,  (can youmpit cat in boot )
its not easy to lift the roof as the rear window seals can bold it down,  dont want to start another leak

cheap seal is std gutter sealant ina cartridge from diy store, easy tomclean with white spirit

you need to re seal under the rear roof pillars

Then theres hinges,
rear lamps
lid frame  screws in the lid recess  two each side
rear number plate lamp
gaps around the seal dont tend to leak when standing ,
more when on the move

look for any rust holes in the seal flange gutter or panel weld overlaps ,
in the boot look for rusty stains

pete
Posted by: daver clasper, February 21, 2017, 9:02pm; Reply: 405
These cars do leak inside (prob always did). My boot seems fine, though after driving in rain, my front floors collect water and the rears a bit. Got the carpets so I can lift them and mop up.

Dave
Posted by: Paula, February 21, 2017, 9:21pm; Reply: 406
Ok i see.
I think the cat would cease to exist if i put him in there/
So seal it with gutter seal from inside if i see any possible leaks in all the places you say?
Ok. Got it.
Posted by: JohnD, February 21, 2017, 11:24pm; Reply: 407
If it's a seep, the try Captain Tolley's Creeping Crack Cure: http://www.captaintolley.com/

Yotties swear by it (horribly).  
It used to be worth it just for the Jolly Jack Tar, peering through a life bouy, just like on packet of a Senior Service, but they've brought it "up to date", I hope not by changing what's inside.
JOhn
Posted by: vitessesteve, February 22, 2017, 8:32am; Reply: 408
Quoted from JohnD
If it's a seep, the try Captain Tolley's Creeping Crack Cure: http://www.captaintolley.com/

Yotties swear by it (horribly).  
It used to be worth it just for the Jolly Jack Tar, peering through a life bouy, just like on packet of a Senior Service, but they've brought it "up to date", I hope not by changing what's inside.
JOhn


We used it to seal the windows on our yacht and it works well what ever it is made of nowadays.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 22, 2017, 8:32am; Reply: 409
If the cats no help,  ours is a rescue mad silly moggy , I reckon you need rent a crowd  to help
someone small to pop inside with a torch,   and sandwhiches,
they look you pour   dont use a high pressure hose,  youre trying to locate a leak not drown the poor sod in the dark.
If no help about  then you could lay some paper towel around and try to home in on where the drips land.  

take some time , dont rush,  often leaks are from odd places you dont expect, and can be solved
with ease,  its like looking for the source of the thames.  
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, February 22, 2017, 8:55am; Reply: 410
I know this sounds daft, but you;d just washed the car - did you use a hose or a pressure washer? Does the water get in when it's rained??
Posted by: Paula, February 22, 2017, 11:12am; Reply: 411
Quoted from Jonny-Jimbo
I know this sounds daft, but you;d just washed the car - did you use a hose or a pressure washer? Does the water get in when it's rained??


Nothing is too daft for me!
But i found the water before the washathon
Posted by: Sheepy, February 22, 2017, 11:24am; Reply: 412
if there was no other modern cars along the street in that first photo of the vitesse, you would swear it was a period photo.
looks really nice.

we sometimes used to use talcom powder, sprinkle it all around the seal,  it gets washed off where the water enters. plus it smells nice.  ;)
Posted by: Paula, February 22, 2017, 11:26am; Reply: 413
Quoted from Pete Lewis
If the cats no help,  ours is a rescue mad silly moggy , I reckon you need rent a crowd  to help
someone small to pop inside with a torch,   and sandwhiches,
they look you pour   dont use a high pressure hose,  youre trying to locate a leak not drown the poor sod in the dark.
If no help about  then you could lay some paper towel around and try to home in on where the drips land.  

take some time , dont rush,  often leaks are from odd places you dont expect, and can be solved
with ease,  its like looking for the source of the thames.  


I feel like i need to find a dickensian child.
Posted by: daver clasper, February 22, 2017, 11:27am; Reply: 414
Going back to ignition switch. Mine was doing that, as front locking ring had come loose. Tightened it up using those large circular jaw, adjustable plier thingies. though it was still a bit loose.

Found out the pliers had crushed the lock ring slightly oval and stopped it screwing up all the way. Crushed it back to round shape and fine.

Just a thought, if your still having problems  
Posted by: Paula, February 22, 2017, 11:31am; Reply: 415
Quoted from daver clasper
Going back to ignition switch. Mine was doing that, as front locking ring had come loose. Tightened it up using those large circular jaw, adjustable plier thingies. though it was still a bit loose.

Found out the pliers had crushed the lock ring slightly oval and stopped it screwing up all the way. Crushed it back to round shape and fine.

Just a thought, if your still having problems  


I'll look into it! I'm getting the back washer thing from Mick Dolphin (who is now slightly depressed after making all those sales at Stoneleigh to be selling me a washer for 25p)
Posted by: Paula, February 22, 2017, 1:09pm; Reply: 416
Well that's pretty obvious.
Both sides.
I'm thinking gutter sealant. Probably need to dry out first though!
And treat and paint it?
Posted by: RobPearce, February 22, 2017, 1:23pm; Reply: 417
Eww. Nasty. I'm not sure I can quite place the location from the photos - is that behind the rear seat?
Posted by: thescrapman, February 22, 2017, 1:38pm; Reply: 418
Rear deck to rear wing seams just forward of the bootlidnI reckon
Posted by: cliftyhanger, February 22, 2017, 1:45pm; Reply: 419
Yep. A friend got me to have a look at his vitesse. Was worse than that.
But I explained that as he wanted the missing (yes, missing!) spare wheel well sorting so his golf clubs wouldn't fall out, I couldn't tackle the wing tops as well in te time I could have the car.
The "solution" was a wire brush in a drill to remove the rust/filler etc, use some fibreglass filler and a smear of PU40 sealant. Not pretty but should hopefully hold the water out until I have time to do a better repair. Or until the whole lot falls out in a few years time (more likely with this owner, lovely chap though)
Posted by: Paula, February 22, 2017, 2:21pm; Reply: 420
Quoted from thescrapman
Rear deck to rear wing seams just forward of the bootlidnI reckon


That's it
Posted by: Paula, February 22, 2017, 2:23pm; Reply: 421
I like the fibreglass filler idea as i can cover the whole area.
So wire brush
paint and cover in fibreglass filler?

What paint/treatment should i use?

I'll wait for a dry warm day
Posted by: heraldcoupe, February 22, 2017, 5:53pm; Reply: 422
Quoted from Paula
I like the fibreglass filler idea as i can cover the whole area.
So wire brush
paint and cover in fibreglass filler?


Don't think of this as a long term repair. At best it will keep the water out for a while, at worst it will make things a lot worse by the time a proper repair is done.

For a temporary bodge, I'd favour a flexible sealant over fibreglass,

Cheers,
Bill.
Posted by: cliftyhanger, February 22, 2017, 6:04pm; Reply: 423
I have used upol fibral filler for many years where I decided a repair in metal was not justified. The roof gutters of my Toledo being a prime example.
The metal was thoroughly cleaned, and the filler applied. (the cause of the issue was the PO had used normal filler and not prepped the metal)

I resprayed the car last year, which is about 6 years after the fibreglass was applied. All still fine!

HOWEVER the rear deck area is prone to movement, so fibreglass is likely to crack. Ultimately it will need a welded (or maybe brazed) repair. If there is a hole, fibreglass may be needed to bridge it. But a liberal smear of a PU sealant should give a flexible layer?

Fibreglass straight onto bare metal. A good clean with wire brush (in a drill works well) and some abrasive paper.Maybe some "rust killer" too?
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 22, 2017, 6:21pm; Reply: 424
Gutter sealant is good for sealing rubber seals , like the deck seal or glass seals
it wont work under there , it has no strength to support itself

Needs a better filler
If you ever need a body filler marine epoxy is water proof easy to use and doesnt soak up water like
the std fillers   keep any eye out when youre surfing   just an idea

pete
Posted by: Paula, February 22, 2017, 6:26pm; Reply: 425
Quoted from cliftyhanger
I have used upol fibral filler for many years where I decided a repair in metal was not justified. The roof gutters of my Toledo being a prime example.
The metal was thoroughly cleaned, and the filler applied. (the cause of the issue was the PO had used normal filler and not prepped the metal)

I resprayed the car last year, which is about 6 years after the fibreglass was applied. All still fine!

HOWEVER the rear deck area is prone to movement, so fibreglass is likely to crack. Ultimately it will need a welded (or maybe brazed) repair. If there is a hole, fibreglass may be needed to bridge it. But a liberal smear of a PU sealant should give a flexible layer?

Fibreglass straight onto bare metal. A good clean with wire brush (in a drill works well) and some abrasive paper.Maybe some "rust killer" too?


So fibreglass with PU sealant? after cleaning and treating.

Posted by: Paula, February 22, 2017, 6:30pm; Reply: 426
Not fibreglass with resin, but mixed with PU sealant?
Posted by: Mark Hammond, February 22, 2017, 8:18pm; Reply: 427
Nothing lasts forever.........

M.
Posted by: cliftyhanger, February 22, 2017, 9:01pm; Reply: 428
Quoted from Paula
Not fibreglass with resin, but mixed with PU sealant?


Sorry for any misunderstanding.
The "Fibral" filler is a fibreglass filler which has strands as part of it, quite easy to use and is mixed with hardener. No Mat required.

The PU is a sealant type product, a bit like silicone except stringer and stickier (you have been warned!) but is flexible. You can apply a skim over the top of the fibreglass to give a tough "skin" that can be painted. PU is the stuff modern car manufacturers use as a seam sealer or indeed to stick panels together.
PU40 is fairly cheap and available at Toolstation......everybody has one near them!

Posted by: JohnD, February 22, 2017, 9:35pm; Reply: 429
Quoted from Paula

I think the cat would cease to exist if i put him in there/



Your other name must be Schroedinger?

John
Posted by: daver clasper, February 22, 2017, 9:51pm; Reply: 430
I've used fibre filler for small holes in body where on occasion the immediate surrounding metal has been sound (the surrounding metal has totally cleaned up back and front before).

Can't really see much practical difference to this, than using thin skims of filler on welded repairs.
Posted by: RobPearce, February 23, 2017, 8:02am; Reply: 431
Fibre filler is OK for small repairs but ONLY if the surrounding metal is completely rust-free when it's applied. Cleaning up is by far the most important part of the job.
Posted by: Paula, February 23, 2017, 9:31am; Reply: 432
OK got it.

I assume a proper job is roof off and rust cut out and metal welded in? That sounds very expensive. But i hate to think it'll get worse if i dont
Posted by: Paula, February 23, 2017, 9:32am; Reply: 433
Quoted from JohnD


Your other name must be Schroedinger?

John


Or is it?
Posted by: Paula, February 23, 2017, 9:32am; Reply: 434
Quoted from Mark Hammond
Nothing lasts forever.........

M.


Oh dear.....
Posted by: Stuart Wilson, February 23, 2017, 12:20pm; Reply: 435
do a temp/bodge type repair now, use and enjoy the car in the spring and summer then have it repaired correctly over next winter
Posted by: Paula, February 23, 2017, 3:59pm; Reply: 436
Quoted from cliftyhanger


Sorry for any misunderstanding.
The "Fibral" filler is a fibreglass filler which has strands as part of it, quite easy to use and is mixed with hardener. No Mat required.

The PU is a sealant type product, a bit like silicone except stringer and stickier (you have been warned!) but is flexible. You can apply a skim over the top of the fibreglass to give a tough "skin" that can be painted. PU is the stuff modern car manufacturers use as a seam sealer or indeed to stick panels together.
PU40 is fairly cheap and available at Toolstation......everybody has one near them!



What about after the rust removal and before the Fibral?
Posted by: cliftyhanger, February 23, 2017, 4:32pm; Reply: 437
If you wish some "rust killer" of whatever flavour takes your fancy.....
Otherwise just clean bare metal
Posted by: ferny, February 23, 2017, 5:10pm; Reply: 438
http://www.halfords.com/motoring/paints-body-repair/adhesives/plastic-padding-chemical-metal-560ml

I much prefer that stuff over fibreglass.
Posted by: Richard B, February 23, 2017, 5:31pm; Reply: 439
Quoted from Paula

I assume a proper job is roof off and rust cut out and metal welded in?



The roof unbolts (relatively easily). People have been know to drive the Saloon Herald during the summer as a DIY (roofless) open top car. Two or three people to lift the roof off though.
Posted by: Steve P, February 23, 2017, 5:36pm; Reply: 440
Quoted from ferny


I used that to reconstruct the whole underside of a rusty petrol tank on a Suzuki GP125 i had years ago,great stuff.
S

Posted by: Nick Jones, February 23, 2017, 6:39pm; Reply: 441
Quoted from Richard B



The roof unbolts (relatively easily). People have been know to drive the Saloon Herald during the summer as a DIY (roofless) open top car. Two or three people to lift the roof off though.


Yes, the roof would need to come off to repair that properly.  It comes off pretty easily and quickly.  Two people are enough provided they are not really short.  Not heavy, but awkward and long arms help - plus the side windows need to be caught.  Putting it back on properly is a bit more involved but still not difficult.

You can indeed temporarily "convert" your saloon, though these days the insurance consequences of getting caught would be probably be very nasty.  You'd also be best starting with a structurally sound car as although a saloon with no roof is not significantly different from a convertible (the hood bin and B pillar covers do damn all), when you take the roof off it can rather reveal a certain floppiness that the roof was disguising!  Self opening doors that double as non-opening doors dependent on the torsional loads applied are not ideal.

Also, if you leave your roof at the campsite and then go off for the day it's a good idea to be really quite confident of the forecast as the back seat passengers do get awfully wet in the rain  ;D  Happy days......

Nick
Posted by: Paula, February 23, 2017, 7:08pm; Reply: 442
Bit worried about this mesh in this picture
Posted by: Paula, February 23, 2017, 7:28pm; Reply: 443
Anyone any idea's on the cost of a proper repair? I can't weld at all and i don't have a garage to work in either.
I'm worried that this is something i need to start taking much more seriously.
Posted by: DaveKent, February 23, 2017, 7:29pm; Reply: 444
Don't worry about it,- it's just a car! A lot of bits of metal stuck together, so they can all be replaced one way or another!  Heralds are quite simple, the limits are only down to ability and bank balance!
Just seal it up and use it this year, then see how everything is later on!
Posted by: Paula, February 23, 2017, 7:31pm; Reply: 445
Quoted from DaveKent
Don't worry about it,- it's just a car! A lot of bits of metal stuck together, so they can all be replaced one way or another!  Heralds are quite simple, the limits are only down to ability and bank balance!
Just seal it up and use it this year, then see how everything is later on!


This has made me feel a lot better! To Halfords and Beyond!
Posted by: Paula, February 23, 2017, 7:42pm; Reply: 446
Quoted from Nick Jones


Yes, the roof would need to come off to repair that properly.  It comes off pretty easily and quickly.  Two people are enough provided they are not really short.  Not heavy, but awkward and long arms help - plus the side windows need to be caught.  Putting it back on properly is a bit more involved but still not difficult.

You can indeed temporarily "convert" your saloon, though these days the insurance consequences of getting caught would be probably be very nasty.  You'd also be best starting with a structurally sound car as although a saloon with no roof is not significantly different from a convertible (the hood bin and B pillar covers do damn all), when you take the roof off it can rather reveal a certain floppiness that the roof was disguising!  Self opening doors that double as non-opening doors dependent on the torsional loads applied are not ideal.

Also, if you leave your roof at the campsite and then go off for the day it's a good idea to be really quite confident of the forecast as the back seat passengers do get awfully wet in the rain  ;D  Happy days......

Nick


The 'Can do' attitude of this club is amazing.
Posted by: Dogsbody47uk, February 23, 2017, 7:48pm; Reply: 447
If you want to run a Herald or Vitesse a "can do" attitude is a must. Cheers, Dave :)
Posted by: Paula, February 23, 2017, 7:53pm; Reply: 448
Ok i have my game plan!
Posted by: DaveKent, February 23, 2017, 8:04pm; Reply: 449
id start with the last first; then you'll still be smiling when you see what the brush will reveal!!  ;D!!!
Posted by: Paula, February 23, 2017, 8:29pm; Reply: 450
Quoted from DaveKent
id start with the last first; then you'll still be smiling when you see what the brush will reveal!!  ;D!!!


I'll bookend the day with 2
Posted by: Nick Jones, February 23, 2017, 8:35pm; Reply: 451
Quoted from Paula


The 'Can do' attitude of this club is amazing.


Heralds and Vitesses (and Spits and TRs) are just big kids meccano.  The roof is held on with 6 bolts and a big screw (which also holds the rear view mirror on).  We could get the roof off in 5 minutes flat.  Getting it back on took more like 20 though.

The mesh you mention further up is an unpromising sign and may indicate further rot in the seam that extends forward under the rear windows.  On the other hand it may just have been what was meant to support that great gob of filler further up, but which fell off instead.  Is it actually attached to anything?

That area isn't too bad to deal with provided you (or your repairist) are able to make your own repair sections as you can't buy them and most potential donors will have gone there as well.

Nick
Posted by: Nick Jones, February 23, 2017, 8:36pm; Reply: 452
Quoted from Paula


I'll bookend the day with 2


There's a risk you might want the second right after the wire brushing  :P

Nick
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 24, 2017, 7:58am; Reply: 453
Yes roof off is a  fine weather job,, there are 3 fixings at the front one as said holds the mirror two hide under the visor pivots  there some hopeless screws or pop rivets hold the top B post uoright in place and 3 nuts under the rear deck,   there is also some harness to things like interior lamp.
from memory up the A post and also down the n/s rear pillar

pete
Posted by: Paula, February 24, 2017, 1:37pm; Reply: 454
Quoted from Nick Jones


Heralds and Vitesses (and Spits and TRs) are just big kids meccano.  The roof is held on with 6 bolts and a big screw (which also holds the rear view mirror on).  We could get the roof off in 5 minutes flat.  Getting it back on took more like 20 though.

The mesh you mention further up is an unpromising sign and may indicate further rot in the seam that extends forward under the rear windows.  On the other hand it may just have been what was meant to support that great gob of filler further up, but which fell off instead.  Is it actually attached to anything?

That area isn't too bad to deal with provided you (or your repairist) are able to make your own repair sections as you can't buy them and most potential donors will have gone there as well.

Nick


I'll look further on my next day off on Monday (weather permitting). I assume putting new sections in will mean a respray or the area?
Posted by: Paula, February 24, 2017, 1:39pm; Reply: 455
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Yes roof off is a  fine weather job,, there are 3 fixings at the front one as said holds the mirror two hide under the visor pivots  there some hopeless screws or pop rivets hold the top B post uoright in place and 3 nuts under the rear deck,   there is also some harness to things like interior lamp.
from memory up the A post and also down the n/s rear pillar

pete


Ok, I'll see how i get on on Monday and maybe have the roof off in the summer. If i can convince a few mates to come around and help.
Posted by: daver clasper, February 24, 2017, 3:10pm; Reply: 456
Tell your mates, your having a roof party
Posted by: Paula, February 24, 2017, 3:28pm; Reply: 457
Quoted from daver clasper
Tell your mates, your having a roof party


Excellent
Posted by: Sheepy, February 24, 2017, 6:21pm; Reply: 458
Quoted from daver clasper
Tell your mates, your having a roof party


Tell your mates you want to take your top off!

Can they help,  ;)
Posted by: Paula, February 24, 2017, 7:22pm; Reply: 459
Quoted from Sheepy


Tell your mates you want to take your top off!

Can they help,  ;)


They won't fall for that again.
Posted by: herald948, February 24, 2017, 8:12pm; Reply: 460
Did we mention the potential for finding rot in the base of the roof itself...or are we trying to ease into all of this more gently? ;)
Posted by: Nick Jones, February 24, 2017, 8:33pm; Reply: 461
Quoted from herald948
Did we mention the potential for finding rot in the base of the roof itself...or are we trying to ease into all of this more gently? ;)


Oh man...... easy.....

N
Posted by: Paula, February 24, 2017, 8:34pm; Reply: 462
La la la la la la la la not listening!
Posted by: daver clasper, February 24, 2017, 9:32pm; Reply: 463
Thing is, it's hard to buy something that you know is really good (a known car/ documentation of resto work/honest low mileage, showing it's true colours,mothballed one). unless your lucky and then you will normally pay more.

So many of these old classics cars are running around with hidden bodges (stuff that may stop them getting worse= sort of ok bodge on hopefully non structural areas)) from over the years and folk still enjoy them, also without the stress of a great example deteriorating, if used a lot.

Depends on what you want, how much cash you have/time tools/facilities/skills, etc

Just some red wine philosophizing.





  
Posted by: Paula, February 24, 2017, 10:00pm; Reply: 464
Quoted from daver clasper
Thing is, it's hard to buy something that you know is really good (a known car/ documentation of resto work/honest low mileage, showing it's true colours,mothballed one). unless your lucky and then you will normally pay more.

So many of these old classics cars are running around with hidden bodges (stuff that may stop them getting worse= sort of ok bodge on hopefully non structural areas)) from over the years and folk still enjoy them, also without the stress of a great example deteriorating, if used a lot.

Depends on what you want, how much cash you have/time tools/facilities/skills, etc

Just some red wine philosophizing.

This is my only car and it lives on the road so i'm really just wanting to keep it going and looking nice. I also enjoy tinkering about, so at the moment it's perfect.
I'll probably kid myself for years that one day i'll restore it to better than new condition.




  


Posted by: Paula, February 24, 2017, 10:03pm; Reply: 465
Sorry made a mess of me quote there!

Should have just said
This is my only car and it lives on the road so i'm really just wanting to keep it going and looking nice. I also enjoy tinkering about, so at the moment it's perfect.
I'll probably kid myself for years that one day i'll restore it to better than new condition.
Posted by: DaveKent, February 24, 2017, 10:31pm; Reply: 466
Paula, Just use it and enjoy it; fix it when you need to; treat it like you would have done if you'd bought it when it was just another 5 or 6 year old car in the early 1970s.
......... and then when it's really tired you will have 2 choices!

If you make it fab now it will only deteriorate or someone will vandalise it if you leave it in the street, and then you'll be worried about leaving it places, and then you wont take it anywhere, then you'll resent it, and then............etc!!!!! >:(

Just keep it solid and presentable and you'll be happy!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 25, 2017, 9:43am; Reply: 467
I agree  good and usable puts a smile on,
there a enormouse range from compromise to utopia
some have big bugets and domt use them others have no buget and drive them everywhere
some race some drive like you stole it , others toodle about some like to park in a field with the bonnet up others drive to the coast for some decent fish and chips

classic ownership is purely what you want to get out of the hobby or necessity

But the Triumph smile takes some beating    do the best you are happy with
And drive  the car thats what they are for .

Holidays supermarkets , events or what ever

pete
Posted by: Paula, February 25, 2017, 6:16pm; Reply: 468
I'm totally sure where me and 'Feargal" sit now.
It's going to be a lovely labour of love for years to come. Even when i hate it.

I had a supermodel in the back the other day. She's normally in private jets and supercars. She said this was the coolest car she's ever been in.

She then spent the evening googling Vitesses.


Posted by: MDofTW, February 25, 2017, 8:35pm; Reply: 469
Well thank heavens you are back to liven up our lives! Would I be very lame, or thick, if I asked who the supermodel was?
Posted by: Paula, February 25, 2017, 9:51pm; Reply: 470
Quoted from MDofTW
Well thank heavens you are back to liven up our lives! Would I be very lame, or thick, if I asked who the supermodel was?


She's a friend of a friend. She's probably not really a supermodel, but she's been in loads of adverts and a few films. Her Name is Emilyne Mondo.
She's about 18' tall so i'm surprised she fit in!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, February 26, 2017, 7:49am; Reply: 471
With a her name im suprised she does prefer a Ford !!

Whats the next repair plan looming so we can all start to conjour a remedy  Ha

Pete
Posted by: Paula, February 26, 2017, 9:30am; Reply: 472
Quoted from Pete Lewis
With a her name im suprised she does prefer a Ford !!

Whats the next repair plan looming so we can all start to conjour a remedy  Ha

Pete


Took me a while to get that one!
next is attacking the boot with a wire brush
Posted by: Paula, March 4, 2017, 8:05pm; Reply: 473
The weather is stopping me sorting this rust and also filling the boot with water. Would drilling a couple holes in the boot be a terrible thing?
Posted by: dinger, March 4, 2017, 8:14pm; Reply: 474
Nope
Posted by: Pete Lewis, March 4, 2017, 8:16pm; Reply: 475
Get a snorkel kit for easter

Can you temporary use some duct tape on the outside to reduce the water entry ???

or something neat
pete
Posted by: Paula, March 4, 2017, 8:20pm; Reply: 476
There's always options
Posted by: Paula, March 4, 2017, 8:23pm; Reply: 477
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Get a snorkel kit for easter

Can you temporary use some duct tape on the outside to reduce the water entry ???

or something neat
pete


Maybe yeah.
Posted by: nang, March 5, 2017, 2:36am; Reply: 478
Get a mate with a torch to get in the boot, shut it and play a hose on it. Wait for the screams (naughty)
Tony.
Posted by: JohnD, March 5, 2017, 10:37am; Reply: 479
I think there are drain holes in the floor already, sealed with grommets.
Probably painted over.

John
Posted by: Paula, March 5, 2017, 8:15pm; Reply: 480
Quoted from JohnD
I think there are drain holes in the floor already, sealed with grommets.
Probably painted over.

John


I'll send the cat back in with a water diviner
Posted by: Nick Jones, March 5, 2017, 8:33pm; Reply: 481
Quoted from Paula


I'll send the cat back in with a water diviner


If it's been raining like it has here he'll been needing scuba gear not a divining stick.....

Nick
Posted by: Scimher, March 5, 2017, 11:06pm; Reply: 482
Quoted from Paula
There's always options


Years ago I used to go to a private outdoor summer party held every year - I can remember that one of the many quirky vehicles that turned up was a Mini pickup that had been converted into a Jacuzzi! It was heated by extended coolant hoses from the engine bay & was still a road going vehicle...
Posted by: Paula, March 6, 2017, 6:27pm; Reply: 483
Quoted from JohnD
I think there are drain holes in the floor already, sealed with grommets.
Probably painted over.

John


You think right!
Posted by: Nick Jones, March 6, 2017, 8:17pm; Reply: 484
You even have a floor to have grommet holes in!  Impressive!  :P

Nick
Posted by: Paula, March 6, 2017, 8:35pm; Reply: 485
Quoted from Nick Jones
You even have a floor to have grommet holes in!  Impressive!  :P

Nick


Its also solid under the spare!
I'm the luckiest girl in the world!
Posted by: Paula, March 7, 2017, 2:00pm; Reply: 486
Well that got sticky!
Just waiting for the white PU40 to go off and then i'll roughly sand it and paint the whole boot.
Posted by: Paula, March 7, 2017, 2:00pm; Reply: 487
And the white messy stuff
Posted by: Paula, March 7, 2017, 5:22pm; Reply: 488
One thing that sprung to mind as i spent most of the day in the boot was that i don't have a tool kit or jack.
Any recommendations?
Posted by: Pete Lewis, March 7, 2017, 6:01pm; Reply: 489
Lidl have trolley jacks at £19

and aldi have cheap and comprehensive first aid kit for travel/car/home

Tool kit keep it simple
Aldi had combination spanners  for metric and af for 4.99
pair of pliers
postidrive 1 and 2 screwdrivers
Slotted screw drivers
length of electric wire
spare bulb box.
few cable ties
soft wire to tie things up if the fall off

torch or 12v lead lamp
Bottle of wine


pete

Posted by: JohnD, March 7, 2017, 6:16pm; Reply: 490
Special Offer: http://us14.campaign-archive2.com/?u=089b9649974bc959ee24b4270&id=4b15e69cf5&e=ef04c1316f

Or, go to Halfords, and look at their Advanced range.  These tools are of an extremely high quality and carry a lifetime guarantee!
IMHO they are the best you can get, below Snap-On or Bluetip, which are FAR more expensive.
http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_10001_catalogId_14552_productId_1183543_langId_-1_categoryId_null

But wait for the frequent special offers, or else register with Halfords and get a Trade Card for regular discounts.
You do NOT need to be in the Motor Trade!

John
Posted by: daver clasper, March 7, 2017, 6:19pm; Reply: 491
Tools
spanners + adjustable, long nose/normal pliers, stanley blade, screwdriver with those different heads.

First aid kit
coat hanger wire, thin wire, bit of electric cable, cable ties, bit of sandpaper.

spares
rotor arm, condenser, points, HT lead (old one), couple of spark plugs (old ones). dizzy cap (old one).

Bit anal all that, but do some long trips and if a holiday, may save some domestic disharmony.

Also bought quite a sturdy warning triangle for £2 from a tat store (it's an age thing)    
Posted by: Paula, March 7, 2017, 6:22pm; Reply: 492
I'm thinking i probably have enough spare tools around to make up most of that list, i never have spare wine though!
Is a scissor jack ok? Like this one?
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/172475385086

And will this wheel brace fit the 11/16 nut? 17mm
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/131648190843

Big fan of Halfords. I bought my ratchet combination spanners there. They are lovely.
Posted by: Paula, March 7, 2017, 6:23pm; Reply: 493
Quoted from daver clasper
Tools
spanners + adjustable, long nose/normal pliers, stanley blade, screwdriver with those different heads.

First aid kit
coat hanger wire, thin wire, bit of electric cable, cable ties, bit of sandpaper.

spares
rotor arm, condenser, points, HT lead (old one), couple of spark plugs (old ones). dizzy cap (old one).

Bit anal all that, but do some long trips and if a holiday, may save some domestic disharmony.

Also bought quite a sturdy warning triangle for £2 from a tat store (it's an age thing)    


I've got the old plugs and leads and stuff from when i changed it all. I'll pop them in too
Posted by: Paula, March 7, 2017, 6:34pm; Reply: 494
Talking of Halfords.

http://www.halfords.com/workshop-tools/tools/tool-kits/halfords-motorists-tool-kit
Posted by: RobPearce, March 7, 2017, 7:14pm; Reply: 495
Quoted from Paula
I'm thinking i probably have enough spare tools around to make up most of that list, i never have spare wine though!
Is a scissor jack ok? Like this one?
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/172475385086

For carrying in the boot, a scissor jack was the original equipment. Be aware that many of the cheap ones (like that eBay item) have very mixed reviews, largely very poor from people that have actually used them. A trolley jack is a much more effective tool and much easier to use... but much less convenient to just carry around as a matter of course.

Quoted from Paula
And will this wheel brace fit the 11/16 nut? 17mm
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/131648190843

No. You really need a proper, imperial size (11/16") brace or socket and bar.

Quoted from Paula
Big fan of Halfords. I bought my ratchet combination spanners there. They are lovely.

Hmm... bought my original socket set from Halfords... have had to replace all the frequently used ones (9/16", 11/16" etc.) and the ratchet, because all of them broke in normal use.
Posted by: Paula, March 7, 2017, 7:24pm; Reply: 496
Ok good to know!
Posted by: Paula, March 7, 2017, 7:28pm; Reply: 497
Quoted from RobPearce

No. You really need a proper, imperial size (11/16") brace or socket and bar.


Bit thin on the ground them. There are some lovely rusty ones on ebay though
Posted by: Paula, March 7, 2017, 7:29pm; Reply: 498
Here's a beauty though!
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/302240970242
Posted by: ferny, March 7, 2017, 8:42pm; Reply: 499
Quoted from Paula


That's crap.

Only carry what is of use and will work. Trolley jack is pointless as it'll fill the boot and won't always go under a car with a flat tyre. Grab an OEM scissor jack off a car in a scrapyard.

Don't use metric spanners on imperial nuts. Just... No. Get a good set of ring spanners and a small socket set. Half decent pliers and side cutters. Old spark plugs and old points known to be working but replaced as part of a service is wise. One or two generic HT leads or the longest two from a swap. Short bit of random wire and cable ties. Wind up torch is more than useful. Bulbs, too. Jump leads which you'll use on more cars than yours.

Bottom line. If you're not going to use it, replace it or risk buggering it up at the side of the road in the rain, then don't carry it.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, March 7, 2017, 8:44pm; Reply: 500
http://www.halfords.com/workshop-tools/tools/spanners-wrenches/halfords-advanced-9-piece--ratchet-spanner-set

these are super tools and the metric sizes will fit most of the AF sizes on your triumph

11 = 7/16
13 = 1/2
14 = 9/16
And so on


In 54 year of driving I have only needed recovery once in the Vit6 when the diff front mount bolts unscrewed and jammed the prop shaft

have faith in your car and travel light with just a few bits to aid simple failures
if spmething daft happens you wont have anything to fix it
Posted by: ferny, March 7, 2017, 8:55pm; Reply: 501
These two sets will get you out of most trouble, will last years, will be your most used in and out of the car and are bloody cheap. They're what I've used myself for over ten years. I've only snapped one socket in half...

http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductMobileDisplay?catalogId=10151&langId=-1&categoryId=255215&productId=163049&storeId=10001

http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductMobileDisplay?catalogId=10151&langId=-1&categoryId=255215&productId=164275&storeId=10001

Have a look at toolstation as well for stuff made by Todays Tools. Very cheap and high quality. Mainly plumbing gear though.
Posted by: Paula, March 7, 2017, 8:57pm; Reply: 502
Quoted from ferny


That's crap.

Only carry what is of use and will work. Trolley jack is pointless as it'll fill the boot and won't always go under a car with a flat tyre. Grab an OEM scissor jack off a car in a scrapyard.

Don't use metric spanners on imperial nuts. Just... No. Get a good set of ring spanners and a small socket set. Half decent pliers and side cutters. Old spark plugs and old points known to be working but replaced as part of a service is wise. One or two generic HT leads or the longest two from a swap. Short bit of random wire and cable ties. Wind up torch is more than useful. Bulbs, too. Jump leads which you'll use on more cars than yours.

Bottom line. If you're not going to use it, replace it or risk buggering it up at the side of the road in the rain, then don't carry it.


I've got all that already, apart from the jack. I was just looking for something to keep in the boot and i'd rather not have my spanners and socket set in there all the time.
I'll put a tool roll together with some some of my old bits and bobs.
I like the scrappy jack idea. God knows how many i've sent there over the years!
Posted by: JohnD, March 7, 2017, 9:22pm; Reply: 503
Paula,
Those scissor jacks that have a hook on the end of the handle and ring on the jackscrew, are a PITA.
Turning is hard work, and ther only advantage is that the 'hook/eye' acts as a primitive universal joint, I think so people don't have to bend down - but they do, anyway.
Far better is one with a hexagon head and socket to mate together, like this one: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/351179981596?lpid=122&chn=ps&adgroupid=36165537022&rlsatarget=pla-277568690110&adtype=pla&poi=&googleloc=9046580&device=c&campaignid=738474636&crdt=0

It comes with its own ratchet, which may not be much use without an extension, so you can reach it.

And, if I may, work out where under the car you can place the jack!  I wont teach a wise perosn like you just where, but it's useful to have an idea in advance of what is a strong point.

John
Posted by: heraldcoupe, March 7, 2017, 9:55pm; Reply: 504
Quoted from Paula
Big fan of Halfords. I bought my ratchet combination spanners there. They are lovely.


Their 'Advanced' tools are truly excellent. They were formerly branded as their 'Professional' series, I had a 3/8" drive socket set from them in front line use for nearly 20 years, recently replaced due to loss of so many parts, rather than breakage. The tools are guaranteed for life with the exception of moving parts, primarily the ratchet mechanisms. These are rebuildable with a very reasonably pirced set of parts - when I rebuilt mine I found the only parts whiche were unserviceable were the springs.

I've recently purchased one of these sets, and it's every bit as good as the original, just a bit bigger
http://www.halfords.com/workshop-tools/tools/socket-sets/halfords-advanced-200-piece-socket-and-ratchet-spanner-set

Cheers,
Bill.
Posted by: JohnD, March 7, 2017, 10:36pm; Reply: 505
There's a recommendation!
Posted by: Paula, March 8, 2017, 9:03am; Reply: 506
I've already got these and a full socket set.
I also have the remnants of a tool set i got when i was 18 (a long time ago) at my mothers house. I'll try and get those together and keep them in the boot.
Just a basic set is all i need. Anything major and i'll get the RAC.
I know from my scootering days that a few bits and pieces can save hours waiting in the rain!
Posted by: Mark Hammond, March 8, 2017, 7:13pm; Reply: 507
Most of my kit is either Snap On or Bluepoint (Snap On's cheaper cousin) but Halfraud's Professional spanners/sockets are very good indeed.

Mark
Posted by: Paula, March 8, 2017, 7:24pm; Reply: 508
I did an apprenticeship in a bus garage when i was younger (always been a bit odd) and the Snap on van would come around and tempt you.
They used to have a general rule of £1 per mm on the spanners.
Too much for me back then and now!  
Posted by: Pete Lewis, March 8, 2017, 7:27pm; Reply: 509
I have some snap on posidrives and they are made of chocholate, they have replaced them 3 times I dont bother any more,  the old  blue handled  stanley  go on and on and on ,  

pete
Posted by: Paula, March 8, 2017, 7:37pm; Reply: 510
My old tool box at work is not looking too promising.
Posted by: Matt306, March 8, 2017, 9:47pm; Reply: 511
Quoted from Paula
I'm thinking i probably have enough spare tools around to make up most of that list, i never have spare wine though!
Is a scissor jack ok? Like this one?
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/172475385086

And will this wheel brace fit the 11/16 nut? 17mm
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/131648190843

Big fan of Halfords. I bought my ratchet combination spanners there. They are lovely.


If you are going to be shopping at Halfords try clicking through Quidco.com for cashback 5% if you register a debit card and 3% for online. Over the years I have earnt over £400 cashback just for buying what i would have brought anyway.

Posted by: Paula, March 9, 2017, 12:32am; Reply: 512
Quoted from Matt306


If you are going to be shopping at Halfords try clicking through Quidco.com for cashback 5% if you register a debit card and 3% for online. Over the years I have earnt over £400 cashback just for buying what i would have brought anyway.



Another top tip!
Posted by: Scimher, March 9, 2017, 10:39am; Reply: 513
Quoted from Paula
I did an apprenticeship in a bus garage when i was younger (always been a bit odd)...  


...It didn't do a certain Fuzz Townsend any harm - I believe that's how he started out...
Posted by: Paula, March 9, 2017, 1:22pm; Reply: 514
Quoted from ferny


That's crap.

Only carry what is of use and will work. Trolley jack is pointless as it'll fill the boot and won't always go under a car with a flat tyre. Grab an OEM scissor jack off a car in a scrapyard.

Don't use metric spanners on imperial nuts. Just... No. Get a good set of ring spanners and a small socket set. Half decent pliers and side cutters. Old spark plugs and old points known to be working but replaced as part of a service is wise. One or two generic HT leads or the longest two from a swap. Short bit of random wire and cable ties. Wind up torch is more than useful. Bulbs, too. Jump leads which you'll use on more cars than yours.

Bottom line. If you're not going to use it, replace it or risk buggering it up at the side of the road in the rain, then don't carry it.


I went to the local scrap yard and he pulled out a rusty oily weird looking thing and said £5?
I said, don't you have a nicer unused one from a car tool kit?
He said he has but he's not got any of the handles....... Very weird.
So i went to Halfords and bought something completely different. Mainly because it's smaller than a scissor jack, but also because its yellow and cute! It's only 18cm tall, but goes up to 34.5cm.

I've just washed the car with loads of water and i just got a small blob of water in the corner, so i'm calling that job done.


Posted by: RobPearce, March 9, 2017, 5:36pm; Reply: 515
Bottle jacks like that are good... as long as they fit under. Here's a cautionary tale from my youth...

When I was young, dad bought an old motor-caravan (a Comma Wanderer, if you care that much). The original jacks were tall, crank-handled affairs with a side-rod to slot into reinforced holes in the sills. They were big, bulky... and broken. So before we set off on holiday to France, dad tested out an alternative consisting of a crow-bar and a long-reach bottle jack. It worked great if resting on blocks.

Mid-holiday, we woke up in the morning to find the van leaning slightly. A quick check outside showed that one of the tyres was completely flat. No problem, we'd tested our solution. Unfortunately, we'd tested with inflated tyres. With a flat, the bottle jack didn't fit under, nor have the reach needed if arranged differently.

Luckily, we'd also packed, just in case, a scissor jack from a Renault 20. That would fit, even with a breeze-block to give the required full height. So we were able to remove the tyre. At which point the breeze-block split in half, the crowbar bent and the van sank onto its brake drum... but that's a whole different cautionary tale ;)
Posted by: Paula, March 9, 2017, 6:48pm; Reply: 516
Quoted from RobPearce
Bottle jacks like that are good... as long as they fit under. Here's a cautionary tale from my youth...

When I was young, dad bought an old motor-caravan (a Comma Wanderer, if you care that much). The original jacks were tall, crank-handled affairs with a side-rod to slot into reinforced holes in the sills. They were big, bulky... and broken. So before we set off on holiday to France, dad tested out an alternative consisting of a crow-bar and a long-reach bottle jack. It worked great if resting on blocks.

Mid-holiday, we woke up in the morning to find the van leaning slightly. A quick check outside showed that one of the tyres was completely flat. No problem, we'd tested our solution. Unfortunately, we'd tested with inflated tyres. With a flat, the bottle jack didn't fit under, nor have the reach needed if arranged differently.

Luckily, we'd also packed, just in case, a scissor jack from a Renault 20. That would fit, even with a breeze-block to give the required full height. So we were able to remove the tyre. At which point the breeze-block split in half, the crowbar bent and the van sank onto its brake drum... but that's a whole different cautionary tale ;)


After reading that i popped outside and it doesn't fit under! I feel rather dumb.
But also comforted that i'm not the first!
Back to the shop with it then!
Posted by: Paula, March 9, 2017, 6:53pm; Reply: 517
Here's a quicky though.
The horn button keeps popping off as the plunger is pushing it off.
Is there an adjustment i could make? I've tried squishing down the contact on the back of the button.
Posted by: Paula, March 9, 2017, 6:57pm; Reply: 518
This is what the plunger looks like.
Posted by: Richard B, March 9, 2017, 7:08pm; Reply: 519
I think the outside of the cap should have a wire spring. This is why it keeps popping off  8)
Posted by: Pete Lewis, March 9, 2017, 7:12pm; Reply: 520
http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/SearchCmd?srch=scissor+jack&action=search&storeId=10001&catalogId=10151&langId=-1

Just  bit of historic stuff on Robs  Commer , we had to test theside mounted screw jack by fully loading the vans and jack to max height and leave it 2 days , to test them
neve had one fail but it made your eyes water ,

the brass contact on the button should be flat

and depending on which stg,  wheels there are short and long brush plungers

Generally there should be a wire expanding nasty circlip wich sort of grips the hole in the wheel

pinging out horn push is almost normal  Ha

halfords list two scissors



Pete
Posted by: Paula, March 9, 2017, 7:16pm; Reply: 521
It has the wire spring bit opposite the plunger. I'll just keep pushing it back in!
Posted by: Casper, March 9, 2017, 7:24pm; Reply: 522
Apart from the spring on the circumference of the button assembly
http://www.triumphexp.com/phile/8/17784/SD531554.JPG

you should have a three pronged retaining spring held under the big nut.
http://www.triumphexp.com/phile/8/17752/204741.jpg
which engages in the cutouts on the button assembly

A link to elsewhere in Triumph land.
http://www.triumphexp.com/phorum/read.php?8,886100

C.
Posted by: Paula, March 9, 2017, 7:47pm; Reply: 523
Quoted from Casper
Apart from the spring on the circumference of the button assembly
http://www.triumphexp.com/phile/8/17784/SD531554.JPG

you should have a three pronged retaining spring held under the big nut.
http://www.triumphexp.com/phile/8/17752/204741.jpg
which engages in the cutouts on the button assembly

A link to elsewhere in Triumph land.
http://www.triumphexp.com/phorum/read.php?8,886100

C.



HURRAH!!!!
Thank you!
Posted by: Matt306, March 9, 2017, 10:14pm; Reply: 524
Quoted from Casper


you should have a three pronged retaining spring held under the big nut.
http://www.triumphexp.com/phile/8/17752/204741.jpg
which engages in the cutouts on the button assembly



Yep you are missing the three pronged spring
Posted by: Paula, March 10, 2017, 4:00pm; Reply: 525
I was just thinking how nice it was that i had such trivial things to worry about when i came out this morning to a puddle of oil.
About 8" across
I'm going to take him to the garage down the road to put up on the ramp to have a look.
Eeeeeeeeek
Posted by: Nick Jones, March 10, 2017, 4:42pm; Reply: 526
That does sound like a bit more than the usual "territory marking"  :-/

Nick
Posted by: Hogie, March 10, 2017, 5:33pm; Reply: 527


Hi Paula,
            that's a nasty 'blackman's pinch' you have there.

If the jack does not fit under the car when the tyres are pumped up imagine the situation when you have a flat.
On my 4A I found that the standard scissor jack fitted with a flat tyre but being fully compressed/lower it was a devil to raise (dark windy and wet night)
I bought an electric scissor jack off ebay.  It works a treat. It is excellent for helping get the gearbox in and out.

Roger
Posted by: Paula, March 10, 2017, 6:54pm; Reply: 528
Quoted from Nick Jones
That does sound like a bit more than the usual "territory marking"  :-/

Nick


Love it
Posted by: Paula, March 10, 2017, 6:56pm; Reply: 529
Quoted from Hogie


Hi Paula,
            that's a nasty 'blackman's pinch' you have there.

If the jack does not fit under the car when the tyres are pumped up imagine the situation when you have a flat.
On my 4A I found that the standard scissor jack fitted with a flat tyre but being fully compressed/lower it was a devil to raise (dark windy and wet night)
I bought an electric scissor jack off ebay.  It works a treat. It is excellent for helping get the gearbox in and out.

Roger


I'm going to swap it for the scissor jack at halfords and be done with it. Electric sounds a bit too reliant on electricity for my liking!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, March 10, 2017, 7:20pm; Reply: 530
Quick idea on oil puddles  
if its black its engine oil and if its smells like cats pee its gearbox or diff

lets hope the puddle came from some other car  you just parked over it

pete
Posted by: Paula, March 10, 2017, 7:22pm; Reply: 531
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Quick idea on oil puddles  
if its black its engine oil and if its smells like cats pee its gearbox or diff

lets hope the puddle came from some other car  you just parked over it

pete


Unfortunately it was very fresh and very black. I didn't smell it.
Posted by: daver clasper, March 10, 2017, 11:32pm; Reply: 532
Quoted from Hogie


Hi Paula,
            that's a nasty 'blackman's pinch' you have there.

If the jack does not fit under the car when the tyres are pumped up imagine the situation when you have a flat.
On my 4A I found that the standard scissor jack fitted with a flat tyre but being fully compressed/lower it was a devil to raise (dark windy and wet night)
I bought an electric scissor jack off ebay.  It works a treat. It is excellent for helping get the gearbox in and out.

Roger

I'm a black man. What is the nasty "black mans pinch" we do. i would would like some understanding of this please.

Dave

Posted by: DaveKent, March 11, 2017, 8:24am; Reply: 533
oh dear!  :-/
Posted by: yeti2, March 11, 2017, 9:24am; Reply: 534
Quoted from daver clasper

I'm a black man. What is the nasty "black mans pinch" we do. i would would like some understanding of this please.

Dave



it's a 'blood blister'  :)
Posted by: daver clasper, March 11, 2017, 11:41am; Reply: 535
Quoted from yeti2


it's a 'blood blister'  :)


Oh. That's nice to know then!.

Posted by: Paula, March 11, 2017, 1:55pm; Reply: 536
Turns out i didn't have an oil leak at all (apart from the usual seepage). It was a petrol leak that was washing the oil off the engine on it's way down.
Nice cheap fix!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, March 11, 2017, 4:31pm; Reply: 537
its good when a disaster turns into a nice easy cheap fix,  now you have enough pocket money left for a Bottle of wine

Pete
Posted by: Paula, March 11, 2017, 7:04pm; Reply: 538
Quoted from Pete Lewis
its good when a disaster turns into a nice easy cheap fix,  now you have enough pocket money left for a Bottle of wine

Pete


Perfect!
Posted by: Paula, March 11, 2017, 7:11pm; Reply: 539
Really impressed with Fallsbrooke Motors in Streatham if anyone's in the area. They even have the vacuum tool to balance your carbs.
They even had a 1.9 peugeot 205 in there today!
Posted by: Mark Hammond, March 11, 2017, 10:42pm; Reply: 540
Quoted from Paula
Really impressed with Fallsbrooke Motors in Streatham if anyone's in the area. They even have the vacuum tool to balance your carbs.
They even had a 1.9 peugeot 205 in there today!


Back in the day I was Sales Director for a leading Peugeot/Citroen dealer group and ran those 1.9 205 GTI's as demo cars.  They were fabulous!  I had more GTI's as company cars than you could shake a sh1tty stick at!!!   Better still was the 309 GTI.  Better handling and I used a prototype 16v RHD version for evaluation for 20000 miles which sadly never went into production in RHD form.

M.
Posted by: Paula, March 13, 2017, 7:28pm; Reply: 541
I've fitted my horn clip. That did the trick.
Now i have a squeak from the steering column.
Does the fun ever end?
I'll pop the wheel off and have a look.
Posted by: Sheepy, March 13, 2017, 7:32pm; Reply: 542
The fun only just began when you bought a Triumph! 😀
Posted by: Matt306, March 13, 2017, 9:32pm; Reply: 543
Quoted from Paula
I've fitted my horn clip. That did the trick.
Now i have a squeak from the steering column.
Does the fun ever end?
I'll pop the wheel off and have a look.


My steering wheel developed a squeak  I cured it by turning the radio up or dropping the hood.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, March 14, 2017, 9:00am; Reply: 544
A little grease on the horn brush ring
a squirt of oil down the column to lube the top bush
Make sure the wheel is not too close or touching the switch cowl

pete
Posted by: Paula, March 14, 2017, 12:46pm; Reply: 545
Quoted from Pete Lewis
A little grease on the horn brush ring
a squirt of oil down the column to lube the top bush
Make sure the wheel is not too close or touching the switch cowl

pete


Ok. Thanks!
Posted by: Paula, March 14, 2017, 6:45pm; Reply: 546
Quoted from Sheepy
The fun only just began when you bought a Triumph! 😀


I get that now!
Posted by: Paula, April 4, 2017, 6:28pm; Reply: 547
Pretty good haul from the Classic Car and Restoration show on Sunday.
Not sure where i'm going to put the union jacks. Thought they might look nice at the bottom of the front wings by the bonnet locks.
Just looking for an original gear knob now.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, April 5, 2017, 7:05am; Reply: 548
If youre unsure where to put ,  use some tape or double sided  to play first before you drill any holes !!
Posted by: Paula, April 10, 2017, 9:42am; Reply: 549
I went for here.
Posted by: JohnD, April 10, 2017, 10:31am; Reply: 550
It'll get DIRTY here, Paula!

A BIG one is good, maybe best on British Racing Green:

(Pic courtesy of Mark Baldock)

JOhn
Posted by: JohnD, April 10, 2017, 10:33am; Reply: 551
It'll get DIRTY there, Paula!

A BIG one is good, maybe best on British Racing Green:

(Pic courtesy of Mark Baldock)

JOhn
Posted by: Paula, April 10, 2017, 3:32pm; Reply: 552
Quoted from JohnD
It'll get DIRTY there, Paula!

A BIG one is good, maybe best on British Racing Green:

(Pic courtesy of Mark Baldock)

JOhn


Not with my washing and polishing obsession!
Posted by: Llessur, April 11, 2017, 4:59am; Reply: 553
Little bit of Waxoyl or touch-up paint around the drilled holes to prevent rusting?
Posted by: Paula, April 11, 2017, 2:38pm; Reply: 554
Quoted from Llessur
Little bit of Waxoyl or touch-up paint around the drilled holes to prevent rusting?


Good idea
Posted by: mole42, April 11, 2017, 7:08pm; Reply: 555
Quoted from Paula


Not with my washing and polishing obsession!


Would you like to clean a Stag?

Sorry, that sounds rude. But my Stag does need to meet someone who has more of an interest in cleaning and polishing thasn I do!!
Posted by: Paula, April 18, 2017, 5:38pm; Reply: 556
Quoted from mole42


Would you like to clean a Stag?

Sorry, that sounds rude. But my Stag does need to meet someone who has more of an interest in cleaning and polishing thasn I do!!


I'll get me marigolds!
Posted by: Paula, April 18, 2017, 5:45pm; Reply: 557
My heating has been stuck on since i got the car, which is now getting a bit warm!
I assume it's the heater valve as it moves fine when i pull push the control. Before i buy a new one, is it plumbed in correctly?
Cheers!
Posted by: Paula, April 18, 2017, 6:13pm; Reply: 558
I'm a little confused by this picture from the workshop manual
Posted by: Nick Jones, April 18, 2017, 6:15pm; Reply: 559
Looks correct.  It's quite possible that the heater valve is knackered but are you sure that the heat is actually coming from the heater and is not just hot air from the engine bay finding it's way past the tunnel cover?

Also, in my experience the new heater valves are a bit rubbish as the diaphragms are made out of some kind of pretend rubber that is not fit for purpose and splits after a few months leading to leaks.

Nick

Edit, that last pic shows an early 1600 with the Solex carbs which are, err, different.
Posted by: Paula, April 18, 2017, 6:19pm; Reply: 560
Quoted from Nick Jones
Looks correct.  It's quite possible that the heater valve is knackered but are you sure that the heat is actually coming from the heater and is not just hot air from the engine bay finding it's way past the tunnel cover?

Also, in my experience the new heater valves are a bit rubbish as the diaphragms are made out of some kind of pretend rubber that is not fit for purpose and splits after a few months leading to leaks.

Nick

Edit, that last pic shows an early 1600 with the Solex carbs which are, err, different.


It is very hot. I'll check the valve before replacing then, I was thinking it's only about £20 so i might as well, but if the replacement could be worse it's worth checking.

Thanks for explaining about the picture!
Posted by: glang, April 18, 2017, 9:28pm; Reply: 561
Hi, yes do have a good look at the valve because it sounds like its not just passing but stuck full open. Im not sure but the internals might be sprung so that even though the cable operated mechanism is moving its the spring that closes the valve. Then either muck inside the valve or corrosion of the externals may be preventing it from closing. Unfortunately I dont think it can be dismantled so its down to cleaning, WD40 and moving it back and forward.....
Posted by: Paula, April 18, 2017, 9:51pm; Reply: 562
Quoted from glang
Hi, yes do have a good look at the valve because it sounds like its not just passing but stuck full open. Im not sure but the internals might be sprung so that even though the cable operated mechanism is moving its the spring that closes the valve. Then either muck inside the valve or corrosion of the externals may be preventing it from closing. Unfortunately I dont think it can be dismantled so its down to cleaning, WD40 and moving it back and forward.....


I'll take it off and try it with the WD40 next week.
Thanks!
I'll let you know.
Posted by: JensH, April 19, 2017, 8:21am; Reply: 563
You can dismantle them, but be ware for escaping small parts  :)
Just drill out the rivet - and turn the lower part from the top.
Posted by: daver clasper, April 19, 2017, 8:30am; Reply: 564
You can take them apart (article on the net somewhere (maybe Buckeye triumph?). I did this, though couldn't track down the diaphragm as mine was leaking and I don't think it's got separate Triumph part no from the valve.

I ended up buying a new valve from an engineering place up North that makes them (prob supplies all the retail outlets). Been fine for 3 and half years. They advised that leaving in open position when not using car makes them last longer. Let me know if you want contact details for them.  

You should, I think be able to tell if valve is open, if the outlet hose is hot.

I by passed the heater with one of existing hoses when messing about with it so could still use car.

Never use heater as car is warm from engine heat coming in anyway.

Dave  
Posted by: daver clasper, April 19, 2017, 8:38am; Reply: 565
Quoted from JensH
You can dismantle them, but be ware for escaping small parts  :)
Just drill out the rivet - and turn the lower part from the top.

I think it's best to mark the original position of 2 parts before you separate them


Posted by: Pete Lewis, April 19, 2017, 8:45am; Reply: 566
beware there is a rubber olive which seals the valve to the stubby pipe sticking out the heater
canley  A147   or   Rimmers C9928A     worth having a spare ready,  you can cut /shape one from a slice of heater hose if desperate !!!

its a simple valve with diaphragm and plunger which does get full of  crud and also rubber fails which stops closing off ,, worth playing to strip it down just to see how it all goes ,

while its off withdraw the cable and grease it up,  they go very rusty where the cable passes the heater intake , its not a sealed casing and water gets inside over the years

pete
Posted by: Paula, April 19, 2017, 9:56am; Reply: 567
Quoted from daver clasper
You can take them apart (article on the net somewhere (maybe Buckeye triumph?). I did this, though couldn't track down the diaphragm as mine was leaking and I don't think it's got separate Triumph part no from the valve.

I ended up buying a new valve from an engineering place up North that makes them (prob supplies all the retail outlets). Been fine for 3 and half years. They advised that leaving in open position when not using car makes them last longer. Let me know if you want contact details for them.  

You should, I think be able to tell if valve is open, if the outlet hose is hot.

I by passed the heater with one of existing hoses when messing about with it so could still use car.

Never use heater as car is warm from engine heat coming in anyway.

Dave  


I was thinking of by passing for the summer, but it would be nice to have the option. I'm aware it'll never be cold in there!
I've ordered a valve just i can always send it back.
Posted by: Paula, April 24, 2017, 4:21pm; Reply: 568
Could i use some thin cardboard as a gasket on the heater valve? With some grease.
Posted by: JohnD, April 24, 2017, 6:43pm; Reply: 569
Yes, but look for n Halfords or similar for "gasket maker" instead of grease.  Its a silicone based stuff that cures in place.
Posted by: Nick Jones, April 24, 2017, 7:33pm; Reply: 570
Greased cardboard... No.  Silicone.... maybe.  There should actually be an O-ring in there which is squeezed onto the pipe by the opposing cone shapes formed in the heater valve itself and the mounting bracket.  New valves usually come with the O-ring and a new bracket.

Nick
Posted by: daver clasper, April 24, 2017, 7:59pm; Reply: 571
Hi

I can't remember/see, where a flat gasket would fitted on the Smiths H.V, as the water flow is through the inlet/outlet stubs.
Posted by: Nick Jones, April 24, 2017, 8:54pm; Reply: 572
There is no flat gasket, hence the need for an O-ring.

Nick
Posted by: Paula, April 25, 2017, 8:36am; Reply: 573
Quoted from JohnD
Yes, but look for n Halfords or similar for "gasket maker" instead of grease.  Its a silicone based stuff that cures in place.


I thought that stuff was frowned upon?
Posted by: Paula, April 25, 2017, 9:00am; Reply: 574
Quoted from Nick Jones
Greased cardboard... No.  Silicone.... maybe.  There should actually be an O-ring in there which is squeezed onto the pipe by the opposing cone shapes formed in the heater valve itself and the mounting bracket.  New valves usually come with the O-ring and a new bracket.

Nick


I've just been through the packaging (and the cat food as i'd put it in the bin). No O-ring.
I'm not convinced by the movement of the valve either. It sticks mid way and needs quite a bit of force to close it. I'll see how i get on.
Posted by: JohnD, April 25, 2017, 10:55am; Reply: 575
Quoted from Paula


I thought that stuff was frowned upon?


Yes, if you lay it on with a trowel.     A mere smear is correct.
John
Posted by: glang, April 25, 2017, 12:36pm; Reply: 576
Quoted from Paula


I've just been through the packaging (and the cat food as i'd put it in the bin). No O-ring.
I'm not convinced by the movement of the valve either. It sticks mid way and needs quite a bit of force to close it. I'll see how i get on.

Youre not having much luck on this one are you Paula! The new valve should close quite easily as its spring assisted and opening it is when some effort is needed so I'd return it if youre not 100% happy. You can then order the correct o-ring at the same time (assuming the original is past it) which you can see here:
http://www.jamespaddock.co.uk/heater-valve-seal-5

Posted by: Paula, April 25, 2017, 2:22pm; Reply: 577
Quoted from glang

Youre not having much luck on this one are you Paula! The new valve should close quite easily as its spring assisted and opening it is when some effort is needed so I'd return it if youre not 100% happy. You can then order the correct o-ring at the same time (assuming the original is past it) which you can see here:
http://www.jamespaddock.co.uk/heater-valve-seal-5



Thanks i've ordered the O-ring. The one in there had had it. I tried but it dripped. It's a shame about postage charges on these little items isn't it? £5!
any hoo. I have by passed the heater for now. I did manage to adjust the cable so it would put the valve closed (I think that's all it needed actually)
Hey Ho live and learn and all that!
I also fitted a new rocker cover gasket and re did the fuel pump oil gasket so it's been a good day.
Hopefully i've got that oil leak thats hiding from me!
Thanks!
Posted by: glang, April 25, 2017, 3:13pm; Reply: 578
Thats it one job at a time and the list might get shorter ??) And yes that postage charge is a killer so I normally order a few other consumables at the same time but its the road to ruin cos my lounge now looks like a Triumph spares dept.....
Posted by: Paula, April 25, 2017, 5:05pm; Reply: 579
I always find as soon as i order one little bit i need another!
The boot stay just came off the underside of the boot lid!!
Posted by: glang, April 25, 2017, 5:32pm; Reply: 580
Noooo that looks nasty! I think it may have been almost rusted through (or even previously snapped and bodged?) and was waiting to fail. Could be difficult to find a replacement so you might have an exciting opportunity to sharpen your metal fabrication skills :)
Posted by: Paula, April 25, 2017, 5:38pm; Reply: 581
Actually already ordered one Part 618192 on Canley. Found it in a thread on here from 2007!
About £20.
Probably could have made something from some bits, but hopefully this will last.
On the same thread someone said they put a gas strut in. I really like the old one though!
Posted by: glang, April 25, 2017, 5:46pm; Reply: 582
Result, good to know as mines probably not much better but I certainly wont be putting any gas strut in....
Posted by: Paula, May 11, 2017, 5:26pm; Reply: 583
Quoted from Paula
Here's a video of my car.
It's picked up the whistle very well. It's actually not very noticeable from inside

https://youtu.be/qX1ySzdWJXI


Remember that alternator whistling noise? Well i have fitted a new alternator and it's all lovely and quiet.
Rimmer Brothers are going to refund me.
Which is nice.
Posted by: Paula, May 11, 2017, 6:18pm; Reply: 584
Does anyone know where i can get a new pipe to the fuel pump? I can't find internal dims of the tube on Rimmer Bros
Posted by: Nick Jones, May 11, 2017, 6:30pm; Reply: 585
It will be either 1/4" (6mm) or 5/16" (8mm) which is the nominal internal diameter of the flexipipe or external diameter of the pipe.

Vitesse 2L are the larger side and Herald the smaller - not sure about Vitesse 1600.

SAE J30 R9 is the correct spec for modern ethanol containing fuels.  Can be bought from (amongst others)
http://www.advancedfluidsolutions.co.uk/56mm-id-732-saej30r9-nitrile-rubber-fuel-injection-hose-sae-r9-627-p.asp who also sell on ebay.

Should be possible to get from local motor factors too though round here they mostly lesser spec stuff that allows the fumes to permeate the rubber making the car stink of fuel.

Nick
Posted by: Paula, May 11, 2017, 6:57pm; Reply: 586
Quoted from Nick Jones
It will be either 1/4" (6mm) or 5/16" (8mm) which is the nominal internal diameter of the flexipipe or external diameter of the pipe.

Vitesse 2L are the larger side and Herald the smaller - not sure about Vitesse 1600.

SAE J30 R9 is the correct spec for modern ethanol containing fuels.  Can be bought from (amongst others)
http://www.advancedfluidsolutions.co.uk/56mm-id-732-saej30r9-nitrile-rubber-fuel-injection-hose-sae-r9-627-p.asp who also sell on ebay.

Should be possible to get from local motor factors too though round here they mostly lesser spec stuff that allows the fumes to permeate the rubber making the car stink of fuel.

Nick


Ok, great. To measure do you measure the pipe it fits on or the tube that goes over it?
Posted by: Paula, May 11, 2017, 6:58pm; Reply: 587
Quoted from Nick Jones
It will be either 1/4" (6mm) or 5/16" (8mm) which is the nominal internal diameter of the flexipipe or external diameter of the pipe.

Vitesse 2L are the larger side and Herald the smaller - not sure about Vitesse 1600.

SAE J30 R9 is the correct spec for modern ethanol containing fuels.  Can be bought from (amongst others)
http://www.advancedfluidsolutions.co.uk/56mm-id-732-saej30r9-nitrile-rubber-fuel-injection-hose-sae-r9-627-p.asp who also sell on ebay.

Should be possible to get from local motor factors too though round here they mostly lesser spec stuff that allows the fumes to permeate the rubber making the car stink of fuel.

Nick


Ok, great. To measure do you measure the pipe it fits on or the tube that goes over it?
Posted by: Richard B, May 11, 2017, 7:40pm; Reply: 588
Its the external diameter of the metal pipe.

The hose is measured by the internal diameter of the bore. Best put a couple of good hose clips on it to keep it secure.

Something like these, rather than jubilee clips. As Jubilee do not work so well on small diameters.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MINI-FUEL-LINE-STAINLESS-STEEL-ZINC-JUBILEE-HOSE-CLIP-CLAMP-DIESEL-PETROL-PIPE-/201803990091?var=&hash=item2efc74844b:m:mwWdlNodq8juRwW_xrnMvzw
Posted by: Paula, May 11, 2017, 7:45pm; Reply: 589
Quoted from Richard B
Its the external diameter of the metal pipe.

The hose is measured by the internal diameter of the bore. Best put a couple of good hose clips on it to keep it secure.

Something like these, rather than jubilee clips. As Jubilee do not work so well on small diameters.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MINI-FUEL-LINE-STAINLESS-STEEL-ZINC-JUBILEE-HOSE-CLIP-CLAMP-DIESEL-PETROL-PIPE-/201803990091?var=&hash=item2efc74844b:m:mwWdlNodq8juRwW_xrnMvzw


Brilliant.
Thank you!
Posted by: Spider, May 11, 2017, 8:10pm; Reply: 590
Would be a good idea to include an in line fuel filter in the hose to catch any crud sucked up from the bottom of the tank.
Posted by: Dannyb, May 11, 2017, 8:56pm; Reply: 591
I believe it's 6mm. But make sure you get R9 type pipe which will stand up to modern fuel.
Posted by: Dannyb, May 11, 2017, 8:59pm; Reply: 592
I got mine from hear
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/R9-Fuel-INJECTION-Rubber-Petrol-Hose-Pipe-SAEJ30R9-High-Pressure-Line-Reinforced-/140850656095?var=&hash=item20cb5a735f:m:maXm2MNb-YAZkK6h9PSHfUQ
Posted by: Paula, May 12, 2017, 7:31am; Reply: 593
Quoted from Dannyb


Done!
Posted by: Paula, May 12, 2017, 7:33am; Reply: 594
Quoted from Spider
Would be a good idea to include an in line fuel filter in the hose to catch any crud sucked up from the bottom of the tank.


There is one after the pump
Posted by: yorkshire_spam, May 12, 2017, 8:20pm; Reply: 595
Beware of cheap "R9" hose - I got some and it lasted about 12 months before it fell apart. In the end I ordered some decent actual 1/4" gates' brand hose from the USA
Posted by: Dannyb, May 14, 2017, 1:49am; Reply: 596
The one Paula ordered as been on my car 3 years no problem
Posted by: yorkshire_spam, May 14, 2017, 4:03pm; Reply: 597
Quoted from Dannyb
The one Paula ordered as been on my car 3 years no problem


That's a relief Danny! I've had real trouble with it over the years.
Posted by: ferny, May 14, 2017, 5:26pm; Reply: 598
Quoted from yorkshire_spam


That's a relief Danny! I've had real trouble with it over the years.


Same. Tried lots of R9 including Greenshield from America. Others haven't had problems but mine tends to crack after 12 months. I suspect it isn't a fan of "outdoorsy" areas and prefers to be kept out of the elements.

Some blue 30b pressure pipe I use which isn't designed for petrol has been fine for more years that I can remember in the same areas.
Posted by: Stuart Wilson, May 15, 2017, 11:38am; Reply: 599
Quoted from Paula


There is one after the pump



On my TR and I think on the Moss I've actually got an inline filter both before and after the fuel pump
Posted by: Paula, May 16, 2017, 8:32pm; Reply: 600
Quoted from Dannyb
The one Paula ordered as been on my car 3 years no problem


Good to know!
Posted by: Paula, May 16, 2017, 8:33pm; Reply: 601
Quoted from Stuart Wilson



On my TR and I think on the Moss I've actually got an inline filter both before and after the fuel pump


Ok. I can see the advantage
Posted by: Paula, May 16, 2017, 8:41pm; Reply: 602
I've got a bit of a weird oil leak now.
I'm not sure if it's from the fuel pump or above it on the head.
What it's doing is sicking up oil on start up. Maybe a 1/3 of a cup.
I have put a new rocker cover gasket on and changed the fuel pump gasket, but i'm not confident i did a good job of the fuel pump gasket, but it's done up nice and tight.
Has anyone had a leak like this?
The road outside my house is looking pretty bad and i'm sure everyone knows it's me!
Posted by: thescrapman, May 16, 2017, 9:31pm; Reply: 603
Sounds like oil filter, seals not seated right
Posted by: Pete Lewis, May 17, 2017, 9:29am; Reply: 604
agree with colin ,  + there is  only the pump, the breather, rocker cover and filter on that side thats likely to leak most you have checked , the original oil filter bowl seals can be a problem

you cant see down the seal register with the side plates on but the groove the 0 ring sits is stepped, its easy to fit a seal thinking its best to fit new and troubles begin , if the seal is not carefully pushed down the stepped groove it does not  sit flat and when you refit the bowl it ring gets chopped

and leaks prevail

bac to a dust of talc to see where the trace starts .

Pete
Posted by: Paula, May 18, 2017, 8:24am; Reply: 605
Ok, I see.
I'll give it a good clean up and maybe start it from the solenoid and see where it's spewing from.
I got the garage to fit a new oil filter a couple of months ago. So i'm thinking that's probably ok.
Like the talk idea!
Posted by: Paula, May 18, 2017, 11:41am; Reply: 606
I did the talc test and it does look like the oil filter seal.
I tightened it up and got a good 1/4 turn out of the bolt so maybe that will do it.
I'll order a new seal and filter anyway.
Thanks!!!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, May 19, 2017, 11:37am; Reply: 607
if it doesnt find the leak it makes it smell better !!!

if you fit the new seal remember what i said about getting it right down inside the lower groove in the block recess,  

you cant just thumb it  and hope there's many an oil tight car thats sprung a wild leak after a one of these filters have been changed

put a spin on kit on your  Xmas list, makes it easy, but on the  1600/mk1 you need to modify that breather pipe .with hose or plumbing we used plumbing as we had some spare elbows

Pete
Posted by: TedTaylor, May 19, 2017, 12:20pm; Reply: 608
Quoted from Paula
Ok, I see.
I'll give it a good clean up and maybe start it from the solenoid and see where it's spewing from.
I got the garage to fit a new oil filter a couple of months ago. So i'm thinking that's probably ok.
Like the talk idea!


Paula you should not been gtting any leaks after only 2 months - perhaps after a year or two but should last until your next oil change.  

Sounds like the garage did not tiqhten it up properly - have words with them because you should not have to carry the cost of a new filter/seal if one is needed.

MUT
Posted by: Nick Jones, May 19, 2017, 2:05pm; Reply: 609
Favourite with these is having the mangled remains an old seal (or sometimes more than one) lurking in the bottom of the seal groove.  Can be hard to detect and harder to remove but still prevent effective sealing.

Nick
Posted by: daver clasper, May 19, 2017, 5:13pm; Reply: 610
Quoted from Paula


There is one after the pump


I think most commonly fitted before the pump, which makes sense to keep the pump clean

Posted by: Paula, May 20, 2017, 1:07pm; Reply: 611
Quoted from Pete Lewis
if it doesnt find the leak it makes it smell better !!!

if you fit the new seal remember what i said about getting it right down inside the lower groove in the block recess,  

you cant just thumb it  and hope there's many an oil tight car thats sprung a wild leak after a one of these filters have been changed

put a spin on kit on your  Xmas list, makes it easy, but on the  1600/mk1 you need to modify that breather pipe .with hose or plumbing we used plumbing as we had some spare elbows

Pete


I thought about that, but i didn't think it was an option because of the breather pipe. Good to know
Posted by: Paula, May 20, 2017, 1:09pm; Reply: 612
Quoted from TedTaylor


Paula you should not been gtting any leaks after only 2 months - perhaps after a year or two but should last until your next oil change.  

Sounds like the garage did not tiqhten it up properly - have words with them because you should not have to carry the cost of a new filter/seal if one is needed.

MUT


I'll let them know!
Posted by: Paula, May 20, 2017, 1:15pm; Reply: 613
Spent nearly 3 hours last night until nearly 5am in a garage as the battery went flat.
I'm pretty sure it was the alternator plug, I took it apart and plugged the connectors straight on. All i needed then was a jump start but the garage guy said he wasn't allowed out of his box and the mini cab driver who stopped for petrol said he didn't have leads. I said i did, to which he replied, sorry i'm on my way to the airport and drove off!
People eh?
RAC man arrived and jumped it and it's all great again.
Posted by: JohnD, May 20, 2017, 8:34pm; Reply: 614
Paula,
I recommend a smart battery charger, that can de-sulphate your plates.   EG: http://www.halfords.com/workshop-tools/garage-equipment/battery-chargers-jump-starters/halfords-smart-battery-charger-vehicles-up-to-2-0l

I'm always starting my car for short tests etc, or using other electrical kit on it, and running the battery down, without even short trips to recharge it.
Ever since I git one of these, the battery has just felt much better!

John
Posted by: Paula, May 21, 2017, 10:30pm; Reply: 615
Quoted from JohnD
Paula,
I recommend a smart battery charger, that can de-sulphate your plates.   EG: http://www.halfords.com/workshop-tools/garage-equipment/battery-chargers-jump-starters/halfords-smart-battery-charger-vehicles-up-to-2-0l

I'm always starting my car for short tests etc, or using other electrical kit on it, and running the battery down, without even short trips to recharge it.
Ever since I git one of these, the battery has just felt much better!

John


I'll look into it.
It's all good now so it looks like it was just a rubbish connection.

Posted by: Paula, May 21, 2017, 11:17pm; Reply: 616
I had to pull over on the M23 tonight because i was getting a high pitch noise from the front right. There is a tiny amount of play in the wheel so i'm thinking wheel bearing?
Could it just need nipping up or am i better off pulling the hub off?
Will i need a puller?
Are there grease nipples? I can't see any on the drawings.

Never ending this!
Posted by: thescrapman, May 22, 2017, 6:08am; Reply: 617
Paula

Don't just "nip it up" as triumph bearings need play in them. The club has an expert on over tightening bearings, but I won't shame him again.

No puller neeed, you will need to drift out the inner races if you change the bearing though. There are 2 handy grooves in
the hub to assist

Only takes 30 mins to change one once you have done a few.

Cheers
Posted by: Pete Lewis, May 22, 2017, 6:46am; Reply: 618
Yes light hand effort to just nip the castle nut and back of one flat maybe two. Fit a new split pin

spec play is 0.002 to 0.008"  at max it gives pad press back and a lot of rock at the wheel rim

keep to the lower end , if its tight it will rapidliy seize the bearing to its stub axle

old day's the hub cavity would be filled with grease , total waste of time and grease, it holds the heat and wont lube the bearings,  just deeply coat the races with grease ,

you will need a screwdriver and small  hammer to tap the tin cap off.,

split pins are 3 mm dia.   There are two holes in the stub to allow finer adjustement of the castle nut
The nut will seem loose , the pin retains it and the D washer stops any rotatoin forces
the bearings are a loose hand  fit on the stub shaft and should rotate on it,  you will see the rotaion marks on the back of the washer
to remove the hub if needed you must remove the caliper and hang it up to avoid hose stretch
pete

the loose fitting nut wont undo the pin hols
ds it and the washer with a D hole stops any rotation
Posted by: glang, May 22, 2017, 6:56am; Reply: 619
Hi Paula, dont rush into changing the bearing. Give the wheel a spin with it jacked - is it rough or noisy? Sometimes its difficult to locate sounds or maybe you have the correct location but its a stone trapped in the disc guard. I know youre rapidly become an old hand at all this  ;D but sometimes its really easy to become fixated on an idea.....
Posted by: daver clasper, May 22, 2017, 7:38am; Reply: 620
Hi

If it is bearing, those metal grease caps can be tricky first time. A shorter, sturdy screwdriver etc helps. They can get a few dents in cap over time from doing this and this helps with the purchase.
Posted by: JohnD, May 22, 2017, 8:35am; Reply: 621
The "tin cap" is a 'grease cap', and "using a hammer and small screwdriver to tap it off" will soon deform it, risking it falling off.
The OFFICIAL method is to "screw a No.10 UNF bolt into the centre of the cap", where there is a hole for this purpose. (Quoting ST Workshop manual.    I think that a No.10 UNF has a diameter of 19/100"ths, approx 1/20", or even more approximately 5mm)
If you don't happen to have a No.10 in your reticule, a self-tapping screw will do the job.
Long enough to bear on the end of the stub axle so that screwing it down pushes the cap off.

Be gentle, dear lady, else the hole will get bigger.
It will, anyway, so use bigger ST screws, but consider getting a small nut welded/brazed inside, or even outside the hole, and keeping the matching bolt in a safe place for future use.
This will prevent hole enlargement.
  A 1/4" UNF is ideal, or a 6mm metric, and a bit more available than a No.10!

John
Posted by: Paula, May 22, 2017, 8:57am; Reply: 622
Right . Wow.
I'll get on this later in the week. Expect a blow by blow account with pictures and videos. You lucky lucky people!
Posted by: Paula, May 22, 2017, 7:31pm; Reply: 623
Quoted from Pete Lewis


spec play is 0.002 to 0.008"  at max it gives pad press back and a lot of rock at the wheel rim



Where do you take the measurement?
Posted by: glang, May 22, 2017, 9:06pm; Reply: 624
Its not something you can measure Paula and anyway getting the split pin in means its not an exact process. As long as you can detect a slight movement in the wheel afterwards its fine, well, until you have to convince the tester at the next MOT that its meant to be like that (Ive even had to show them the manual before now!).
Posted by: JohnD, May 23, 2017, 8:28am; Reply: 625
For those who like to be a bit more exact, two holes through the end of the stub axle, at right angles to each other.
Because the castellated nut on the stub that takes the pin is hexagonal, if one hole means winding it back a bit far, the other can always take the pin tighter.
One hole - max wind back 30 degrees.  Two holes max wind back 15 degrees
John
Posted by: Pete Lewis, May 23, 2017, 9:33am; Reply: 626
and bearings normally growl , like old metal wheel roller skates,  screeching is lets say unusual,   bearing noises generally change when braking or cornering can change the tones you get.

if bearing was seizing then maybe some expensive screeches ,  hopefully not the case

look for something trapped in  the brake pads etc.  . a spin of the wheel should be quiet no rumbling and free to rotate/spin  with the pads out
or pressed back )

any growl or whirry noises and youre in for some strong tea a cup cake sit on floor and take it all apart

Pete
Posted by: Paula, May 23, 2017, 9:45am; Reply: 627
At first i thought it was some plastic caught in the front. Maybe it was?!
I've a day off tomorrow, so investigations will happen then
Posted by: Stuart Wilson, May 23, 2017, 10:25am; Reply: 628
It may be an idea to take pics as you do any jobs and note down what you have done and send it to Dale, Club Torque editor and have it featured in the brilliant club magazine. He is always on the look out for articles no matter how big or small.
Posted by: Paula, May 24, 2017, 5:44pm; Reply: 629
I jacked up the right wheel and tried to give it a spin and it was pretty stiff. I removed the caliper and it span lovely.
Looking at the caliper it looks like one of the pistons is seized.
The pad on that piston has worn much faster than the other one.
I pulled off the left wheel and it spins fine, but there is a shriiiiiing noise a bit like if a ting sword being drawn. I think some copper grease should sort that out.
So I think i should address these 2 things and see if that has got it?

New caliper? do i buy in pairs? are they fixable? should i change the hoses?
Posted by: Paula, May 24, 2017, 5:45pm; Reply: 630
Here's the left side
Posted by: Richard B, May 24, 2017, 5:57pm; Reply: 631
You can try freeing the piston up with;

pad removed, master cylinder cap off to let the air out and possibly a rag around the cylinder if it is full. Then a crowbar between the disc and piston

Lever it back and then pump it out a few times using the pedal to exercise it. Don't pump too much as is will pop out of the caliper.

Obviously check for leaks when done, and best do both pistons. They should go flush back with the caliper when a new pad is fitted anyway.

If not new/recon calipers, and personally I always fit a pair where possible.


Often happens with a car standing around.
Posted by: Paula, May 24, 2017, 6:35pm; Reply: 632
Ok, I'll give that a go!
Posted by: ferny, May 25, 2017, 6:32am; Reply: 633
Do as Richard says. Sadly though, if it's stuck once then it probably will again. If concerned then rebuild them, it's not too expensive. You'll need a good compressor though and check you can get the pistons out before you buy the parts. Never had an issue with cars but tried to rebuild four bike callipers recently and one piston on every calliper refused to move. You can send them away and exchange for new if needed.

A pair of welding pliers like below are idea for moving pistons back of holding them in place.

I've got some four-pot callipers to fit to the Herald which looks like they've been at the bottom of the sea. They're going to be a nightmare to get to pistons out of!
Posted by: Paula, May 25, 2017, 7:51am; Reply: 634
This is a video of the wheel spinning. Sounded good to me?
This is just before i go my finger caught in the studs. Ouch!

https://youtu.be/EhBh8MZ674I
Posted by: JohnD, May 25, 2017, 8:57am; Reply: 635
Paula,
Re your video and the grease cap on the wheel bearings.
THAT is what a hammer and a screwdriver does to them!

John
Posted by: Paula, May 25, 2017, 8:58am; Reply: 636
I got carried away as i was buying new pads and bought a recon caliper as well!
I thought as it's my only car i need to keep it on the road so i can justify the expense there.
Oh i bought a new hose too, because the one on the car was hard and that didn't seem right to me.

I'm also thinking if the pistons are corroded i might start a leak by pushing it back in, then i'm off the road.

Should have all the bits tomorrow.


Posted by: JohnD, May 25, 2017, 11:20am; Reply: 637
Brake hoses are hard, think of the pressure inside.
A better test is to bend it, try to kink it.  Any crack will become visible then.
No argument with a new one though!

John
Posted by: Pete Lewis, May 25, 2017, 12:39pm; Reply: 638
any front brake changes are best done in pairs,  as a thought you probably have whats known a type 12s caliphers,  they are a bit weeny

type 14 are straight swap, far more availability  or if you change the support plate then you can up to  Vit2 ltr/GT6 known as  type 16s and a slightly bigger disc,  then she stops

we had some interesting fun with the type  12  small pads  at speed pretty hopeless,  especially green things , when we really want to go round the roundabout not over it  

you  have  anti squeal shims fitted , they have an arrow to face direction of rotation, and smear all back faces with a anti seize like coppa slip grease, if the sprung  edge has flattened just a tweek with pliers will add a little end load

pete
Posted by: Paula, May 25, 2017, 1:18pm; Reply: 639
Oh. I 've bought a type 12 caliper. and the weeny pads too.
It's probably a quicker way on a roundabout anyway!
Posted by: Richard B, May 25, 2017, 6:11pm; Reply: 640
Wheel studs, Ouch!

New caps were quite cheap. (haven't check recently). A light tap around the side with a screwdriver & hammer normally frees them, hitting towards the outside of the car.

Those do look mullered.  I'm sure by a DPO, not you Paula.  ;D
Posted by: Paula, May 25, 2017, 6:19pm; Reply: 641
Quoted from Richard B
Wheel studs, Ouch!

New caps were quite cheap. (haven't check recently). A light tap around the side with a screwdriver & hammer normally frees them, hitting towards the outside of the car.

Those do look mullered.  I'm sure by a DPO, not you Paula.  ;D


They have been happily living encased in chrome trim until now. Poor things
Posted by: Pete Lewis, May 26, 2017, 6:16am; Reply: 642
Good stick with the 12s,  if you feel fergal needs more brake you can dream about a upgrade with later triumph
fitted  parts without busting the bank on specials.
Ive never got on witth green stuff pads , easy to clean wheels but hopeless as a brake.
dont know if you can get mintex 1144 pads for type 12s they improve the bight and braking.

pete
Posted by: Paula, May 26, 2017, 5:41pm; Reply: 643
All done.
I changed the pads on both sides, but just the caliper and hose on one side.
There was anti squeal plates only fitted to one side, maybe that was the noise?
I haven't been over 40mph, but it runs and stops very well.
I used a 'One Person" bleed bottle from Halfords. worked great.
Pretty chuffed, kind of wish i'd got both sides now.
Posted by: Paula, May 26, 2017, 5:49pm; Reply: 644
I got these pads.
The front tyres lock up under maximum braking so that's er good
https://www.rimmerbros.co.uk/Item--i-GBP166K
Posted by: Pete Lewis, May 26, 2017, 5:55pm; Reply: 645
do you have shims both sides now??  these stop pad squeal , it sort of tilts the pad a fraction to give it a lead in .  

glad it stops ok ,   mine was a bit of a flyer and needed  some better anchors

Pete
Posted by: Paula, May 26, 2017, 6:11pm; Reply: 646
Quoted from Pete Lewis
do you have shims both sides now??  these stop pad squeal , it sort of tilts the pad a fraction to give it a lead in .  

glad it stops ok ,   mine was a bit of a flyer and needed  some better anchors

Pete


Shims both sides now, they came in the kit. I did fit them backwards first time though!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, May 27, 2017, 2:24pm; Reply: 647
thats ok   good you own up    Ha !

the full shims have the arrow   /\   the part shims dont have it , so its easy to upside down them

rule of thumb the relieved area faces the direction of rotation so the piston pushes the trailing edge with the shim gap leading

some calipers the cut out is machined in the piston , , great until the piston rotates a bit and its upside down as well

some uase a sticky plasticised pad , ive never found them to work very well,  there a lot of designs out there over the years

Pete
Posted by: Paula, May 28, 2017, 11:15pm; Reply: 648
Quoted from Pete Lewis
thats ok   good you own up    Ha !

the full shims have the arrow   /\   the part shims dont have it , so its easy to upside down them

rule of thumb the relieved area faces the direction of rotation so the piston pushes the trailing edge with the shim gap leading

some calipers the cut out is machined in the piston , , great until the piston rotates a bit and its upside down as well

some uase a sticky plasticised pad , ive never found them to work very well,  there a lot of designs out there over the years

Pete


I actually managed to put them the right way up but switched around so the spring bit was pushing on the side of the piston.
Smart eh?
Posted by: Pete Lewis, May 29, 2017, 12:56pm; Reply: 649
Paula..........too much Owning up  !!!  

Pete


Posted by: Pete Lewis, May 29, 2017, 12:56pm; Reply: 650
Paula..........too much Owning up  !!!  

Pete


Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 9:25am; Reply: 651
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Paula..........too much Owning up  !!!  

Pete




Ha! Honest as the day is long me!
Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 9:38am; Reply: 652
Ok Speedo cable now. My speedo cable was routed so it was rubbing on the throttle linkage spring to the left of the carbs.  It was also feed through the pipes on the clutch master cylinder.
The needle was also wagging about 20mph!
I re-routed it out of the way and the wagging went away but it made a funny noise for about 3 miles and then stopped working all together. I suspect a broken cable (well i hope so anyway).
Is it a job i can do on the side of the road? I've looked at a drawing and the drive seems to be near the rear of the gearbox somewhere.
What's the best route to take it? Pictures would really help!
Cheers!
Posted by: Richard B, June 7, 2017, 11:33am; Reply: 653
Quoted from Paula

I re-routed it out of the way and the wagging went away but it made a funny noise for about 3 miles and then stopped working all together. I suspect a broken cable (well i hope so anyway).
Is it a job i can do on the side of the road? I've looked at a drawing and the drive seems to be near the rear of the gearbox somewhere.


The sound was probably the inner cable rubbing on the sheath, might have been too tight a turn somewhere in your new route.

I think you will have to take the gearbox tunnel off to get to the gearbox end of the cable. So no heavy lifting just an awkward item to remove and refit. It's held in by a number of screws into the floor and bulkhead. Hours of fun entailed in getting all the holes to line up and seal it heat / air-tight.

OE gearbox tunnels are hardboard, cheap repro ones are fibreglass. I think the better plastic ones are available for the Vitesse. You wont know which is fitted until you lift the carpet.
Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 12:23pm; Reply: 654
Quoted from Richard B


The sound was probably the inner cable rubbing on the sheath, might have been too tight a turn somewhere in your new route.

I think you will have to take the gearbox tunnel off to get to the gearbox end of the cable. So no heavy lifting just an awkward item to remove and refit. It's held in by a number of screws into the floor and bulkhead. Hours of fun entailed in getting all the holes to line up and seal it heat / air-tight.

OE gearbox tunnels are hardboard, cheap repro ones are fibreglass. I think the better plastic ones are available for the Vitesse. You wont know which is fitted until you lift the carpet.


Oh dear.
Posted by: glang, June 7, 2017, 12:33pm; Reply: 655
Non overdrive at least speedo cable can be changed from underneath but its a bit of a pig. You will need small long hands and maybe a long handled wrench to get it started although watch out as the screwed connector is aluminium and easily damaged.....
Posted by: glang, June 7, 2017, 12:38pm; Reply: 656
oh and just seen your photo - my cable goes more to the left, dropping down in a smooth curve by the starter solenoid but its still cable tied to a hydraulic pipe to stop it wagging around...
Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 12:44pm; Reply: 657
Quoted from glang
oh and just seen your photo - my cable goes more to the left, dropping down in a smooth curve by the starter solenoid but its still cable tied to a hydraulic pipe to stop it wagging around...


Wish i hadn't moved it now
Posted by: glang, June 7, 2017, 1:08pm; Reply: 658
It was probably ready for a change and isnt expensive and remember its all part of the fun (I find it helps to keep on repeating this)!
Posted by: JohnD, June 7, 2017, 1:31pm; Reply: 659
The speedo cable goes near the exhaust pipe, and I've burnt off the outer plastic casing of more than one.
Can be restored with some heatshrink, insulating tape or that 'self-combining' tape.

But no more!   I ran the speedo cable through some stainless braided sleeve - like this: http://www.abthermaltech.co.uk/304ss-stainless-steel-braided-sleeve-hose-wire-abrasion-protection.html  Other suppliers, etc etc
Chose a width much wider than the cable, for a heat insulating air gap around it.
You can use so long a piece of braid that it just sits on the gearbox - push it up to take the cable off.

John

PS the absolute route is not critical, as long as it follows a wide radius curve all the wa.
Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 1:57pm; Reply: 660
Quoted from glang
It was probably ready for a change and isnt expensive and remember its all part of the fun (I find it helps to keep on repeating this)!


It's all part of the fun, It's all part of the fun, It's all part of the fun!!
Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 3:00pm; Reply: 661
MInes a overdrive model.
Could i cut a hole and make a little door in the gearbox tunnel if it's only fibreglass or hardboard?
I could call it an inspection hatch.
Posted by: glang, June 7, 2017, 3:19pm; Reply: 662
I believe thats a possibility but have a look from underneath first. In theory the overdrive model should be easier cos the cable connects to a right-angle geardrive (of course the problem could be with this...) before it goes into the gearbox itself. You might need to move the exhaust pipe over slightly and I do this by undoing the backbox bracket (Ive only got this one but you could have more) then dropping it down and over a bit onto an axle stand.
Posted by: RobPearce, June 7, 2017, 3:47pm; Reply: 663
If you do manage to undo the cable from below, remember to tie some string to it so that you can pull the new cable into place...

Removing the gearbox cover on a Vitesse isn't that bad a job. Try doing it on a GT6!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, June 7, 2017, 4:30pm; Reply: 664
Angle drives can fail , recent tech note shows a space washer   538532   is essential between  the drive and the od  pinion mounting , or the pre load stuffs the angle drive ...as many have found

There used to be a short bracket welded to the baulkhead to tie the cable to.

my colleague has used a  std cable cut hole in tunnel and run cable inside under the carpet
this idea doesnt need angle drives .   Just an idea

Needle twitch is due to the inner winding up and letting go you should lubricate inner cables with graphite dust but unless you sharpen pencils , its not very useful  , any light greasing will work
but it may transpose up the cable and get in the speedo , not good

There is a special grease ( I have some) it smells awful
if you ever need it I can post some

im sure there's  some vaseline knocking about   light smears not handfulls

pete
Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 5:08pm; Reply: 665
Quoted from glang
I believe thats a possibility but have a look from underneath first. In theory the overdrive model should be easier cos the cable connects to a right-angle geardrive (of course the problem could be with this...) before it goes into the gearbox itself. You might need to move the exhaust pipe over slightly and I do this by undoing the backbox bracket (Ive only got this one but you could have more) then dropping it down and over a bit onto an axle stand.


Ok, I am going to get some axle stands and a trolley jack before i try this then!
Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 5:09pm; Reply: 666
Quoted from RobPearce
If you do manage to undo the cable from below, remember to tie some string to it so that you can pull the new cable into place...

Removing the gearbox cover on a Vitesse isn't that bad a job. Try doing it on a GT6!


Ok got it!
Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 5:13pm; Reply: 667
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Angle drives can fail , recent tech note shows a space washer   538532   is essential between  the drive and the od  pinion mounting , or the pre load stuffs the angle drive ...as many have found

There used to be a short bracket welded to the baulkhead to tie the cable to.

my colleague has used a  std cable cut hole in tunnel and run cable inside under the carpet
this idea doesnt need angle drives .   Just an idea

Needle twitch is due to the inner winding up and letting go you should lubricate inner cables with graphite dust but unless you sharpen pencils , its not very useful  , any light greasing will work
but it may transpose up the cable and get in the speedo , not good

There is a special grease ( I have some) it smells awful
if you ever need it I can post some

im sure there's  some vaseline knocking about   light smears not handfulls

pete


Ok. I actually have some graphite dust at work. Can you pull the inner cable all the way out of the outer to lubricate it?
Posted by: glang, June 7, 2017, 5:49pm; Reply: 668
Quoted from Paula


Ok, I am going to get some axle stands and a trolley jack before i try this then!


Or ramps are probably easier and safer. If you are going to jack it up, after chocking the back wheels, I usually do it on the front cross member and then very carefully put an axle stand under each side by the front suspension mounting points. It doesnt get the car up very high but I feel it stresses the chassis less than supporting it futher back and should be enough to get under the gearbox.
Alternatively if theres any other jobs to do on the gearbox (oil level, bolt tightening, wiring check, noise insulation check, gear lever bushes change etc) its not a major job to get the cover off. Just seats out (hopefully the four bolts on each are free), gearbox hump carpet off, 20 odd cover screws and wrestle the b*@#t% out :o
Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 6:04pm; Reply: 669
Quoted from glang


Or ramps are probably easier and safer. If you are going to jack it up, after chocking the back wheels, I usually do it on the front cross member and then very carefully put an axle stand under each side by the front suspension mounting points. It doesnt get the car up very high but I feel it stresses the chassis less than supporting it futher back and should be enough to get under the gearbox.
Alternatively if theres any other jobs to do on the gearbox (oil level, bolt tightening, wiring check, noise insulation check, gear lever bushes change etc) its not a major job to get the cover off. Just seats out (hopefully the four bolts on each are free), gearbox hump carpet off, 20 odd cover screws and wrestle the b*@#t% out :o


Now you've said all that i feel i need to get the cover off. Maybe even change the Gearbox oil
Posted by: glang, June 7, 2017, 6:22pm; Reply: 670
Funny you should say that cos I got a nasty surprise concerning the oil level recently. My gearbox doesnt seem to leak much but when I topped it up for the first time in quite a few years but not miles it was really low and I have probably brought forward a rebuild by quite a bit :B
Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 6:44pm; Reply: 671
Quoted from glang
Funny you should say that cos I got a nasty surprise concerning the oil level recently. My gearbox doesnt seem to leak much but when I topped it up for the first time in quite a few years but not miles it was really low and I have probably brought forward a rebuild by quite a bit :B


That's sealed it then! (pun intended)
Posted by: daver clasper, June 7, 2017, 8:44pm; Reply: 672
Not had to take seats out to take G/B cover off before (just slit back to max). Also if you do take seats out, I have just removed the 2 each seat pivot bolts.

For each seat,there are 2 horizontal position pivot holes that can be used so the seat, when tilted upright, is angled so it doesn't interfere with top of A post.  
Posted by: glang, June 7, 2017, 9:23pm; Reply: 673
As Dave says Paula give it a go without removing the seats or maybe just one - dont want extra work do you! However if you do need to take out one or more Im not a fan of using the pivot bolts as I found it a right pig to get them back together with all their thin spacer washers....
Posted by: Paula, June 7, 2017, 9:31pm; Reply: 674
Ok, I'll definitely try without removing them first.
Knowing my car the seats are probably only held in with a a couple of bolts anyway!
Posted by: Richard B, June 7, 2017, 10:58pm; Reply: 675
Quoted from glang
its not a major job to get the cover off. Just seats out (hopefully the four bolts on each are free), gearbox hump carpet off, 20 odd cover screws and wrestle the b*@#t% out :o


and no jacking up or axle stands involved!  8)
Posted by: Pete Lewis, June 8, 2017, 9:14am; Reply: 676
removing the heater air distribution flap contraption helps with removal of the tunnel ,
  its only 2 nuts and a cable clamp   ....well upside down in varifocals makes it interesting to remove.

it will come out without removing the seats,  but with any inside work seat out and steering wheel off gives a lot more  room to curse and moan , getting the top lip of the tunnel from under the dash is the awkward bit.

remove gear knob and put  gear stick into 3rd and lift the tail as high as possible ,

Pete
Posted by: Paula, June 8, 2017, 9:16am; Reply: 677
Quoted from Pete Lewis
removing the heater air distribution flap contraption helps with removal of the tunnel ,
  its only 2 nuts and a cable clamp   ....well upside down in varifocals makes it interesting to remove.

it will come out without removing the seats,  but with any inside work seat out and steering wheel off gives a lot more  room to curse and moan , getting the top lip of the tunnel from under the dash is the awkward bit.

remove gear knob and put  gear stick into 3rd and lift the tail as high as possible ,

Pete


This sounds like so much fun i'm tempted to film it!
Posted by: JohnD, June 8, 2017, 9:22am; Reply: 678
If your cover is in good condition  (or if it isn't, is falling apart and you decide to get a plastic/GRP one) consider cutting an access hole to make future gearbox oil changes easy.

To know where to cut the hole, take measurements, up from the edge of the floor and back from the bulkhead, drill a small hole, big enough to squint through and confirm that it's centred on the filler, and then cut it bigger.
Fill the hole with a piece of metal sheet, a bit larger than the hole, and fix it in place with "Spire" clips on the edge of the hole in the cover, and self-tapping screws.
Put some self-adhesive, 'draught-excluder' foam around the edge of the hole, to keep the wind out.

See below,
John

PS the metal sheet in front of the access panel was needed to make room for a Hi-Torque starter motor.
Posted by: Paula, June 8, 2017, 9:48am; Reply: 679
Quoted from JohnD
If your cover is in good condition  (or if it isn't, is falling apart and you decide to get a plastic/GRP one) consider cutting an access hole to make future gearbox oil changes easy.

To know where to cut the hole, take measurements, up from the edge of the floor and back from the bulkhead, drill a small hole, big enough to squint through and confirm that it's centred on the filler, and then cut it bigger.
Fill the hole with a piece of metal sheet, a bit larger than the hole, and fix it in place with "Spire" clips on the edge of the hole in the cover, and self-tapping screws.
Put some self-adhesive, 'draught-excluder' foam around the edge of the hole, to keep the wind out.

See below,
John

PS the metal sheet in front of the access panel was needed to make room for a Hi-Torque starter motor.


Great idea.The photo really will help. Is the filler also the level plug?

I'm thinking i'll do this after Standard Triumph Marque Day. Just in case i screw it up and can't drive there.
Posted by: RobPearce, June 8, 2017, 10:42am; Reply: 680
Quoted from Paula
Is the filler also the level plug?

Yes, you fill it up until it begins to dribble out. It seems to me that it's easier to judge that with the whole gearbox exposed than it is through a failry small hole, but then I've never had a car with said hole provided.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, June 8, 2017, 5:46pm; Reply: 681
There are some covers out there with larger holes , and more of them ,  some need to get hands through to get the plug back in,  
one for filler
overdrive adjustment cover
speedo drive
doesnt leave much cover un attacked


The level filler does GB and OD they use  common oil  / level

You need a bottle of oil with squeezy and extention tube  or a  big syringe  oiler
to squirt oil in the gearbox

pete


Posted by: nang, June 9, 2017, 5:57am; Reply: 682
Or a garden sprayer. (eek)
Tony.
Posted by: Paula, June 9, 2017, 8:28am; Reply: 683
i have a wesco can. Might take a while
Posted by: Paula, June 9, 2017, 10:24am; Reply: 684
In the meantime here's a little story:
I recently put white wall trims on my wheels. In the process of doing this the spare ended up on the front nearside wheel. I then noticed it had a smaller profile tyre than the others, 78 instead of 80.
I went down to my local garage to see if they could swap the trim onto the other tyre so they are all the same size. One of the mechanics looked at the rear of the car and said the suspension was off. I asked him if that could be because of the odd size tyre and he said no.
I went back home and put the 80 tyre on so they are all the same and parked the car as flat as possible and took this picture.
What do you guys think?
Posted by: Richard B, June 9, 2017, 11:06am; Reply: 685
Is there any unusual wear in the tyres?

Inner edge or outer edge with thinner tread? That normally is evidence of incorrect alignment.
Posted by: garyf, June 9, 2017, 11:27am; Reply: 686
Paula

The rear camber looks normal to me for a Vitesse '6'

The Mechanics probably not used to seeing Triumph swing axle type suspension, with the Positive camber.

As Richard stated have a look for uneven tyre wear, if you do have excessive wear on the inside or outside of the tyres it may be worth getting the rear tracking checked and adjusted.

Gary
Posted by: Casper, June 9, 2017, 12:58pm; Reply: 687
Is the offside slightly higher ?  Check the wheel arch clearance.
Certainly nothing horrific.
C.
Posted by: Alex, June 9, 2017, 3:30pm; Reply: 688
I wish my spitfire was that lopsided........I find if I ignore it I can't see it anyway.
I like easy fixes and that's about as easy as they get  ;D
Posted by: Paula, June 9, 2017, 5:59pm; Reply: 689
The tyres all look great.
I'm not bothered by it at all.
I will have a good look around to see if anythings coming loose.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, June 9, 2017, 6:29pm; Reply: 690
Excess toe in can ramp the camber up , all   vit6  mk1 vits and heralds had severe positive camber
it the toe is wrong it make poor  even worse
if you have a hate for \-/  rear wheels you can fit a spacer block between spring and  diff 3/4" will
give you  |--|     this looks and handles much better

Or keep boot filled with a few sand bags
pete
Posted by: Paula, June 9, 2017, 6:29pm; Reply: 691
Quoted from Alex
I wish my spitfire was that lopsided........I find if I ignore it I can't see it anyway.
I like easy fixes and that's about as easy as they get  ;D


I think i will apply this fix too
Posted by: Paula, June 9, 2017, 6:31pm; Reply: 692
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Excess toe in can ramp the camber up , all   vit6  mk1 vits and heralds had severe positive camber
it the toe is wrong it make poor  even worse
if you have a hate for \-/  rear wheels you can fit a spacer block between spring and  diff 3/4" will
give you  |--|     this looks and handles much better

Or keep boot filled with a few sand bags
pete


Ok. It has never bothered me at all. But that is good to know
Posted by: JohnD, June 9, 2017, 6:36pm; Reply: 693
As you will know, Paula, the official camber setting for a Vitesse is PLUS two degrees, +/- one, so three is fine.   No modern technician will be used to such an odd arrangement, so discount the comments.   The simplest way to make it less positive is the spacer under the spring - if you want to,of course!
John
Posted by: Paula, June 9, 2017, 10:30pm; Reply: 694
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Excess toe in can ramp the camber up , all   vit6  mk1 vits and heralds had severe positive camber
it the toe is wrong it make poor  even worse
if you have a hate for \-/  rear wheels you can fit a spacer block between spring and  diff 3/4" will
give you  |--|     this looks and handles much better

Or keep boot filled with a few sand bags
pete


Is this spacer something you can buy off the shelf?
Just in case i change my mind!
Either that or a part number for sand bags?
Posted by: Spider, June 9, 2017, 10:51pm; Reply: 695


available from Canley Classics, and other sources
Posted by: Paula, June 9, 2017, 11:07pm; Reply: 696
Quoted from Spider


available from Canley Classics, and other sources


Thanks.
Might need that trolley jack after all!
Posted by: Richard B, June 10, 2017, 7:23am; Reply: 697
Quite bit of pushing and shoving required to fit one of these. As you have to remove the spring, fit the spacer and then refit the spring.

Also the height of the space is amplified with regards to the ride height. A 1" spacer is aimed at a really low "race" look. and requires longer diff studs and a mod (dent) to the spring cover plate.

If it has not bothered you before I would say go for the smallest spacer.
Posted by: Casper, June 10, 2017, 8:01am; Reply: 698
Run the car straight forward to a stop on level ground.
Go well to the rear of the car.
From near ground level sight along the sides of each rear tyre - you should be able to see about 1 tread block of the outside of the front tyre (front track was increased by addition of disc brakes).
Both sides should be the same.  Near enough is good enough.
Any excessive, small or unbalanced view(s) may indicate a need for action, or further investigation.

   xxxxx             Front                 xxxxx
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    xxxxx            Rear
    |
    |
    |
__|___________________
    |
    I
    |
    |
    xxxxx
    |

eye

C.
Posted by: Steve P, June 10, 2017, 8:53am; Reply: 699
Looks perfectly normal to me,if it was mine,and living in London with all the humps and potholes etc. i would just leave it.Or put a bag of cement in the boot.
Steve
Posted by: Alex, June 10, 2017, 9:34am; Reply: 700
Sorry I'm wondering if this has gone off on a tangent.....
I read Paula's post as she'd been told the car was higher one side than the other.....not the camber of the wheels looked wrong?
The wheels look pretty typical herald/vitesse camber to me unless a swing spring or spacer is fitted.
Yes the car may be leaning slightly but to be honest most do a little, as I said my 1500 spitfire does and it's not an issue and only obvious parked in my flat garage.

Maybe I've gotten the wrong end of the stick?
alex
Posted by: Pete Lewis, June 10, 2017, 10:32am; Reply: 701
good point,      I thought camber n/s looked more then o/s but pic is not that clear /shadows etc.

tape measure wheel arch to wheel rim       each side should be somewhat similar on flat ground

one thing that can hold thing up apart from toe error  is a tight  rear trunnion  

excess toe in will try to converge the wheels going forwards and raise the camber ,
going backwards will lower it  

and the positive camber look took kids to school , families on holiday and trips to tesco etc,  with out any problems for 40+ Years,  its whether you like or hate the appearance of pigeon toed cars  Ha!
Posted by: Spider, June 10, 2017, 4:44pm; Reply: 702
Quoted from Pete Lewis
good point,      I thought camber n/s looked more then o/s but pic is not that clear /shadows etc.

tape measure wheel arch to wheel rim       each side should be somewhat similar on flat ground

one thing that can hold thing up apart from toe error  is a tight  rear trunnion  


Another can be a twisted front anti roll bar, I didn't believe it either until I tried it on my GT6, it improved once I detached the ends of the ARB, not completely though as one rear  trunnion was very stiff too.

Posted by: JohnD, June 10, 2017, 5:13pm; Reply: 703
With respect, rather than squinting at the rear wheel from a distance, MEASURE the camber.

Camber gauges are available, but it's easy to make your own from a folded piece of sheet, a plumb line and some simple calculations.

Below is a picture of the gauge in use.  I'll be glad to send details of how to make one to anyone who wishes.

John
Posted by: Paula, June 19, 2017, 10:22pm; Reply: 704
Ok i have some reading to do! Sorry been away!
Posted by: Paula, June 19, 2017, 10:28pm; Reply: 705
Quoted from Casper
Run the car straight forward to a stop on level ground.
Go well to the rear of the car.
From near ground level sight along the sides of each rear tyre - you should be able to see about 1 tread block of the outside of the front tyre (front track was increased by addition of disc brakes).
Both sides should be the same.  Near enough is good enough.
Any excessive, small or unbalanced view(s) may indicate a need for action, or further investigation.

   xxxxx             Front                 xxxxx
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    xxxxx            Rear
    |
    |
    |
__|___________________
    |
    I
    |
    |
    xxxxx
    |

eye

C.


Brilliant! Thanks! It's actually not that easy to find level ground. I'll do this next time i go to Sainsbury's!
Posted by: Paula, June 19, 2017, 10:30pm; Reply: 706
Quoted from JohnD
With respect, rather than squinting at the rear wheel from a distance, MEASURE the camber.

Camber gauges are available, but it's easy to make your own from a folded piece of sheet, a plumb line and some simple calculations.

Below is a picture of the gauge in use.  I'll be glad to send details of how to make one to anyone who wishes.

John


I'm starting to recognise this as a classic (and very informed) John D response.
Love it
Posted by: Paula, June 19, 2017, 10:33pm; Reply: 707
Here is some light relief!
I went to Santa Pod and did this!
It's been a while since i was broken down and needing help. So thank you for getting me this far!
Enjoy my silly little video!

https://youtu.be/_h1EAl7OiF4
Posted by: JohnD, June 20, 2017, 10:35am; Reply: 708
Quoted from Paula


I'm starting to recognise this as a classic (and very informed) John D response.
Love it


Thank you, Paula!   I think.
If I'm either a Triumph guru or a nerd, I don't mind!     National Establishment for Research and Development?  


Well done at Santa Pod!     I would have been there if I hadn't needed an emergency mid-season engine rebuild, so the question of my social graces, or lack of, will have to wait another year.
Bests!
John
Posted by: Pete Lewis, June 20, 2017, 1:53pm; Reply: 709
and thats a well done from me

all the effort you have put in is paid back

glad you enjoyed it

Pete
Posted by: Steve P, June 20, 2017, 4:28pm; Reply: 710
Glad you didn`t try a burnout with that Triumph 4:11 diff!

The car was looking and sounding great,a bit unfair to put you alongside that Capri though.
Steve
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, June 22, 2017, 7:37am; Reply: 711
The biggest surprise in all of this is that you have a large tattoo on your arm. Just didn't expect you to really.

Car sounded nice too - but our cars (at least, as standard) are never going to be setting blistering quarter mile times.
Posted by: Paula, June 22, 2017, 5:48pm; Reply: 712
Quoted from Jonny-Jimbo
The biggest surprise in all of this is that you have a large tattoo on your arm. Just didn't expect you to really.

Car sounded nice too - but our cars (at least, as standard) are never going to be setting blistering quarter mile times.


Misspent youth!
Posted by: Paula, June 22, 2017, 5:51pm; Reply: 713
Well i eventually got the speedo fixed. All lovely and smooth now!
Turned out to be the 90' angle thing for the speedo drive.
I refitted the tunnel much better too and added some foil tape to help insulation.
It sounds a lot quieter and is a lot cooler in there now!
Posted by: Nick Jones, June 22, 2017, 6:21pm; Reply: 714
Ah, not a pleasant job and quite tricky to do right, especially with ill fitting fibreglass copies.  So worth doing right though!

Nick
Posted by: Jonny-Jimbo, June 23, 2017, 8:07am; Reply: 715
Quoted from Paula


Misspent youth!


It's hardly misspent if you have something to show for it  ;)
Posted by: Pete Lewis, June 23, 2017, 10:34am; Reply: 716
did you fit the spacer washer inside the angle drive ....without it it wont last long ????

Pete
Posted by: Pete Lewis, June 23, 2017, 10:35am; Reply: 717
did you fit the spacer washer inside the angle drive ....without it it wont last long ????

Pete
Posted by: Paula, June 23, 2017, 10:49am; Reply: 718
Quoted from Pete Lewis
did you fit the spacer washer inside the angle drive ....without it it wont last long ????

Pete


I bought one and it came with one too! There's a big note on Rimmer Bros.

I bought a new cable too, but it wasn't good. The speedo end wasn't finished properly so i didn't use it.
I should send it back really. I'm pretty sure i didn't break it as i had the end taped up when i pulled it through.
Posted by: glang, June 23, 2017, 10:59am; Reply: 719
Hi Paula, did you find anything else to do on the gearbox while the cover was off or anything to put on the future job to do list?
Posted by: glang, June 23, 2017, 11:02am; Reply: 720
And I think you'll be lucky to get your money back on the cable. However you could tell them about it so they have a look at the rest of their stock and maybe give you a future goodwill discount.....
Posted by: Paula, June 23, 2017, 11:08am; Reply: 721
Quoted from glang
Hi Paula, did you find anything else to do on the gearbox while the cover was off or anything to put on the future job to do list?


I topped it up and checked all the bolts were tight. it was a bit wet, but it only took 1 and 1/2 wesco oil cans.
I would like to get the carpets up and paint the floor.
Posted by: glang, June 23, 2017, 11:21am; Reply: 722
Good, its important that the to do list doesnt get too short! I stuck a layer of carpet over my gearbox cover (the thin foam backed stuff) as I dont have much insulation on the inside. It doesnt affect the carpet cover, helps reduce heat and compensates for the extra noise my dry run gearbox now makes ;D
Posted by: Paula, June 23, 2017, 11:44am; Reply: 723
The list is always getting longer!
Posted by: Mark Hammond, June 23, 2017, 6:03pm; Reply: 724
Dunno about a misspent youth, but you've certainly had a misspelt youth!   ;D

Mark
Posted by: Paula, June 23, 2017, 7:43pm; Reply: 725
Quoted from Mark Hammond
Dunno about a misspent youth, but you've certainly had a misspelt youth!   ;D

Mark


Dunt now wut u meen?
Posted by: Paula, June 24, 2017, 12:32pm; Reply: 726
There's some damage to the passenger door. Do you think i could tap it back, fill and paint this or is it a seam that needs welding?
It looks like there has been some damage before caused by the door opening too far and hitting the hinge.
Thanks!

Posted by: glang, June 24, 2017, 3:31pm; Reply: 727
wow it is keeping you busy! Yes it does look like the door restrainer hasnt done its job (something else to investigate ??) and allowed it to open too far so hitting one of the hinge bolts. I would gently push the damage back into place then rub down and clean the area before filling and can spraying. Fortunately white is an easier colour to match and you should be able to get an acceptable result. The alternative is to start digging and I can almost guarantee youll end up needing a new door skin or at least a repair panel made up and welded in......  
Posted by: Paula, June 24, 2017, 4:14pm; Reply: 728
I'll go with the filler option!
I will also need some check straps! They appear to be totally missing
Posted by: glang, June 24, 2017, 4:25pm; Reply: 729
That would explain it. Paddock do a kit for both doors at 17.50 + vat and del. Strange that theyve been left off though
Posted by: Nick Jones, June 24, 2017, 8:32pm; Reply: 730
Check straps may turn out to be lying in the bottom of the doors.  That's where they end up if they're not attached the A pillar when the doors are fitted.  Got any unexplained door rattles.....?  Of course you have, its a small chassis Triumph!

Tap back and fill for now probably.  I think there's a fair bit of filler in that area already....

Nick
Posted by: Paula, June 25, 2017, 2:47pm; Reply: 731
I've ordered the check straps.
I'll have a look in the doors! Didn't think about that!.
Did an OK job on the filling and paint. Colour match is great and it's nice and shiny, so very happy.
Thanks Again!
Posted by: glang, June 25, 2017, 4:07pm; Reply: 732
That doesnt look bad at all! Depending on much rain Feargal gets exposed to it the repair should last fairly well although I would put some money in the kitty for a future repairs. To put it off as long as possible make sure the drain holes in the bottom of the doors are kept clear and maybe take the door cards out to put some waxoyl or similar in the door seams.
Posted by: Paula, June 25, 2017, 4:20pm; Reply: 733
Since i re fitted the gearbox tunnel i've noticed the engine noise is much lower inside. Which is good.
But i also noticed a new noise from the gearbox.
It is very noticeable when i turn it over (so when the engine is turning slowest)
It also disappears when i put the clutch in.
I've recorded it. The squeak in my pushing the clutch pedal down and then up.
Hope you can hear it ok?
stop me if i'm getting to needy!

Posted by: Paula, June 25, 2017, 4:31pm; Reply: 734
Quoted from glang
That doesnt look bad at all! Depending on much rain Feargal gets exposed to it the repair should last fairly well although I would put some money in the kitty for a future repairs. To put it off as long as possible make sure the drain holes in the bottom of the doors are kept clear and maybe take the door cards out to put some waxoyl or similar in the door seams.


Top tips!
Posted by: glang, June 25, 2017, 4:38pm; Reply: 735
yes mine does that and it could be the input/mainshaft bearing or the layshaft bearings as both are turning only when the clutch is released. However it was recently pointed out on here that the noise could also be produced by the gears all spinning without any load on them so that they vibrate and rattle. The recommendation was to try selecting a gear by gently pushing on the lever without touching the clutch pedal so that a load is put the geartrain (obviously best to chock the car just in case it does go in gear) and the vibration is prevented. Then if theres still a noise its going to be one of the aforementioned bearings.
I havent tried it as its not going to make much difference either way and I'll only do anything if the noise starts to get worse....
Posted by: Paula, June 25, 2017, 4:43pm; Reply: 736
Quoted from glang
yes mine does that and it could be the input/mainshaft bearing or the layshaft bearings as both are turning only when the clutch is released. However it was recently pointed out on here that the noise could also be produced by the gears all spinning without any load on them so that they vibrate and rattle. The recommendation was to try selecting a gear by gently pushing on the lever without touching the clutch pedal so that a load is put the geartrain (obviously best to chock the car just in case it does go in gear) and the vibration is prevented. Then if theres still a noise its going to be one of the aforementioned bearings.
I havent tried it as its not going to make much difference either way and I'll only do anything if the noise starts to get worse....


Ok fab.
I was hoping it was just more noticeable or even amplified by the newly fitted cover. I'll ignore it!
Nice and easy.
Posted by: Mark Hammond, June 25, 2017, 5:18pm; Reply: 737
Sounds like clutch release bearing noise to me, I wouldn't worry too much about that.

Mark
Posted by: glang, June 25, 2017, 5:30pm; Reply: 738
Quoted from Mark Hammond
Sounds like clutch release bearing noise to me, I wouldn't worry too much about that.

Mark


I always thought the clutch release bearing would make a noise when the pedal is pressed and its under load not when its been released as is the case with both mine and Paulas...
Posted by: Mark Hammond, June 25, 2017, 8:00pm; Reply: 739
Not in my experience.

M.
Posted by: glang, June 25, 2017, 8:49pm; Reply: 740
Interesting maybe thats my problem then. Did the offending release bearing also make a noise when the pedal was pressed or only in the released position? And was it cured by fitting a new one?
Posted by: ferny, June 26, 2017, 5:31am; Reply: 741
Although different to yours, my release bearing makes a noise under partial load. A known issue for Exedy.
The TR6 does the same.
Posted by: Paula, June 26, 2017, 11:17am; Reply: 742
When i push the gearstick down (as if going into reverse) it gets better
Posted by: Paula, June 26, 2017, 11:24pm; Reply: 743
It's better if it's a release bearing I could probably do that.
Posted by: Mark Hammond, June 27, 2017, 4:52am; Reply: 744
Quoted from Paula
When i push the gearstick down (as if going into reverse) it gets better


But presumably you have the clutch depressed when you do that?

M.
Posted by: Paula, June 27, 2017, 9:43am; Reply: 745
Quoted from Mark Hammond


But presumably you have the clutch depressed when you do that?

M.


No just pushing the gear stick down before trying to engage
Posted by: Paula, June 27, 2017, 9:46am; Reply: 746
My Door Straps have arrived.
I've been looking at pictures, but i'm a little confused about how the rubber end attaches.
Posted by: glang, June 27, 2017, 10:41am; Reply: 747
Heres the manual diagram (GT6 but its the same) and you have to thread the strap in from inside the door so the arm pokes out and the rubber stop is inside. Then the pin attaches the end to the fixed part on the A pillar but dont forget to mount the sealing rubber cup onto the pillar first
Posted by: glang, June 27, 2017, 10:55am; Reply: 748
and again
Posted by: glang, June 27, 2017, 5:41pm; Reply: 749
Looks like everyone sells em like that so I assume the straight ones can still do the job....
Posted by: glang, June 27, 2017, 5:44pm; Reply: 750
No my fault, I posted the GT6 diagram and they are curved where as the Vitesse one should be straight ??)
Posted by: Paula, June 27, 2017, 5:52pm; Reply: 751
And sure enough. In the bottom of the doors!
Posted by: Paula, June 27, 2017, 5:58pm; Reply: 752
Quoted from glang
No my fault, I posted the GT6 diagram and they are curved where as the Vitesse one should be straight ??)


Ha ha! Ok good
Posted by: glang, June 27, 2017, 6:04pm; Reply: 753
well at least they look knackered so its been worth getting the new ones and of course its all added to the fun :X
Posted by: Paula, June 27, 2017, 6:08pm; Reply: 754
I made a video so the next idiot can see what you have to do. It's one of those jobs that is very easy if you know what to do.
Posted by: Nick Jones, June 27, 2017, 6:15pm; Reply: 755
Quoted from Paula
And sure enough. In the bottom of the doors!


They usually are.....

Nick
Posted by: glang, June 27, 2017, 6:19pm; Reply: 756
Maybe the video could go in the technical guide section on this site?
Posted by: Paula, June 27, 2017, 6:34pm; Reply: 757
Quoted from glang
Maybe the video could go in the technical guide section on this site?


That would be cool.

https://youtu.be/QzvFOPdlPkQ
Posted by: herald948, June 27, 2017, 8:52pm; Reply: 758
I'm curious: Has anyone determined what it is about these that "wears out"? Is it just that hunk of rubber? Does some bit of metal wear and/or lose tension?
Posted by: glang, June 28, 2017, 5:50am; Reply: 759
No nothing really wears out. The rubber deteriorates over time and maybe the spring clips lose tension/snap off or the bulges over which they slide wear down so that the opening locking action is reduced. Mine are over 50 years old and still going strong so the most likely problem is that they get lost during a rebuild of the car or get forgotten in the bottom of the doors ;)
Posted by: Nick Jones, June 28, 2017, 7:26pm; Reply: 760
The spring clips quite often break, loosing the locking action.  They're pretty tough things on the whole.

Nick
Posted by: glang, June 29, 2017, 9:09am; Reply: 761
Quoted from Paula
When i push the gearstick down (as if going into reverse) it gets better

Paula could your gearbox noise be the famous Triumph gearlever sizzle? If you have a worn components in the gear change linkage it can vibrate and generate noise which is especially noticable when stationary. This would then be reduced by pushing on lever....  

Posted by: Paula, June 29, 2017, 2:27pm; Reply: 762
Quoted from glang

Paula could your gearbox noise be the famous Triumph gearlever sizzle? If you have a worn components in the gear change linkage it can vibrate and generate noise which is especially noticable when stationary. This would then be reduced by pushing on lever....  



Maybe.
Posted by: Antonnick, July 25, 2017, 5:41pm; Reply: 763
Nearly a month gone by and nothing new from Paula - don't tell me she has sold it ?  :-/
Posted by: pimp my vit, July 26, 2017, 11:46am; Reply: 764
If she has can I have her sign in name, she seems gets a lot more responses than I do when looking for advice...
Posted by: glang, July 26, 2017, 5:29pm; Reply: 765
Quoted from pimp my vit
If she has can I have her sign in name, she seems gets a lot more responses than I do when looking for advice...


only if youre going to be as interesting and funny....
Posted by: yeti2, July 27, 2017, 9:39am; Reply: 766
Quoted from Antonnick
Nearly a month gone by and nothing new from Paula - don't tell me she has sold it ?  :-/



sold it in panic,now we're all going over to electric cars  ;D
Posted by: Dannyb, July 27, 2017, 8:31pm; Reply: 767
I was looking for her latest post. Nothing since her video on the door straps which I thought was good. Maybe she is working on a bigger video project,
Posted by: Paula, August 7, 2017, 3:05pm; Reply: 768
Quoted from pimp my vit
If she has can I have her sign in name, she seems gets a lot more responses than I do when looking for advice...


It's the charm and wit too.
Posted by: Paula, August 7, 2017, 3:10pm; Reply: 769
I've been working away, but the car is great, needed a little charge, but after 3 weeks sitting it starts and runs perfectly.
oh and my new gear knob arrived from Rimmers.
Posted by: John Bonnett, August 7, 2017, 4:00pm; Reply: 770
Thank goodness you're back. We've had grown men in tears here  ;D
Posted by: Paula, August 7, 2017, 4:33pm; Reply: 771
Quoted from John Bonnett
Thank goodness you're back. We've had grown men in tears here  ;D


Ha ha ha
Posted by: Paula, August 13, 2017, 9:57pm; Reply: 772
DAMMIT!
It fell out on the A40.
Can you still get replacement glass and the seal too?
Wish i'd gone back for it now.
Posted by: Mark Hammond, August 14, 2017, 3:00am; Reply: 773
Quoted from Paula
DAMMIT!
It fell out on the A40.
Can you still get replacement glass and the seal too?
Wish i'd gone back for it now.


Thought it was a Vitesse you had, not an A40..... ;)

Mark
Posted by: Casper, August 14, 2017, 7:53am; Reply: 774
Holdens ( https://www.holden.co.uk/search.asp?searchKeyword=mirror+glass ) used to do the glass
or SVC ( http://www.s-v-c.co.uk/category/mirrors/ )
but I don't know about the spring or retaining moulding.
If you can get glass (or a replacement head) then choose convex glass - much better field of view.

BTW, I love the selfie with the gear knob (although, personally, not a fan of that type of knob)

C.
Posted by: JohnD, August 14, 2017, 8:40am; Reply: 775
You might find one to fit at Halfords: http://www.halfords.com/motoring/car-accessories/replacement-mirror-glass

Or else, look up "Mirror glass cut to size" on Google, find a local glazier and take the mirror holder with you.   They won't supply a rubber surround, of course, but some silicone sealant, or 'gasket maker' could fix it in place, perhaps more securely!

John
Posted by: Paula, August 14, 2017, 10:47am; Reply: 776
Quoted from Mark Hammond


Thought it was a Vitesse you had, not an A40..... ;)

Mark


Groan.....
Posted by: Paula, August 14, 2017, 10:55am; Reply: 777
Ok so looks like a bit of a project. There is a glass cutting place near. I think i'll get one made.
Really wish i'd gone back for the rubber though!
Maybe this note someone left on my car will help!?
Posted by: JohnD, August 14, 2017, 11:03am; Reply: 778
That paper's been folded into a paper dart!

Did the author throw it from a car?!
John
Posted by: Paula, August 14, 2017, 11:06am; Reply: 779
Quoted from JohnD
That paper's been folded into a paper dart!

Did the author throw it from a car?!
John


It was actually squeezed through the passenger window.
I say squeezed. There's a pretty big gap there!
Posted by: marktheherald, August 14, 2017, 11:07am; Reply: 780
Always, always, always follow up offers of parts!  My set of Cosmic wheels came from a note on my screen..£50 the set..  Also someone disposing of a load of spitfire stuff.. And my factory workshop manual..    Like Forestt Gump's box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get!
Posted by: Paula, August 14, 2017, 11:09am; Reply: 781
Quoted from marktheherald
Always, always, always follow up offers of parts!  My set of Cosmic wheels came from a note on my screen..£50 the set..  Also someone disposing of a load of spitfire stuff.. And my factory workshop manual..    Like Forestt Gump's box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get!


Oooooo excited now!
Text sent!
Posted by: poppyman, August 14, 2017, 11:51am; Reply: 782
Quoted from Paula
DAMMIT!
It fell out on the A40.
Can you still get replacement glass and the seal too?
Wish i'd gone back for it now.


hi, you can make the seal out of a product called "sugru" its great stuff ;)
its on ebay in three different colours. around six pounds. its great for repairing bumper inserts as well 8)
cheers, tony.
Posted by: Paula, August 14, 2017, 11:58am; Reply: 783
Quoted from poppyman


hi, you can make the seal out of a product called "sugru" its great stuff ;)
its on ebay in three different colours. around six pounds. its great for repairing bumper inserts as well 8)
cheers, tony.


Thanks!
That looks perfect!
Posted by: Paula, August 14, 2017, 12:47pm; Reply: 784
I got a reply.
Anyone interested?
Posted by: JohnD, August 14, 2017, 2:32pm; Reply: 785
Quoted from Paula


It was actually squeezed through the passenger window.
I say squeezed. There's a pretty big gap there!


Lance by name and nature!
Posted by: Paula, August 14, 2017, 6:22pm; Reply: 786
Didn't think to search for DESMO on ebay.
Just bought this!
http://r.ebay.com/9KtDfl
Posted by: Paula, September 1, 2017, 10:56am; Reply: 787
I've had to disconnect my speedo.
I replaced the 90' bit that comes from the gearbox (and the washer) but the needle works fine for a bit and then makes a squawking noise and shots right up about 20MPH.
I disconnected it to save the speedo from damage.
I was wondering if the problem was the outer cable spinning. Should there be a washer at the speedo end too? Or maybe it just needs securing properly. I'd rather not have to take the gearbox cover off.
Anyone had this?
Posted by: glang, September 1, 2017, 12:15pm; Reply: 788
Hi Paula, dont think theres any washer certainly not on mine. Also the fault youve got could be in the speedo itself and thats what it sounds like cos inside you have a magnet spinning very close to a metal disc attached to a spring. The magnets field tries to turn the disc and the faster it spins (driven by the speedo cable) the further round the disc moves so giving a higher speed reading. The problems come when the components start to wear and the magnet can move closer to or even touch the disc giving it a sharp jolt.....
I believe they can be overhauled but its a specialist job as much for the replacement components needed as anything else or they come up on ebay but may also be knackered :B
Posted by: JohnD, September 1, 2017, 12:55pm; Reply: 789
Good diagnosis!

Well known and reliable instrument repairers. Include Speedy Cables: http://www.speedycables.com/m.repair.html

John
Posted by: Paula, September 1, 2017, 9:52pm; Reply: 790
Oh dear.
Sounds expensive!
Thanks though.
Posted by: scotty71, September 1, 2017, 10:02pm; Reply: 791
you could be looking at £100 repair bill.
Posted by: Paula, September 1, 2017, 10:07pm; Reply: 792
Quoted from scotty71
you could be looking at £100 repair bill.


eeeeep. But well worth it to keep it going, I'm guessing replacements are very rare.
I'll have a play tomorrow
Posted by: Paula, September 1, 2017, 10:12pm; Reply: 793
Well i could get a recon one for £86
https://www.rimmerbros.co.uk/Item--i-211403R
Posted by: Paula, September 1, 2017, 10:35pm; Reply: 794
I'd prefer to get it repaired though. I'm getting sentimental about parts now! What's happening to me??!!!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, September 2, 2017, 6:43am; Reply: 795
Start by remove the speedo
raise the tabs  on the chrome rim a little and rotate the rim to release the glass the rubber can be right sticky take time and care
once glass is off undo the two screws in the back and withdraw the mechanism

you will see the alloy disc and the spindle that drives is
dont remove the needle or you upset all the calibration
now you can with a small screwdriver twiddle the drive  
if it is stiff its lacking old grease on the main drive , some drops of engine oil will help , only drops not flood it.
The drive and disc should have no wobble or spindle play, if the disc is making contact with the drive magnet a gentle pry with a small screwdriver will soon re align the disc
if the needle spindle supports have worn out and this is wobbly then its a professional repairs is any other worn problem  but a quiet look see before you dig deep is well worth a try,  
Posted by: Paula, September 2, 2017, 8:13am; Reply: 796
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Start by remove the speedo
raise the tabs  on the chrome rim a little and rotate the rim to release the glass the rubber can be right sticky take time and care
once glass is off undo the two screws in the back and withdraw the mechanism

you will see the alloy disc and the spindle that drives is
dont remove the needle or you upset all the calibration
now you can with a small screwdriver twiddle the drive  
if it is stiff its lacking old grease on the main drive , some drops of engine oil will help , only drops not flood it.
The drive and disc should have no wobble or spindle play, if the disc is making contact with the drive magnet a gentle pry with a small screwdriver will soon re align the disc
if the needle spindle supports have worn out and this is wobbly then its a professional repairs is any other worn problem  but a quiet look see before you dig deep is well worth a try,  


Challenge accepted!
Posted by: Paula, September 2, 2017, 10:34am; Reply: 797
There is play in the disc. The face was also loose.
Posted by: Paula, September 2, 2017, 10:38am; Reply: 798
Here's a short video of the play
https://youtu.be/mu9CFbfhoPc
Posted by: Spider, September 2, 2017, 4:08pm; Reply: 799
Quoted from Paula
I'd prefer to get it repaired though. I'm getting sentimental about parts now! What's happening to me??!!!


You've been bitten by the Triumph bug, be careful, you will start buying random Triumph spares that you don't need but "may be handy later" and the next step will be buying another Triumph. There is a "Triumph anonymous" group for serial Triumph buyers. I confess I am one of those but I am down to two cars now well 3 as I am storing one for someone at present, funnily enough a Vitesse.
Posted by: Paula, September 2, 2017, 6:36pm; Reply: 800
Quoted from Spider


You've been bitten by the Triumph bug, be careful, you will start buying random Triumph spares that you don't need but "may be handy later" and the next step will be buying another Triumph. There is a "Triumph anonymous" group for serial Triumph buyers. I confess I am one of those but I am down to two cars now well 3 as I am storing one for someone at present, funnily enough a Vitesse.


I need a bigger house with a garage!
Posted by: Paula, September 2, 2017, 6:38pm; Reply: 801
I've reinstalled the speedo and it is much better. Maybe the loose face was causing problems too.
I turned the needle around a bit before i realised so now it's off under 30mph. I think a little turn +5mph will fix it though.
So i'm going to live with it.
Glad i gave it a go!
Thanks Pete!
Posted by: Pete Lewis, September 3, 2017, 12:00pm; Reply: 802
remember the guys making these parts were in days of factories ,''semi skilled'   not rocket scientists,  someone put these things together with
some tools and fixtures to aid reliable assembly ..    so some strong coffee and a will to look see can often work out as youve found out
its looking like long term the needle spindle bushes have worn , down to years of old or no lubrication  in the end it will need a prof  rebuild
good to live with it ...at least you know whats wrong and wont be fleeced .
well done

pete
Posted by: Paula, September 3, 2017, 11:24pm; Reply: 803
I bought this on ebay as it wa going cheap.
I've noticed it goes up to 120mph. 2 litre maybe?
Could i maybe just change the face? Maybe mark the position of the needle on the disc, pull it off and change the face.
And i've just realised i've started buying parts i don't really need......... Oh oh.
And it may not work at all!

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Classic-Smiths-British-Jaeger-Speedometer-Speedo-SN-6203-16A-Triumph-/232466338391?_trksid=p2047675.l2557&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&nma=true&si=PaKNkHyYtA%252Fyd6Acao6mNgAfgbQ%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc
Posted by: glang, September 4, 2017, 6:47am; Reply: 804
I believe any replacement needs to be exactly the same item Paula as the gearing inside is matched to the diff fitted to your vehicle plus the speedo drive gear in the gearbox. There should be a number at the bottom of the dial face which has to be the same.....
Posted by: RobPearce, September 4, 2017, 8:28am; Reply: 805
The number glang refers to is the "1248" on that eBay item, to the right of the needle hub, just below the trip meter. I think, from memory, that 1248 is the right gearing for a 1600 Vitesse, as it matches a Mk3 Spitfire. The 2L, I think, wants 1152. However, I'm at work and without access to any of my Triumphs at the moment so I can't check.
Posted by: Paula, September 4, 2017, 8:56am; Reply: 806
Quoted from RobPearce
The number glang refers to is the "1248" on that eBay item, to the right of the needle hub, just below the trip meter. I think, from memory, that 1248 is the right gearing for a 1600 Vitesse, as it matches a Mk3 Spitfire. The 2L, I think, wants 1152. However, I'm at work and without access to any of my Triumphs at the moment so I can't check.


I'm thinking maybe Mkii because it goes up to 120mph mine goes to 110mph
But if the gearing is the same maybe the face just needs changing..... I suppose at that price i could just give it a go!
Posted by: Paula, September 4, 2017, 9:02am; Reply: 807
The number on my speedo is 1184
Posted by: Paula, September 4, 2017, 9:10am; Reply: 808
see
Posted by: glang, September 4, 2017, 10:23am; Reply: 809
according to my computer you need a speedo with that same number as its the revolutions per mile. Of course thats assuming its the right one in the first place but maybe somebody on here can verify that......  
Posted by: RobPearce, September 4, 2017, 11:40am; Reply: 810
Well, this post on a US forum, and this post on here both agree that Heralds and round-tail Spitfires should be 1248, while 1184 is for a 3.89 diff (Vitesse 2L or GT6). It's possible the 1600 Vitesse uses a different drive ratio in the gearbox, I suppose, but I thought it was the same as the 4-cylinder cars.
Posted by: Spider, September 4, 2017, 3:33pm; Reply: 811
Quoted from Paula
I bought this on ebay as it wa going cheap.
I've noticed it goes up to 120mph. 2 litre maybe?
Could i maybe just change the face? Maybe mark the position of the needle on the disc, pull it off and change the face.
And i've just realised i've started buying parts i don't really need......... Oh oh.
And it may not work at all!

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Classic-Smiths-British-Jaeger-Speedometer-Speedo-SN-6203-16A-Triumph-/232466338391?_trksid=p2047675.l2557&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&nma=true&si=PaKNkHyYtA%252Fyd6Acao6mNgAfgbQ%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc


I did try to warn you Paula, however don't despair your speedo could be a spare for this one, which you know you want and it is for sale.
Posted by: glang, September 4, 2017, 4:01pm; Reply: 812
Is it possible it had a dashboard swop at some stage from a later car so ended up with the wrong ratio? Maybe originally it had this:  
Posted by: Mark Hammond, September 4, 2017, 6:52pm; Reply: 813
Is that dashboard for sale?

Mark
Posted by: glang, September 4, 2017, 7:04pm; Reply: 814
Its nothing to do with me Mark but is on ebay:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CoTriumph-Vitesse-6-late-1600-orig-nearly-complete-dashboard-very-good-condition-/122641068892?
Posted by: Mark Hammond, September 4, 2017, 7:13pm; Reply: 815
Seems a lot of money at £130 but maybe I'm out of touch.  You can't buy 'em new anymore......

Mark
Posted by: glang, September 4, 2017, 7:22pm; Reply: 816
Doesnt surprise me when Im seeing gear knobs at 25 quid+
Posted by: JohnD, September 4, 2017, 8:01pm; Reply: 817
There's someone on eBay trying to sell a six cylinder rear engine plate, for £20.  Been advertising it for months.
Not that much but about £19.99 more than  it's worth.
John
Posted by: Pete Lewis, September 5, 2017, 8:19am; Reply: 818
it amazes me  that many parts on ebay are priced way above whats available from most suppliers as a  new direct sale .

it pays to surf the parts prices
Pete
Posted by: Don Cook, September 5, 2017, 1:53pm; Reply: 819
Yeah...and don't waste your money on fancy jacks either. I keep this and him in the boot!
Posted by: Antonnick, September 11, 2017, 7:02pm; Reply: 820
There is an excellent article by Anthony Rhodes from 2002 on repairing the old Smiths and Jäger speedometers. There is all you Need to know about the suitablity of a e.g. "1248" gauge. Apologies it this is already known about

https://app.box.com/shared/embyus13g9

I used the excellent informations to convert the speedometer in my Morris to km/hr and the distometer to measure in km and not in miles. I would like to do the same for my Herald but have not yet found  a suitable donor.
Posted by: Paula, September 12, 2017, 6:08am; Reply: 821
Quoted from Antonnick
There is an excellent article by Anthony Rhodes from 2002 on repairing the old Smiths and Jäger speedometers. There is all you Need to know about the suitablity of a e.g. "1248" gauge. Apologies it this is already known about

https://app.box.com/shared/embyus13g9

I used the excellent informations to convert the speedometer in my Morris to km/hr and the distometer to measure in km and not in miles. I would like to do the same for my Herald but have not yet found  a suitable donor.


That is excellent!
Posted by: Paula, September 15, 2017, 5:47pm; Reply: 822
I decided to get a pro in to fit the windscreen rubber as i didn't fancy it on my own.
I'm glad i did as it took him nearly 2 hours and made him swear a lot!
I mentioned to him that one of my wipers wasn't cleaning the screen as well as the other. He said the springs might be worn.
I've just looked to buy a new arm and it seems there's a right and a left wiper. I'm sure mine are the same. Maybe i've got 2 lefts or 2 rights?
Can anyone tell me which is longest and how long they are. So i know which to replace.
Oh and he charged me £80. Fair for the work i thought. Especially as he came to me.
Posted by: Bitumen Boy, September 15, 2017, 7:00pm; Reply: 823
Would I be right in guessing it's the right hand wiper that's not working as well as the left? If so my Herald has the same problem. It seems to me that the wiper refills
available nowadays are rather too stiff to work well with the screen curvature on these cars. Last set I replaced I had trouble finding rubbers with the correct width
backing (9mm?) - they used to come with this and the narrower 6mm backing used on most cars in the same packet, but that seems to have ended.
Posted by: Paula, September 15, 2017, 7:39pm; Reply: 824
Quoted from Bitumen Boy
Would I be right in guessing it's the right hand wiper that's not working as well as the left? If so my Herald has the same problem. It seems to me that the wiper refills
available nowadays are rather too stiff to work well with the screen curvature on these cars. Last set I replaced I had trouble finding rubbers with the correct width
backing (9mm?) - they used to come with this and the narrower 6mm backing used on most cars in the same packet, but that seems to have ended.


It is the right one yes.
Hmm
Posted by: marktheherald, September 16, 2017, 7:54am; Reply: 825
Trawl through ebay for ORIGINAL Trico blades. They seem to work best.  Also Trico / Lucas.
Posted by: Paula, September 16, 2017, 9:48am; Reply: 826
Quoted from marktheherald
Trawl through ebay for ORIGINAL Trico blades. They seem to work best.  Also Trico / Lucas.


Great. Thanks!
Posted by: glang, September 16, 2017, 10:57am; Reply: 827
cos Im tight I got replacement silicone refill blades off ebay for a couple of quid and cut them down to fit the original holders. Lets face it our wipers are never going to be great and these work just as well as anything else Ive bought....
Posted by: Pete Lewis, September 16, 2017, 11:22am; Reply: 828
i changed mine to 7mm thick  adjustable length arms and this allowed longer blades to give more wipe area
the 7mm arms have more pressure on the screen that the weeny 5mm std arms

looked long at aero type blades but they all need a hooked arm you cant get them with the spline fitting
so upgrade t more modern is not an easy solution

got the 7mm arms and blades from selection from     https://www.vintagecarparts.co.uk/categories/vintage-car-parts-windscreen-and-wipers

Pete
Posted by: Bitumen Boy, September 16, 2017, 11:53am; Reply: 829
Quoted from glang
cos Im tight I got replacement silicone refill blades off ebay for a couple of quid and cut them down to fit the original holders. Lets face it our wipers are never going to be great and these work just as well as anything else Ive bought....


Likewise my approach. I have wondered if putting a few nicks in the backing strip with a fine saw might help them conform to the curvature of the screen, but haven't got round to trying it yet.

Of course part of the problem is that the wipers seem to be set up for left-hand drive as standard. Has anyone come up with a clever solution to this? Likely there would be an unwiped patch on the left instead, but that wouldn't be nearly as irritating as having it on the right.

Posted by: Mark Hammond, September 16, 2017, 7:03pm; Reply: 830
Chic Doig also sells the original "real McCoy".

M.
Posted by: Paula, September 17, 2017, 4:51pm; Reply: 831
I never knew there was so much in wipers!
Posted by: Pete Arnold, September 17, 2017, 6:14pm; Reply: 832
Quoted from Mark Hammond
Chic Doig also sells the original "real McCoy".

M.


They are excellent - I bought a pair off him last year.
Posted by: Paula, September 18, 2017, 10:23am; Reply: 833
Quoted from Mark Hammond
Chic Doig also sells the original "real McCoy".

M.


Oh. Never heard of him.
Good to know
Posted by: Mark Hammond, September 18, 2017, 3:04pm; Reply: 834
Quoted from Paula


Oh. Never heard of him.
Good to know


You need to acquaint yourself with him.  What he doesn't know about your car isn't worth knowing and what he doesn't stock isn't worth stocking.

M.

Posted by: Dogsbody47uk, September 18, 2017, 7:52pm; Reply: 835
Quoted from Mark Hammond


You need to acquaint yourself with him.  What he doesn't know about your car isn't worth knowing and what he doesn't stock isn't worth stocking.

M.



I second that! Cheers, Dave.
Posted by: Paula, October 23, 2017, 1:31pm; Reply: 836
I had a breakdown on Saturday. Not emotional just the car!
I was on the motorway humming along happily and the engine just quietly died, without any fuss at all.
I coasted over the 3 lanes to the hard shoulder and got out to have a look.
The first thing i noticed was the in line fuel filter was completely empty. I tried pumping some in and none came through, so i undid the jubilee clip before it and pumped until some came through. I tried to start it briefly but no go.
At this point a nice Herald owner pulled over with a pick up truck (i was suspicious at first to be honest).
He took the disto cap off and cleaned the rotor arm.
I tried to start again and still no go.
I then tried with some choke and it started. The inline fuel filter filled up completely and 2 small bits of black rubber flowed into it.
I'm thinking this was the problem all along, so i will be changing the rubber pipes for new. I already have some left over from doing the feed pipe to the fuel pump in the summer.
If the Herald guy is on here. Thanks very much! (but i am claiming it as a victory)  :)
I'm sure i was more happy to break down and fix it than to make the journey without any problems!!
Posted by: yorkshire_spam, October 23, 2017, 3:02pm; Reply: 837
Quoted from Paula

I'm sure i was more happy to break down and fix it than to make the journey without any problems!!

That's the club spirit right there in a single line!  ;)
Posted by: Nick Jones, October 23, 2017, 5:39pm; Reply: 838
Quoted from Paula


I coasted over the 3 lanes to the hard shoulder and got out to have a look.


Good to see that you were maintaining the Vitesse's natural position in the "overtaking" lane  :P

Quoted from Paula


I'm sure i was more happy to break down and fix it than to make the journey without any problems!!


Well, I can sort of relate to that although on the whole getting to the destination without drama is always plan A.  It's also pleasing if you can arrange to breakdown somewhere convenient (near parts shop / cafe) and pleasant (ie nice view on a warm dry day, under cover if raining, well lit if dark).  In general I'd rather be fixing someone else's car as that way I can still escape if I fail.....

Well done on getting it moving again and yes, new hose and clips is a good idea - just be careful what you get to replace it with as there's alot of unsuitable stuff out there.

Nick

Posted by: Mark Hammond, October 23, 2017, 5:57pm; Reply: 839
I'm a Herald owner but it wasn't me... ;)

M.
Posted by: Paula, October 23, 2017, 9:59pm; Reply: 840
Quoted from Nick Jones


Good to see that you were maintaining the Vitesse's natural position in the "overtaking" lane  :P



Well, I can sort of relate to that although on the whole getting to the destination without drama is always plan A.  It's also pleasing if you can arrange to breakdown somewhere convenient (near parts shop / cafe) and pleasant (ie nice view on a warm dry day, under cover if raining, well lit if dark).  In general I'd rather be fixing someone else's car as that way I can still escape if I fail.....

Well done on getting it moving again and yes, new hose and clips is a good idea - just be careful what you get to replace it with as there's alot of unsuitable stuff out there.

Nick



The most annoying breakdown so far was when a cable came loose on my alternator and the battery ran flat.
I was stuck for 3 hours only needing a jump start. I was in a garage and asked 2 people that came in, but no one would.
It was about 3am.
I wasn't happy to be broken down then!

Posted by: Pete Lewis, October 25, 2017, 7:51am; Reply: 841
guys laugh when i persist about the darn rubber slivers but they breed with every hose connection and now youve had some
cunning little blighters , float back and forth in the fuel lines as the pressure and flow work away and then , pop up and jam a port up

good to kown you coasted to the shoulder ok ,  some wont let you in when trouble strikes and that can be more dangerous

pete
Posted by: glang, November 1, 2017, 9:04am; Reply: 842
Quoted from Pete Lewis


good to kown you coasted to the shoulder ok ,  some wont let you in when trouble strikes and that can be more dangerous

pete


Thats one of the things I like about the Herald/Vitesse as its a friendly car and in general people are pretty helpful. Its why Im glad Im not driving an E type!

Posted by: Paula, November 9, 2017, 2:21pm; Reply: 843
Feargal is in for his 48th MOT today.
I am lucky enough to have all the MOT's going back to 1969. I thought it would be nice to take him back to the first for his 50th in a couple of years, so i dug out the first MOT and found out he was looked after by the famous Tourist Trophy Garage in Farnham.
Unfortunately no longer there, but with a very interesting history.

https://scarfandgoggles.wordpress.com/2013/05/16/visiting-the-t-t-garage-farnham/
Posted by: Paula, November 24, 2017, 12:20pm; Reply: 844
I'm going to have a crack at adjusting my doors tomorrow. My plan is to undo everything a bit and fiddle about until it looks right and then tighten it all back up again.
I read a post that JohnD suggested something like that.
Any top tips?
Posted by: glang, November 24, 2017, 2:10pm; Reply: 845
hmmmm that doesnt look like its going to be easy and might even be down to a bit of the dreaded tub spread (search other posts to frighten yourself). Over the years the bases of the B posts move apart so that although the door rear top fits the rear bottom sticks out and its difficult to cure because any adjustment at the hinges will affect the leading edge as well. Your best bet may be to adjust the door catch plate so that the door closes in further which should reduce the amount the bottom sticks out. It has the added benefit of improving the door sealing (reducing wind noise) but may increase the force needed to shut it. If after doing this you find the glass is pressing too hard against the seal (dont slam the door as it is possible to break the glass) you can gently bend the quarterlight frame out slightly.
First have a good look at it before undoing anything, for example from inside the car with the door closed you can slide a lolly stick around the seal to see how compressed it is and if theres any tight points.....
Posted by: Paula, November 24, 2017, 2:38pm; Reply: 846
Quoted from glang
hmmmm that doesnt look like its going to be easy and might even be down to a bit of the dreaded tub spread (search other posts to frighten yourself). Over the years the bases of the B posts move apart so that although the door rear top fits the rear bottom sticks out and its difficult to cure because any adjustment at the hinges will affect the leading edge as well. Your best bet may be to adjust the door catch plate so that the door closes in further which should reduce the amount the bottom sticks out. It has the added benefit of improving the door sealing (reducing wind noise) but may increase the force needed to shut it. If after doing this you find the glass is pressing too hard against the seal (dont slam the door as it is possible to break the glass) you can gently bend the quarterlight frame out slightly.
First have a good look at it before undoing anything, for example from inside the car with the door closed you can slide a lolly stick around the seal to see how compressed it is and if theres any tight points.....


Oh crikey.
Thanks!
Posted by: Nick Jones, November 24, 2017, 4:15pm; Reply: 847
It probably is worth a fiddle to see if you can make some improvement.  From the pics, you may get some gains but I doubt perfection is possible - though it's always a royal struggle on these!  Mark your starting points on the hinges though so you can get back there when patience wears thin!

Tub spread is definitely a possibility as it does produce that "sticky-out bottom corners" effect.  However, I have to disagree on the definition of tub-spread as it is actually the top of the B-pillars (ie where the door catches are) moving outwards.  It is fixable (not especially minor job) but definitely worth checking other factors first.

Other factors include
- general adjustment at hinges - on both door and A pillar
- Striker plate position
- Door shape.  That door looks to me as though it has been re-skinned and not very expertly.  One of the things that can go wrong is for the door to be twisted ("out of wind").  Part of the re-skinning process should be to fit the door to the car, twist it to suit, then put several decent tacks around the perimeter to hold it.  If this has not been done, or is not done right, the pressure of the door seal twists the door to look like yours.  Using the wrong, bubble-form door seals does not help.

Good luck.....

Nick
Posted by: JohnD, November 24, 2017, 4:40pm; Reply: 848
Gosh, Paula, so long since we heard from you, I thought Feargal must be running like a top!
And a door adjustment post attributed to me?  Shome mishtake shurley?    SofS does NOT have well fitting doors - if they stay closed, I'm happy.

But if I may
- the bolts on the door for in and out, on the A-post for up and down.
- Use a length of timber to lever the door, against only slightly loose bolts, unlikely to damage paint.  Or loosen it completely support it with carboard in the shutlines, and tighetn up.

Several videos online, as long as you don't mind being greeted, "Hi, y'all, dudes!"

John
Posted by: Alex, November 24, 2017, 5:28pm; Reply: 849
Might be worth removing the door seals before you adjust anything to make sure they are not half your problem?

Alex
Posted by: Paula, November 24, 2017, 6:08pm; Reply: 850
Quoted from Nick Jones
It probably is worth a fiddle to see if you can make some improvement.  From the pics, you may get some gains but I doubt perfection is possible - though it's always a royal struggle on these!  Mark your starting points on the hinges though so you can get back there when patience wears thin!

Tub spread is definitely a possibility as it does produce that "sticky-out bottom corners" effect.  However, I have to disagree on the definition of tub-spread as it is actually the top of the B-pillars (ie where the door catches are) moving outwards.  It is fixable (not especially minor job) but definitely worth checking other factors first.

Other factors include
- general adjustment at hinges - on both door and A pillar
- Striker plate position
- Door shape.  That door looks to me as though it has been re-skinned and not very expertly.  One of the things that can go wrong is for the door to be twisted ("out of wind").  Part of the re-skinning process should be to fit the door to the car, twist it to suit, then put several decent tacks around the perimeter to hold it.  If this has not been done, or is not done right, the pressure of the door seal twists the door to look like yours.  Using the wrong, bubble-form door seals does not help.

Good luck.....

Nick


I'm liking this almost optimism!
The doors have been reskinned by the previous owner and the more i look the more i find half done jobs.
I am confident i can make it better, at least good enough to stop people shouting "Oi! Your doors not shut love!"
I have a whole day off tomorrow so expect many more pictures!
Thanks!
Posted by: Paula, November 24, 2017, 6:10pm; Reply: 851
Quoted from JohnD
Gosh, Paula, so long since we heard from you, I thought Feargal must be running like a top!
And a door adjustment post attributed to me?  Shome mishtake shurley?    SofS does NOT have well fitting doors - if they stay closed, I'm happy.

But if I may
- the bolts on the door for in and out, on the A-post for up and down.
- Use a length of timber to lever the door, against only slightly loose bolts, unlikely to damage paint.  Or loosen it completely support it with carboard in the shutlines, and tighetn up.

Several videos online, as long as you don't mind being greeted, "Hi, y'all, dudes!"

John

Fab!
Just what i need.
I have a list of jobs, just to make sure you've all had enough of me by this time Monday!

Posted by: Paula, November 24, 2017, 6:14pm; Reply: 852
Speaking of annoying you all again.
I also want to fix my non flashing main beams.
Am i right in thinking they should flash when i pull the stalk towards me?
If it turns out to be the switch would this work?
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TRIUMPH-SPITFIRE-MK4-1500-GT6-MK2-3-2-POINT-LIGHT-SWITCH-STALK/253249300293?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649

I'm troubled by there only being 4 wires.
Posted by: Paula, November 24, 2017, 6:17pm; Reply: 853
Oh and i did this too.
So i could take it to the car with me.
http://www.club.triumph.org.uk/uploads/triumph_vitesse_wiring_diagram_3844.pdf
Posted by: Nick Jones, November 24, 2017, 6:38pm; Reply: 854
Regarding your main beam flash; I'm pretty sure that early cars did not have this facility.  Not sure when this came along date-wise but IIRC my early '65 registered Herald 1200 (so presumably late '64 build) did not have this from birth.  It's straight forward enough to add - you fit the later switch - with the minor complication that you have to find a permanent live power source for the flash contact.  Use a double bullet junction from the horn supply maybe?

Wiring diagram looks like a great idea - print A3 and laminate!

Nick
Posted by: Paula, November 24, 2017, 6:45pm; Reply: 855
Quoted from Nick Jones
Regarding your main beam flash; I'm pretty sure that early cars did not have this facility.  Not sure when this came along date-wise but IIRC my early '65 registered Herald 1200 (so presumably late '64 build) did not have this from birth.  It's straight forward enough to add - you fit the later switch - with the minor complication that you have to find a permanent live power source for the flash contact.  Use a double bullet junction from the horn supply maybe?

Wiring diagram looks like a great idea - print A3 and laminate!

Nick


Ooooooh. Well if it didn't have it i'm cool without.
Another job ticked off!
If anyone else wants that PDF full size let me know.
Posted by: Mark Hammond, November 24, 2017, 9:35pm; Reply: 856
My Mates 64 1600 did have headlamp flash, so yours should too!  Might be a fuse.

M.
Posted by: Paula, November 24, 2017, 9:37pm; Reply: 857
Quoted from Mark Hammond
My Mates 64 1600 did have headlamp flash, so yours should too!  Might be a fuse.

M.


Dammit.
Back on the list
Posted by: Nick Jones, November 24, 2017, 10:00pm; Reply: 858
If the light stalk does pull towards you against a spring then you should get a flash.  The other type of switch only has the 3 vertical positions and is fixed front/back.  Dunno that there is a fuse, unless it's that random inline one that I can only ever find when I'm looking for something else.....  Worth checking that the contacts are still there (one looks like a bit of an afterthought) and not horribly dirty/corroded.

Nick
Posted by: Paula, November 24, 2017, 10:16pm; Reply: 859
Quoted from Nick Jones
If the light stalk does pull towards you against a spring then you should get a flash.  The other type of switch only has the 3 vertical positions and is fixed front/back.  Dunno that there is a fuse, unless it's that random inline one that I can only ever find when I'm looking for something else.....  Worth checking that the contacts are still there (one looks like a bit of an afterthought) and not horribly dirty/corroded.

Nick


It does pull towards me. No click or anything satisfying.
I'll get the multi meter out
Posted by: Dave1360, November 25, 2017, 9:39am; Reply: 860
My 1963 1600 has the flasher although it wasn't working when I got the car.  I ended up taking the switch out and cleaned the contacts, then bending one of them slightly to make better contact.  It's been fine for the last year now.

Dave
Posted by: glang, November 25, 2017, 11:58am; Reply: 861
Quoted from Paula


It does pull towards me. No click or anything satisfying.
I'll get the multi meter out


You're not looking for excuses to put off the door adjustment I hope Paula ;D

Posted by: Paula, November 25, 2017, 1:52pm; Reply: 862
Happy with that!
Closes much easier too.
All the bolts were loose!
Thanks.
Posted by: JohnD, November 25, 2017, 3:36pm; Reply: 863
Wow! Paula, I'm bringing SofS to you for door adjustment!
John
Posted by: Nick Jones, November 25, 2017, 3:38pm; Reply: 864
Wow!  That's been a much bigger success than I would have dared hope!  The joys of Meccano cars....... :)

Good work!

Nick
Posted by: Paula, November 25, 2017, 5:05pm; Reply: 865
I only kicked it 2 or 3 times!
Posted by: mpbarrett, November 25, 2017, 8:31pm; Reply: 866
Quoted from Paula
I only kicked it 2 or 3 times!


If you are ever in Cambridge my Herald doors could do with a tweak.... :)
Great job!

cheers
mike
Posted by: Mark Hammond, November 25, 2017, 8:50pm; Reply: 867
Me too!

Mark
Posted by: Paula, November 25, 2017, 10:53pm; Reply: 868
I'll do a tour!
Posted by: Antonnick, November 26, 2017, 2:57am; Reply: 869
I wish my doors could be adjusted like that - it is tub spread measures for me at some time - the B post will probably break off in the process...... :-/
Posted by: glang, November 26, 2017, 9:38am; Reply: 870
Quoted from Paula
I only kicked it 2 or 3 times!


Looks good so are you going to treat the other door to some kicks?
Posted by: Paula, November 26, 2017, 10:22am; Reply: 871
Quoted from glang


Looks good so are you going to treat the other door to some kicks?


The other door was "treated". It looks better now. But needs more of a slam so i'm thinking the latch needs fettling a bit
Posted by: glang, November 26, 2017, 4:31pm; Reply: 872
Yes the latch is a good place to start but it could also be that the door now comes up against the seal too hard. With the latch I get as close as possible to it while gently closing the door with the handle button pressed in - there should be no contact noises until the door comes up against the seal and then on releasing the button the latch should fall into place. Obviously you want a bit of resistance against the seal but if its too much the door latch plate can be moved out slightly or if this means the door skin is no longer flush with the body you can bend the seal mounting flange inwards where needed, by hitting it with hammer and wooden dolly.
Hope this helps....
Posted by: Paula, November 29, 2017, 7:02pm; Reply: 873
Quoted from glang
Yes the latch is a good place to start but it could also be that the door now comes up against the seal too hard. With the latch I get as close as possible to it while gently closing the door with the handle button pressed in - there should be no contact noises until the door comes up against the seal and then on releasing the button the latch should fall into place. Obviously you want a bit of resistance against the seal but if its too much the door latch plate can be moved out slightly or if this means the door skin is no longer flush with the body you can bend the seal mounting flange inwards where needed, by hitting it with hammer and wooden dolly.
Hope this helps....


Ok. Got it.
I'll revisit this in the new year when i get some more Triumph time!
Posted by: Paula, December 3, 2017, 5:27pm; Reply: 874
I've spent the day taking the workings of a Spitfire Speedo i bought on ebay and putting in them into my old broken Vitesse Speedo.
I tried the Spitfire one in the Vitesse first and it was reading a little high, so i guessed that the workings are the same and just the front dial and the chassis need swapping (the mountain screws are in different places).
It's too dark to try it now, but assuming it works what do i have to do with the paperwork? MOT etc?
Thanks.

Posted by: Pete Lewis, December 3, 2017, 6:09pm; Reply: 875
Hope you didnt take the needle off the replacement , unless you mark the drive disc  it unwinds the coiled hair spring and needs alot of messing to get it back to read right
guess you  can check the readings against a portable sat nav or phone

speedos can read slow but never fast
quite a wide slow reading tolerance of 10%+4mph   so if it reads 70 at a true 60 its with in/ on spec
Hope it all works ok
as for odometer readings , a small note on the glass when you mot it (unless the rules change and no mot next year)
And if you wish return your V5 with a note explaining the change fill in the new reading in the  boxes on the form
pete
Posted by: Paula, December 3, 2017, 6:39pm; Reply: 876
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Hope you didnt take the needle off the replacement , unless you mark the drive disc  it unwinds the coiled hair spring and needs alot of messing to get it back to read right
guess you  can check the readings against a portable sat nav or phone

speedos can read slow but never fast
quite a wide slow reading tolerance of 10%+4mph   so if it reads 70 at a true 60 its with in/ on spec
Hope it all works ok
as for odometer readings , a small note on the glass when you mot it (unless the rules change and no mot next year)
And if you wish return your V5 with a note explaining the change fill in the new reading in the  boxes on the form
pete


I did mark the disc and i think it's under the correct tension. I did that by flicking the whole unit with my wrist and seeing how high i could get the needle before and after. Not very scientific.
Thanks for the info on the MOT/V5. I thought there would be a way
Posted by: Hogie, December 3, 2017, 6:54pm; Reply: 877


speedos can read slow but never fast
quite a wide slow reading tolerance of 10%+4mph   so if it reads 70 at a true 60 its with in/ on spec
Hope it all works ok


Hi Peter,
             you have that back to front.
They can over read by up to 10%  but never under read.  That way you e'er on the side of safety.

Roger

Posted by: thescrapman, December 3, 2017, 7:57pm; Reply: 878
You are both not quite right, modern cars are not allowed to read under, but can read up to 20% over, older cars (ours) can read 10% either way, so are allowed to under read.
Posted by: Paula, December 3, 2017, 8:09pm; Reply: 879
10% either way is what i always believed.
Pretty generous really
Posted by: John Bonnett, December 3, 2017, 8:13pm; Reply: 880
Quoted from Pete Lewis

speedos can read slow but never fast


Is that the right way round Pete?
Posted by: Pete Lewis, December 3, 2017, 10:06pm; Reply: 881
No I blame this silly tablet never types what you want  , sorry about that  being back to front
I plucked the standards we used when I ran  our factory tachograph calibration dept.  specs for speedos  but pre 1993 when we closed down.
pete
Posted by: Antonnick, December 4, 2017, 2:41am; Reply: 882
You should be able to reset the odometer to any reading you want by gently prising apart the plastic locking Lever(s) and moving the cogs. You only Need to do this if you are using the donor odometer of course.

When I did mine, in the end I kept the original odometer so this was not required.

The "recalibration" of the Speed can be done by testing against a sat.nav reading at a resonable Speed. If you travel at , say, 80km/hr per the sat-nav and the speedo is wildly off, either under or over, then the pointer can be removed and replaced accordingly.

To do this, you let the spring unwind by letting the pointer float behind the stop bar. Then remove the pointer and replace it in the estimated new Position, force it over the stop bar and test again. It Sound quite drastic but does work provided the Basic mechanics are Sound and the calibrated ratios are correct.
In other words you cannot mix say, a wolsey, hornet and Jaguar mk V. speedo.
Posted by: Paula, December 4, 2017, 10:14am; Reply: 883
Quoted from Antonnick
You should be able to reset the odometer to any reading you want by gently prising apart the plastic locking Lever(s) and moving the cogs. You only Need to do this if you are using the donor odometer of course.

When I did mine, in the end I kept the original odometer so this was not required.

The "recalibration" of the Speed can be done by testing against a sat.nav reading at a resonable Speed. If you travel at , say, 80km/hr per the sat-nav and the speedo is wildly off, either under or over, then the pointer can be removed and replaced accordingly.

To do this, you let the spring unwind by letting the pointer float behind the stop bar. Then remove the pointer and replace it in the estimated new Position, force it over the stop bar and test again. It Sound quite drastic but does work provided the Basic mechanics are Sound and the calibrated ratios are correct.
In other words you cannot mix say, a wolsey, hornet and Jaguar mk V. speedo.


I thought about resetting the mileage myself, but i bottled out. I'll try it on the old one first!
The needle can be spun on the shaft quite easily, but i found this didn't produce the results i was expecting. Then again that was with the faulty unit.

Posted by: Hogie, December 4, 2017, 10:37am; Reply: 884
Quoted from thescrapman
You are both not quite right, modern cars are not allowed to read under, but can read up to 20% over, older cars (ours) can read 10% either way, so are allowed to under read.


Thanks Colin,
                 I didn't know that.

Learning something new every day.

Roger
Posted by: Paula, December 4, 2017, 11:24am; Reply: 885
It's also good to know that your Sat Nav is likely to be more accurate on a straight and level road.
Quite obvious when you think about it, but i hadn't.

Simple article here https://www.driving.co.uk/car-clinic/car-clinic-which-should-i-trust-my-speedometer-or-my-sat-nav/
Posted by: JohnD, December 4, 2017, 6:50pm; Reply: 886
Straight - yes.   The satnav doesn't know you are going around corners and will take the straight line distance between update points, which will be less than your actual distance and so make your speed appear slower than it is.   If you travel across a semicircle, you will have gone, say, 10 units of distance, but travelled 10 x Pi/2 units around half a circle.   So you will have gone 15.7 units in the time that SatNav thinks you have done only 10, 50% faster than SatNav thinks you have.  But few can do that in a time thar will confuse SatNav.

But Level?    They always go on about "satnav can't see slopes, so you're going further than it thinks so will calculate a higher speed"  
Few slopes that anyone will ascend by car will be more than 10%, which means that you gain 1 meter (or whatever) for every 10 that you travel on the level.
The angle between the two lines will be 5.671 degrees.

Now the ratio between the Hypoteneuse (the sloping bit) and the level is determined by the Cosine of that angle, 0.995, so that 10 units on the level will mean 10,05 on the slope, and the satNav gods will estimate that you have travelled 10 units when in fact you have done 10.05.  Your speed will be underestimated by a massive 0.005%

Hooray for Maths!  The Queen of Science!
John
Posted by: Paula, December 4, 2017, 7:06pm; Reply: 887
Quoted from JohnD
Straight - yes.   The satnav doesn't know you are going around corners and will take the straight line distance between update points, which will be less than your actual distance and so make your speed appear slower than it is.   If you travel across a semicircle, you will have gone, say, 10 units of distance, but travelled 10 x Pi/2 units around half a circle.   So you will have gone 15.7 units in the time that SatNav thinks you have done only 10, 50% faster than SatNav thinks you have.  But few can do that in a time thar will confuse SatNav.

But Level?    They always go on about "satnav can't see slopes, so you're going further than it thinks so will calculate a higher speed"  
Few slopes that anyone will ascend by car will be more than 10%, which means that you gain 1 meter (or whatever) for every 10 that you travel on the level.
The angle between the two lines will be 5.671 degrees.

Now the ratio between the Hypoteneuse (the sloping bit) and the level is determined by the Cosine of that angle, 0.995, so that 10 units on the level will mean 10,05 on the slope, and the satNav gods will estimate that you have travelled 10 units when in fact you have done 10.05.  Your speed will be underestimated by a massive 0.005%

Hooray for Maths!  The Queen of Science!
John


Well that's that sorted then! Straight-Yes Curves-No and hills? Don't worry about it!
Posted by: pimp my vit, December 4, 2017, 8:28pm; Reply: 888
Well maths is not my subject but I know a fair bit about sat nav's and the good ones (Clarion for instance) have 3d gyroscope in them that will measure the rise and fall of the road and compensate for it.

However I don't think the average portable sat nav will have such a feature.
Posted by: Paula, December 4, 2017, 8:37pm; Reply: 889
Quoted from pimp my vit
Well maths is not my subject but I know a fair bit about sat nav's and the good ones (Clarion for instance) have 3d gyroscope in them that will measure the rise and fall of the road and compensate for it.

However I don't think the average portable sat nav will have such a feature.


Or my smartphone
Posted by: Pete Lewis, December 5, 2017, 8:00pm; Reply: 890
And if all else fails there is for police to do an old fashioned time test most authorities have black and white short poles set at 1/4 mile intervals normally on straight main roads
So at 60 one post every 15 seconds  or 30s at 30
keep a lookout you may spot some
pete
Posted by: JohnD, December 5, 2017, 10:42pm; Reply: 891
Pete, Paula,
  I've never seen those posts beside main roads.   Occasional squares of white tarmac on the surface,  that used to be for Police Vascar speed measurement calibration, before satnav and radar guns. They will be  known (to the Police) distance apart.

BUT, all motorways have white posts every 100 meters, the ones with a little phone sign and an arrow, so the broken down motorist can go the the nearest.

Get a friend to time how long you take to pass 10 of those. That's a kilometer.   If that is X minutes, then 60/X = Kilometers per hour, which Google will convert it to MPH.  And that's just arithmetic!
Drive at a constant speed while they time you!

John
Posted by: Casper, December 6, 2017, 8:54am; Reply: 892
Quoted Text
They will be  known (to the Police) distance apart.

Actually, no.  Any feature, even a transient one, could be used to measure distance with Vascar (Visual Average Speed Computer And Recorder).  The time counter was triggered when the (potentially) offending vehicle passed the mark, and the distance measure was triggered when the following police vehicle passed the mark, so the distance was measured each time.  The marks you mention were used on roads where no shadows, bridges, etc. could be used.  They would be a minimum distance apart.
C.
Posted by: Rosbif, December 6, 2017, 11:21am; Reply: 893
The way I do it is:

Circle the date on the calendar, go for a drive and then mark the date I get back. Divide the distance covered by the number of days, hey presto!  ;D

OK so I drive slower than you lot (sleep)
Posted by: Nick Jones, December 6, 2017, 7:15pm; Reply: 894
Sat nav will be far more accurate that the original speedo in almost all conditions.  No need for more exotic methods.

How about the odometer though?  Does your new speedo have the same turns per mile (tpm) as the old one.  It's marked on the face, just under the trip display usually.

Nick
Posted by: Paula, December 7, 2017, 10:06pm; Reply: 895
Quoted from Nick Jones
Sat nav will be far more accurate that the original speedo in almost all conditions.  No need for more exotic methods.

How about the odometer though?  Does your new speedo have the same turns per mile (tpm) as the old one.  It's marked on the face, just under the trip display usually.

Nick


This number?
Posted by: Nick Jones, December 7, 2017, 10:12pm; Reply: 896
Yep.  That's the one.

Nick
Posted by: Paula, December 7, 2017, 10:14pm; Reply: 897
Quoted from Nick Jones
Yep.  That's the one.

Nick


Woo Hoo all good!
Thanks
Posted by: Paula, December 7, 2017, 10:26pm; Reply: 898
Quoted from Pete Lewis
And if all else fails there is for police to do an old fashioned time test most authorities have black and white short poles set at 1/4 mile intervals normally on straight main roads
So at 60 one post every 15 seconds  or 30s at 30
keep a lookout you may spot some
pete


Old school!
Like it
Posted by: Paula, December 7, 2017, 10:27pm; Reply: 899
Quoted from Rosbif
The way I do it is:

Circle the date on the calendar, go for a drive and then mark the date I get back. Divide the distance covered by the number of days, hey presto!  ;D

OK so I drive slower than you lot (sleep)


Brilliant!
Posted by: Paula, December 10, 2017, 6:28pm; Reply: 900
I have tested the speedo against my sat nav and i am very pleased and i can now state:
A Triumph Vitesse Speedo is the same as a Triumph Spitfire speedo. You just need to swap the facia. Well at least this one was!
Posted by: Bitumen Boy, December 10, 2017, 6:39pm; Reply: 901
I think you're just born lucky, Paula. Some people are but I'm not one of them...
Posted by: Paula, December 10, 2017, 6:53pm; Reply: 902
Quoted from Bitumen Boy
I think you're just born lucky, Paula. Some people are but I'm not one of them...


I'm not sure about that, i have already changed the Drive pinion and cable. (actually cable twice)
;D
Posted by: Bitumen Boy, December 11, 2017, 8:25am; Reply: 903
Quoted from Paula


I'm not sure about that, i have already changed the Drive pinion and cable. (actually cable twice)
;D


The doors convinced me. I once spent a whole day faffing around trying to adjust just one door and finally succeeded in putting it back to where it started. You've done rather better than that  :)
Posted by: Paula, December 11, 2017, 10:00am; Reply: 904
Pure skill
Posted by: JohnD, December 11, 2017, 5:19pm; Reply: 905
Quoted from Paula
Pure skill


Genius!
Posted by: daver clasper, December 11, 2017, 6:29pm; Reply: 906
A goddess, deffo

Could that mean that some/most/all of those Smiths/Jaagar type of clocks from that era have the same measurement mechanics? anyone.
Posted by: Paula, December 11, 2017, 7:15pm; Reply: 907
Quoted from daver clasper
A goddess, deffo

Could that mean that some/most/all of those Smiths/Jaagar type of clocks from that era have the same measurement mechanics? anyone.


Definitely (she lied)
Posted by: Antonnick, December 11, 2017, 8:56pm; Reply: 908
Quoted from daver clasper
A goddess, deffo

Could that mean that some/most/all of those Smiths/Jaagar type of clocks from that era have the same measurement mechanics? anyone.


Differences explained here

http://obswww.unige.ch/~wildif/cars/docs/Smith-jaeger_speedo_repair.pdf

Posted by: Paula, December 19, 2017, 2:45pm; Reply: 909
I'm back to fiddling with the fuel gauge.
I bought a Bi Metal Strip one off ebay for £5 and that cleaned up nicely and seems to work.
The level seems to go up and down depending on if the lights are on or if the engine is running too though.
Ah ha! I thought. Voltage Stabilization! That's what i need!
I've just been trying to get anything out of the little box. I plugged the 12v supply into B and the Gauge into I and earthed the little box, but i'm getting nothing. Zilch, Nadda!
I had an old stabilizer on the back of the speedo i bought and i tried that one too. Still nothing.
Am i being dumb?
Posted by: Paula, December 19, 2017, 2:51pm; Reply: 910
I did this
Posted by: Paula, December 19, 2017, 2:57pm; Reply: 911
should i have done this? would it matter?
Posted by: Pete Lewis, December 19, 2017, 2:58pm; Reply: 912
thats looking correct
try if you jump the stabiliser and just join battery to gauge it should give a very full reading
if so the stabilser is duff.  also to  remove the float from the problem, short the sender lead to earth should also give a full reading if not consider the float unit has a problem

quick question  when all is working do your gauges needles move slowly to a reading or jump staright to it ??

the fact the reading change with engine /car voltage indicates the stabilser is defunct , youre on the right track

Pete
Posted by: JohnD, December 19, 2017, 5:40pm; Reply: 913
Paula,
I'm sure you have a multimeter, to do a stabiliser check.
Put that on 'I' and connect 'B' to battery.   Both M'meter and stabiliser body earthed to the negative pole.    You should see "12-0-12-0"Volts alternating at I.     If you see 12V or anything else, 'stabiliser' is dead.

Despite it being a "stabiliser" this is what it does.  It averages the volts out to 10V, whatever the violts at the battery, which can be more if the charging system is active.   Your gauges are heavily damped, so won't 'see' the variation.

If it is working, then when installed try a jumper lead to earth the body.   It's supposed to earth tbhpugh the speedometer gauge body, but ....

JOhn
Posted by: Paula, December 19, 2017, 6:40pm; Reply: 914
Sorry for the delay in replying!
I'll try that tomorrow.
I'm thinking maybe the stabilizer isn't working. Should i get continuity through it? I don't
It is brand new
Posted by: Paula, December 19, 2017, 6:45pm; Reply: 915
Quoted from JohnD
Paula,
I'm sure you have a multimeter, to do a stabiliser check.
Put that on 'I' and connect 'B' to battery.   Both M'meter and stabiliser body earthed to the negative pole.    You should see "12-0-12-0"Volts alternating at I.     If you see 12V or anything else, 'stabiliser' is dead.

Despite it being a "stabiliser" this is what it does.  It averages the volts out to 10V, whatever the violts at the battery, which can be more if the charging system is active.   Your gauges are heavily damped, so won't 'see' the variation.

If it is working, then when installed try a jumper lead to earth the body.   It's supposed to earth tbhpugh the speedometer gauge body, but ....

JOhn


Sorry John.
Just seen this too.
That's very helpful
I'm back on it tomorrow.
Posted by: Paula, December 19, 2017, 7:06pm; Reply: 916
Is there a reason not use something like this?
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/10psc-L78XXCV-VOLTAGE-REGULATOR-5V-6V-8V-9V-10V-12V-15V/172377863651?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&var=471204682864&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2648
Posted by: JohnD, December 19, 2017, 8:02pm; Reply: 917
Being complete electronic numpty, I couldn't possibly say, but transistorised stabilizers areavaiab!e specifically for our cars: see https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_odkw=landrover+voltage+stabiliser+solid+state&_osacat=0&_from=R40&_trksid=p2045573.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0.Xvoltage+stabiliser+solid+state.TRS0&_nkw=voltage+stabiliser+solid+state&_sacat=0

John
Posted by: Paula, December 19, 2017, 8:33pm; Reply: 918
Quoted from JohnD


I think someone has just put some cables on a 25p part and is charging £10 there.
There is a page that shows you how to change the box over to electronic here http://www.triumphclub.co.nz/?page_id=962
It looks very simple. I might have a go at this if i find my stabilizer is knackered. At least i get 10 for about £2.50
Posted by: JohnD, December 19, 2017, 8:50pm; Reply: 919
I'll look forward to a success story!

John
Posted by: Paula, December 19, 2017, 8:52pm; Reply: 920
Quoted from JohnD
I'll look forward to a success story!

John


Or 10 little blue puffs of smoke!
Posted by: Nick Jones, December 19, 2017, 10:03pm; Reply: 921
Quoted from Paula


I think someone has just put some cables on a 25p part and is charging £10 there.
There is a page that shows you how to change the box over to electronic here http://www.triumphclub.co.nz/?page_id=962
It looks very simple. I might have a go at this if i find my stabilizer is knackered. At least i get 10 for about £2.50


Yes, you are exactly right. 10v version should work fine.  The originals are pretty robust and long-lived normally though.

Nick
Posted by: Paula, December 20, 2017, 1:26am; Reply: 922
Quoted from JohnD
Paula,
I'm sure you have a multimeter, to do a stabiliser check.
Put that on 'I' and connect 'B' to battery.   Both M'meter and stabiliser body earthed to the negative pole.    You should see "12-0-12-0"Volts alternating at I.     If you see 12V or anything else, 'stabiliser' is dead.

Despite it being a "stabiliser" this is what it does.  It averages the volts out to 10V, whatever the violts at the battery, which can be more if the charging system is active.   Your gauges are heavily damped, so won't 'see' the variation.

If it is working, then when installed try a jumper lead to earth the body.   It's supposed to earth tbhpugh the speedometer gauge body, but ....

JOhn


Me and the Cat have done this test straight onto a battery and nothing at all on either of them. Sometimes one jumps into life, but i'm pretty sure they are both knackered. I've tried both digital and analogue meters too
I'll wait for the postman to bring the solid state ones.
1:30am.
At least the cat is happy!
Posted by: JensH, December 20, 2017, 8:20am; Reply: 923
Quoted from Paula


I think someone has just put some cables on a 25p part and is charging £10 there.
There is a page that shows you how to change the box over to electronic here http://www.triumphclub.co.nz/?page_id=962
It looks very simple. I might have a go at this if i find my stabilizer is knackered. At least i get 10 for about £2.50


Jeps, very easy and just go for the 10V version as Nick pointed out.
Then - just make sure you have a fuse to catch the smoke  :-)

PS! Have two cats hanging around me when working on my cars, electronics, what ever - always very interesting company  8)
Posted by: JohnD, December 20, 2017, 9:09am; Reply: 924
Quoted from Paula


I think someone has just put some cables on a 25p part and is charging £10 there.
There is a page that shows you how to change the box over to electronic here http://www.triumphclub.co.nz/?page_id=962
It looks very simple. I might have a go at this if i find my stabilizer is knackered. At least i get 10 for about £2.50


That is a little unkind!    Recently, in Another Place, I related doing some engine work,and an interested reader asked how much, so I costed it.   By far the biggest component was my time, which even to a fellow Triumphero has to be included, andi wohldcost as much as anyone e doing commercially.   I can't guess at labour cost for the assembled solid state device, but it could take nearly an hour to make it, and £10/hour is little above minimum wage.

Using your own time is free-ish.   Without that almost all classics would be beancans by now!  When you report back, I shall be inspired to challenge be the two Monsters of Electrickery, the Volt and the Amp!

John
Posted by: Paula, December 20, 2017, 10:42am; Reply: 925
Quoted from JohnD


That is a little unkind!    Recently, in Another Place, I related doing some engine work,and an interested reader asked how much, so I costed it.   By far the biggest component was my time, which even to a fellow Triumphero has to be included, andi wohldcost as much as anyone e doing commercially.   I can't guess at labour cost for the assembled solid state device, but it could take nearly an hour to make it, and £10/hour is little above minimum wage.

Using your own time is free-ish.   Without that almost all classics would be beancans by now!  When you report back, I shall be inspired to challenge be the two Monsters of Electrickery, the Volt and the Amp!

John


Fair point.
I'm sure when i'm into my 3rd hour and 4th nail i'll be cursing my words!


Posted by: Paula, December 20, 2017, 11:23am; Reply: 926
Well how about that.
The new replacements are electronic too!
Posted by: dinger, December 20, 2017, 12:40pm; Reply: 927
They look more realistic .. my 1972 1300 Dolomite still has the original which only needs a regular clean .. exposed components give me the willies..
Posted by: scotty71, December 20, 2017, 12:43pm; Reply: 928
Paula, this might be a silly question! is the car positive or neg earth? being the body of the stabilizer will go the ground, and could be shorting out!
Posted by: Paula, December 20, 2017, 12:46pm; Reply: 929
Quoted from scotty71
Paula, this might be a silly question! is the car positive or neg earth? being the body of the stabilizer will go the ground, and could be shorting out!


It's negative earth. I've done a alternator conversion too.
I've opened up the older stabilizer i had and you can see and smell that it's burnt out.
So it's looking likely that was the problem. I can't really tell with the new one i bought. All i know is it doesn't output anything.
I probably blew it up
Posted by: scotty71, December 20, 2017, 1:33pm; Reply: 930
the transistor which is in the stabilizer will go pop.
090701
Dashboard Voltage Stabilizer   Voltage Stabilizer - Negative Earth  this from AES https://www.autoelectricsupplies.co.uk/product/1062
try them for the parts. I have brought parts from them, they are good company.
Posted by: Bitumen Boy, December 20, 2017, 3:20pm; Reply: 931
Quoted from Paula


Paula, I did just that a couple of years ago. Following advice from someone who knows a damn sight more than me about such things I added a capacitor between 12v and earth to smooth out the inevitable voltage spikes from a dynamo charging system. The capacitor you need is rated 0.047uF, 100v  - they're not polarity sensitive so no worries there. Soldered the two components together with flying leads and insulated with heatshrink sleeving and fitted in place of the old one, works fine and works out a deal cheaper than a repro. The knackered one I took off was also an electronic repro identical to the photo you posted - don't know why it failed but I wonder if the heatsinking is inadequate leading to them getting too warm? IIRC I bolted the replacement to the underside of the bulkhead "shelf" instead, that'll never heat up in normal use.
Posted by: Paula, December 20, 2017, 7:01pm; Reply: 932
Quoted from Bitumen Boy


Paula, I did just that a couple of years ago. Following advice from someone who knows a damn sight more than me about such things I added a capacitor between 12v and earth to smooth out the inevitable voltage spikes from a dynamo charging system. The capacitor you need is rated 0.047uF, 100v  - they're not polarity sensitive so no worries there. Soldered the two components together with flying leads and insulated with heatshrink sleeving and fitted in place of the old one, works fine and works out a deal cheaper than a repro. The knackered one I took off was also an electronic repro identical to the photo you posted - don't know why it failed but I wonder if the heatsinking is inadequate leading to them getting too warm? IIRC I bolted the replacement to the underside of the bulkhead "shelf" instead, that'll never heat up in normal use.


Thanks for that.
Do you think i'll need the capacitor with a alternator? I like the idea of attaching it to the bulk head
Posted by: Bitumen Boy, December 20, 2017, 7:47pm; Reply: 933
Quoted from Paula


Thanks for that.
Do you think i'll need the capacitor with a alternator? I like the idea of attaching it to the bulk head


I don't know whether the capacitor is necessary with an alternator, but for the price of the capacitor I'd be inclined to include it anyway - it won't do any harm.

It might depend on the alternator itself, a modern one would likely be OK but I've heard the older Lucas types often don't regulate much better than the dynamo control box.

Posted by: Paula, December 20, 2017, 7:54pm; Reply: 934
Done.
99p for 5!
Posted by: RobPearce, December 22, 2017, 5:04pm; Reply: 935
The manufacturer's data sheet for those voltage regulator chips nearly always specifies a local capacitor on both input and output. How critical they are, and what value they need to be, depends on the particular chip and application. I'd fit them as a matter of course. The dynamo vs. alternator question is beside the point if the chip is supposed to have those capacitors even when the incoming voltage is fully clean!
Posted by: Paula, December 22, 2017, 6:38pm; Reply: 936
Quoted from RobPearce
The manufacturer's data sheet for those voltage regulator chips nearly always specifies a local capacitor on both input and output. How critical they are, and what value they need to be, depends on the particular chip and application. I'd fit them as a matter of course. The dynamo vs. alternator question is beside the point if the chip is supposed to have those capacitors even when the incoming voltage is fully clean!


I've stuck one on the In V to Earth.
I couldn't fit it in the box so it's living outside.
I haven't fitted it yet.
Posted by: Paula, December 22, 2017, 6:44pm; Reply: 937
Here's what i made.
If i was to sell them it would be about £50 each! There's not a lot of space in there! Took ages with my limited skills. I think i used too much wire and it filled the space.
The capacitor lives outside in the breeze.
Multimeter is happy though!
Posted by: Paula, December 27, 2017, 7:13pm; Reply: 938
Hello!
Happy Xmas everyone!
I've fitted the new voltage regulator i made and the gauge looks solid as a rock.
I want to get an idea of what it's telling me though. I've used reserve once and it worked, now i want to know where that is on the gauge.
Can anyone tell me how much is in reserve? I know it's a 40 ltr tank from the workshop manual, but i can't find out how much is left in the bottom for reserve.
Thanks!
Paula.
Posted by: Nick Jones, December 27, 2017, 7:35pm; Reply: 939
Supposedly 1 gallon/4.5L.  They vary though as it's a function of the curve of the pick-up pipe.

On mine, which draws from the bottom via a small stand-up in the drain bung it keeps pulling until the gauge has gone to just below the empty line.  However, because every time this has happened I've ended up having to dump the jerrycan into it to reach the next filling station, I've still never done a completely-empty-to-completely-full fill test.  It's more than 40L though.

Nick
Posted by: JohnD, December 27, 2017, 8:22pm; Reply: 940
That's 'jerrycan' as in good old Wehrmacht three handled, 20 litre jobbie?   I've weighed my two,  drained and  bone dry, so  I can weigh them part full.  Weighedboth in case they are different, and they are!  Fuel's lighter than water so  about 0.75l/kg.  

Sorry,  Paula, I don't have a standard tank any more, but that method will work .  Yer standard plastic 5  litre fuel can  holds a bit more, but filling station pumps are accurate - by statute!
John

PS well done with the stabiliser!  
Posted by: Paula, December 27, 2017, 9:08pm; Reply: 941
Quoted from Nick Jones
Supposedly 1 gallon/4.5L.  They vary though as it's a function of the curve of the pick-up pipe.

On mine, which draws from the bottom via a small stand-up in the drain bung it keeps pulling until the gauge has gone to just below the empty line.  However, because every time this has happened I've ended up having to dump the jerrycan into it to reach the next filling station, I've still never done a completely-empty-to-completely-full fill test.  It's more than 40L though.

Nick


Oh that's not much is it?
Must purchase a jerry can!
Posted by: Paula, December 27, 2017, 9:13pm; Reply: 942
Quoted from JohnD
That's 'jerrycan' as in good old Wehrmacht three handled, 20 litre jobbie?   I've weighed my two,  drained and  bone dry, so  I can weigh them part full.  Weighedboth in case they are different, and they are!  Fuel's lighter than water so  about 0.75l/kg.  

Sorry,  Paula, I don't have a standard tank any more, but that method will work .  Yer standard plastic 5  litre fuel can  holds a bit more, but filling station pumps are accurate - by statute!
John

PS well done with the stabiliser!  


That's a good idea.
I'm not sure i need that level of accuracy.
I'm also not liking the idea of running out in this weather!
Maybe if i wait until the needle points to E (it's super close now) and then fill it up. If i get 35 Ltrs in then i know that it's accurate enough to know i have a little reserve in the tank when it gets to E.
Posted by: Rosbif, December 27, 2017, 9:42pm; Reply: 943
The way I do it is top up at around every 150 miles. This is fine for my use,  so far haven't done that many miles per day for it to be a problem. During the summer there was a week when I was doing highish distances so filled up each evening. I do have a 10 litre plastic jerry can as a back up.

The standard Herald tank is smaller than the Vitesse one so keeping an eye on the needle is more important.
Posted by: RobPearce, December 27, 2017, 10:00pm; Reply: 944
When I had my first Vitesse, many years back, there was a period when the fuel sender float had a pinhole and would leak its air out until it sank, rendering the gauge useless. During that time I did, indeed, run out a couple of times. Fortunately I was within ten miles of a filling station both times so the reserve tap worked for me.
Posted by: Nick Jones, December 27, 2017, 11:03pm; Reply: 945
Quoted from Paula


Oh that's not much is it?
Must purchase a jerry can!


Generally enough in the UK where filling stations are (even now) quite plentiful.  In rural France however........ we've had some close calls!

Nick
Posted by: Pete Lewis, December 28, 2017, 8:03am; Reply: 946
If you top up when it gets down to a 1/4 you can go driving for over 50 years and never runnout

nothing clever but the gauge tells you , the brain engages and you top up .   Theres a plan

in all my years of driving only ran out once on a test run buying a new car
which was knocking on empty to start with,  sales guy had to leg it ,   red faced
Happy new year
pete
Posted by: Rosbif, December 28, 2017, 10:40am; Reply: 947
My wife had a Citroën C3 some years ago that she ran for 47000 kms without having to top it up. Mind you I did quite often  ;D
Posted by: Paula, December 28, 2017, 11:20am; Reply: 948
Well i made it home last night. The needle is now bang on E.
Should make for an interesting drive to the petrol station!
Who needs extreme sports!?
Posted by: JohnD, December 28, 2017, 1:37pm; Reply: 949
For a few pennies, you can buy a pump to extract what is left in the tank, scavenging as much as possible by probing around with the spout: https://www.ebay.co.uk/b/Vehicle-Fluid-Extractor-Pumps/179508/bn_1629906?rt=nc&_sop=15

What would be left would be insignificant, and would give a better-than-ballpark volume left at "E".
JOhn
Posted by: nang, December 28, 2017, 7:51pm; Reply: 950
And then you would pick up all the rubbish in the bottom of the tank and your car would stop anyway (eek)(eek)
Tony.
Posted by: poppyman, December 28, 2017, 10:29pm; Reply: 951
I have got to say, that all fuel pick up pipes pick up from the bottom of the tank ;)
If they only picked up from the top half......
Bar room mechanics and all that.
Posted by: JohnD, December 28, 2017, 11:55pm; Reply: 952
A fuel filter costs pennies too.
Posted by: Stuart Wilson, December 29, 2017, 1:54pm; Reply: 953
Quoted from Pete Lewis
If you top up when it gets down to a 1/4 you can go driving for over 50 years and never runnout

nothing clever but the gauge tells you , the brain engages and you top up .   Theres a plan

in all my years of driving only ran out once on a test run buying a new car
which was knocking on empty to start with,  sales guy had to leg it ,   red faced
Happy new year
pete



Agree, simple really. The fuel gauge doesn't work at all in my TR7 I've never run out in it and managed two RBRR, a week long trip in Ireland, a trip to Scotland and a trip to Essex. Yes I may top up more than I need to but not worth the risk.

I've also run out while on a test drive though it did die on a the petrol station forecourt. The salesman wasn't with us but was very red faced when we got back and produced the receipt for the fuel we'd had to buy.
Posted by: daver clasper, December 29, 2017, 4:54pm; Reply: 954
I guess a bendy stick could be used to get a rough idea
Posted by: Paula, December 30, 2017, 8:16pm; Reply: 955
Well i left it as long as i dare. It was well under E and i'd done 100 miles around town. I filled up and it only took 25 ltrs.
Also when i filled it up the needle went to about 3/4 of a tank.
I've ordered a 12v Voltage regulator to swap with the 10v one. I'll see how that goes!
Bendy stick on order!
Posted by: Paula, December 30, 2017, 8:18pm; Reply: 956
Quoted from Stuart Wilson



Agree, simple really. The fuel gauge doesn't work at all in my TR7 I've never run out in it and managed two RBRR, a week long trip in Ireland, a trip to Scotland and a trip to Essex. Yes I may top up more than I need to but not worth the risk.

I've also run out while on a test drive though it did die on a the petrol station forecourt. The salesman wasn't with us but was very red faced when we got back and produced the receipt for the fuel we'd had to buy.


I think it's because i fixed the speedo that i really want the 'full house' of all gauges working properly.
It's so close!
Posted by: Paula, December 30, 2017, 8:23pm; Reply: 957
Quoted from JohnD
For a few pennies, you can buy a pump to extract what is left in the tank, scavenging as much as possible by probing around with the spout: https://www.ebay.co.uk/b/Vehicle-Fluid-Extractor-Pumps/179508/bn_1629906?rt=nc&_sop=15

What would be left would be insignificant, and would give a better-than-ballpark volume left at "E".
JOhn


Nice!
Posted by: yorkshire_spam, December 30, 2017, 8:28pm; Reply: 958
Quoted from Paula
Well i left it as long as i dare. It was well under E and i'd done 100 miles around town. I filled up and it only took 25 ltrs.
Also when i filled it up the needle went to about 3/4 of a tank.
I've ordered a 12v Voltage regulator to swap with the 10v one. I'll see how that goes!
Bendy stick on order!


I think the sender might need "adjusting"?
Tank capacity is about 38 litres empty to full isn't it?
So by the sound of it your float on the end of the sender wire is unable to travel fully down?
My Spitfire had the opposite issue - showed 1/4 tank when it was empty, a bit of experimentation and bending of the sender "arm" soon sorted that out.
Posted by: Paula, December 30, 2017, 9:44pm; Reply: 959
Quoted from yorkshire_spam


I think the sender might need "adjusting"?
Tank capacity is about 38 litres empty to full isn't it?
So by the sound of it your float on the end of the sender wire is unable to travel fully down?
My Spitfire had the opposite issue - showed 1/4 tank when it was empty, a bit of experimentation and bending of the sender "arm" soon sorted that out.


That didn't occur to me at all!
Posted by: Paula, December 30, 2017, 10:06pm; Reply: 960
Quoted from Paula


That didn't occur to me at all!


So bend it down a little. The sender is only a year old and was fitted by the PO to fix the gauge problem (it didn't)
Posted by: yorkshire_spam, December 30, 2017, 10:21pm; Reply: 961
It's easier to sort when the tank is empty.....
I repeatedly removed, bent, refitted until the gauge read E with the float sitting close to the bottom of the tank, then hooked a wire round the float arm and pulled it up to the top of the tank and checked that the gauge read full.
Posted by: yorkshire_spam, December 30, 2017, 10:22pm; Reply: 962
Quoted from Paula


So bend it down a little. The sender is only a year old and was fitted by the PO to fix the gauge problem (it didn't)


Yes, as it's a new sender my money would be on adjustment curing the problem.
Posted by: Paula, December 31, 2017, 12:55am; Reply: 963
Quoted from yorkshire_spam
It's easier to sort when the tank is empty.....
I repeatedly removed, bent, refitted until the gauge read E with the float sitting close to the bottom of the tank, then hooked a wire round the float arm and pulled it up to the top of the tank and checked that the gauge read full.


Brilliant.
Thanks!
Posted by: daver clasper, December 31, 2017, 5:51pm; Reply: 964
Hi Paula.

That mileage around town I think is about 19 mpg. My 2 Litre Vit does about that, or maybe slightly less, though quite a lot of that mileage is while it's warming up, maybe it's normal, though bit pricey!.
Carbs have rebuilt with all new consumables.
Lot better on a run doing 50/60mph using overdrive, about 32mpg I think.
Are your plugs sooty when using in town do you know?. Mine are, with just a small area of brown. I understand they will run richer with constant stop/start journeys.
Dave
Posted by: Paula, January 1, 2018, 7:23pm; Reply: 965
Quoted from daver clasper
Hi Paula.

That mileage around town I think is about 19 mpg. My 2 Litre Vit does about that, or maybe slightly less, though quite a lot of that mileage is while it's warming up, maybe it's normal, though bit pricey!.
Carbs have rebuilt with all new consumables.
Lot better on a run doing 50/60mph using overdrive, about 32mpg I think.
Are your plugs sooty when using in town do you know?. Mine are, with just a small area of brown. I understand they will run richer with constant stop/start journeys.
Dave


I've found my one quite good on petrol.
I wouldn't know the figures but I know i can go to Brighton Nad back on a single tank. That seems ok.
Obviously in traffic it's very different, but it seems normal
Posted by: Paula, January 3, 2018, 11:16pm; Reply: 966
It's this threads 1st Birthday!!
Thank you so much for all the help over the year. It's made it possible to own a classic car as my only car and keep it going all year long and even take it down the Santa Pod drag strip!
I've thoroughly enjoyed owning, driving and working on it and i'm looking forward to learning more and more.
I'm sorry if i haven't replied to every comment, but sometimes i don't get the emails telling me you've posted. But i've read every word a few times and understood most of it.
I'm back out tomorrow messing with the fuel sender and the handbrake.
Expect more questions!
Thanks again.
Paula.
Xx
Posted by: Antonnick, January 4, 2018, 9:00am; Reply: 967
Quoted from Paula


I've found my one quite good on petrol.
I wouldn't know the figures but I know i can go to Brighton Nad back on a single tank. That seems ok.
Obviously in traffic it's very different, but it seems normal


Paula, definately the most interesting thread on the Forum and I am always happy to see the new posts.
On all my cars ( 5 of them, of which 3 are britisch classics) every time I tank up, I note the recorded km reading and then record the amounts on an Excel sheet. As a result my 13/60 which I got in March has done just under 2000 km till August ( since then it is being worked on ) at average 7,9 litre per 100km. That is not so far away from the Optimum 7,1 achieved by many with good engines, so I am quiter pleased.

Keep up the Posts and sharing your experiences !!

Antonia

Posted by: Rosbif, January 4, 2018, 10:16am; Reply: 968
Quoted from Antonnick


Paula, definately the most interesting thread on the Forum and I am always happy to see the new posts.
On all my cars ( 5 of them, of which 3 are britisch classics) every time I tank up, I note the recorded km reading and then record the amounts on an Excel sheet. As a result my 13/60 which I got in March has done just under 2000 km till August ( since then it is being worked on ) at average 7,9 litre per 100km. That is not so far away from the Optimum 7,1 achieved by many with good engines, so I am quiter pleased.

Keep up the Posts and sharing your experiences !!

Antonia



I do the same and the result is:
Over 3000 kms my average has been 7.5l/100 for my 13/60 convertible
Posted by: JohnD, January 4, 2018, 11:11am; Reply: 969
One eof the metrication measures that never crossed the channel is fuel consumption.    I need to translate Liters/100km to Miles per Gallon (and I'm a fervent metricator!)
Fortunatley Google is my friend and many sites will do this for me.
And 7.5L/100Km is 37.7mpg!

This is for 6 cylinders?   You guys must drive very, very carefully!   Most Vitesses do mid-20s.
John
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2018, 11:23am; Reply: 970
The siphon just arrived so i'm going to pop the sender out and have a wee bend of the float.
Posted by: Rosbif, January 4, 2018, 12:52pm; Reply: 971
Quoted from JohnD
One eof the metrication measures that never crossed the channel is fuel consumption.    I need to translate Liters/100km to Miles per Gallon (and I'm a fervent metricator!)
Fortunatley Google is my friend and many sites will do this for me.
And 7.5L/100Km is 37.7mpg!

This is for 6 cylinders?   You guys must drive very, very carefully!   Most Vitesses do mid-20s.
John


As we both said these for figures are for 13/60 s ;)
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 4, 2018, 1:10pm; Reply: 972
and when youve syphoned some fuel and the thing becomes redundant
i can see home brewed wine and beer putting it to good use in its afterlife  
the octane will add some novel flavours

Pete
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2018, 3:42pm; Reply: 973
Quoted from Pete Lewis
and when youve syphoned some fuel and the thing becomes redundant
i can see home brewed wine and beer putting it to good use in its afterlife  
the octane will add some novel flavours

Pete


Excellent idea
Posted by: JohnD, January 4, 2018, 5:00pm; Reply: 974
Pete,
You still celebrating Xmas & New Year?
Your last post lacked your usual coherence!

The "in" thing just now is "artisanal" gin, and that can have a 'Petrol' note to its aroma.
"If petrol were a perfume, it would smell like this. The man of my dreams would splash this on like aftershave."
http://ginandcrumpets.com/gin-tasting-sipsmith-london-dry-gin/

John
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2018, 5:28pm; Reply: 975
I need some gin today after crawling under the car trying to find the best place to adjust the slack on the handbrake cable. It all looks so easy when Edd China is doing it with his vehicle lift!
I think i'll try again tomorrow by making the adjustments at the back wheels.
I also ordered the wrong gasket for the fuel sender so that's put off until tomorrow now.
I gave up and just washed and polished him instead.
Posted by: poppyman, January 4, 2018, 6:05pm; Reply: 976
Quoted from Paula
I need some gin today after crawling under the car trying to find the best place to adjust the slack on the handbrake cable. It all looks so easy when Edd China is doing it with his vehicle lift!
I think i'll try again tomorrow by making the adjustments at the back wheels.
I also ordered the wrong gasket for the fuel sender so that's put off until tomorrow now.
I gave up and just washed and polished him instead.


I hope you adjust your rear brakes before adjusting the cable ;)
Cheers,
Tony.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 4, 2018, 6:10pm; Reply: 977
Sorry John.......         Hic,,,!!!!!




Pete
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 4, 2018, 6:24pm; Reply: 978
Some clues on rear brake and hand brake cable  settings

if you have no idea how these have been adjusted in the past its time to start from scratch
first jack car but support the rear suspension to hold the wheels up in their running  position.

Disconnect the cross car cable from the clevis on the back of the wheel cylinder.
now wind the square adjuster in till it locks the drum, try tightening some more to make sure the shoes have fully expanded
now reconnect and adjust the cable to just align the clevis holes , pop the pin back in
now undo the adjuster to free the drum to rotate by hand ,   then lower to the ground keeping the supension  at road height is important when setting the cable lengths.

If youre adventureous its worth also a check the rear shoe has been fitted correctly
the trailing shoe should have the square hole at the bottom, the front one has to be at the top as it takes the handbrake lever,

of you have the manual its also worth a look at the compensator lever angle and cable and hole
positions   nicely hidden above the prop shaft

see the gin sounds a better option
happy new year
pete
many trailing shoes do get fitted upside down.
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2018, 6:53pm; Reply: 979
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Some clues on rear brake and hand brake cable  settings

if you have no idea how these have been adjusted in the past its time to start from scratch
first jack car but support the rear suspension to hold the wheels up in their running  position.

Disconnect the cross car cable from the clevis on the back of the wheel cylinder.
now wind the square adjuster in till it locks the drum, try tightening some more to make sure the shoes have fully expanded
now reconnect and adjust the cable to just align the clevis holes , pop the pin back in
now undo the adjuster to free the drum to rotate by hand ,   then lower to the ground keeping the supension  at road height is important when setting the cable lengths.

If youre adventureous its worth also a check the rear shoe has been fitted correctly
the trailing shoe should have the square hole at the bottom, the front one has to be at the top as it takes the handbrake lever,

of you have the manual its also worth a look at the compensator lever angle and cable and hole
positions   nicely hidden above the prop shaft

see the gin sounds a better option
happy new year
pete
many trailing shoes do get fitted upside down.


Ok.
Got it!
I'll have a look at the shoes too.
Thanks!
Posted by: Paula, January 4, 2018, 7:15pm; Reply: 980
Do you make cable adjustments by rotating the square nut and the connector at the end?
Posted by: poppyman, January 4, 2018, 7:17pm; Reply: 981
Quoted from Pete Lewis
Some clues on rear brake and hand brake cable  settings

if you have no idea how these have been adjusted in the past its time to start from scratch
first jack car but support the rear suspension to hold the wheels up in their running  position.

Disconnect the cross car cable from the clevis on the back of the wheel cylinder.
now wind the square adjuster in till it locks the drum, try tightening some more to make sure the shoes have fully expanded
now reconnect and adjust the cable to just align the clevis holes , pop the pin back in
now undo the adjuster to free the drum to rotate by hand ,   then lower to the ground keeping the supension  at road height is important when setting the cable lengths.

If youre adventureous its worth also a check the rear shoe has been fitted correctly
the trailing shoe should have the square hole at the bottom, the front one has to be at the top as it takes the handbrake lever,

of you have the manual its also worth a look at the compensator lever angle and cable and hole
positions   nicely hidden above the prop shaft

see the gin sounds a better option
happy new year
pete
many trailing shoes do get fitted upside down.


You forgot to mention to make sure the cylinders are free on the back plate :)
Cheers,
Tony.


Posted by: JohnD, January 4, 2018, 7:30pm; Reply: 982
If I  may, never adjust hand brake with car upon stands.   The cable tightens  when you let it down, and you come to a grinding halt.   If you jack it up and pace your axle stands under the uprights, then the car 'thinks' its on the ground, but you can get under it!
Posted by: daver clasper, January 4, 2018, 9:19pm; Reply: 983
I adjusted my cable ends near the hubs a while ago and can't remember exactly how, but I think it's fairly obvious when you get there (the square nut and a lock nut I think). It's easier if the threads are clean and lubed so you can adjust with finger I seem to remember.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 4, 2018, 10:14pm; Reply: 984
Ues you have to rotate  the fork and the square nut to move the fork up, down the threaded cable end  often  a builds up of road dirt makes these often well seized up

and yes the wheel cylinder should slide in the back plate, and the piston must expand the shoes with careful press to make sure the hydraulics are not seized.

having found a local  vitesse with the wheel cyl retaining horseshoe clips been replaced with a cable tie,  !!!!  the brake drum was holding the cyl in place ,so much damage and you never tire of the suprises some bodgers get up to.
pete
Posted by: Paula, January 5, 2018, 5:16pm; Reply: 985
I didn't get to the brakes today, but i did have the fuel sender out.
It was already bent properly and with the sender at max the gauge with the 10v stabiliser was only at 3/4
Removing the voltage stabilizer allowed it to just reach full.
I'm not convinced by the sender to be honest but it had to go back in.
I metered it ot to 160 ohns at Empty and 35 ohms at full. But the gauge was jumping all over the place.
I'm going to try a 12v stabilizer and see if that's workable.
I've sent my original gauge off to Speedy Cables in Swansea for sevicing, so i'll probably have to do it all again when i get that back
Posted by: JohnD, January 5, 2018, 8:33pm; Reply: 986
Gauge jumping about?  That's a poor connection or a worn rheostat in the sender.

And iirc Triumph used 12V gauges in cars prior to ours, so if 12V gave yours a full reading,  I just wonder if your DPO reused an old guage?

John
Posted by: Paula, January 5, 2018, 10:33pm; Reply: 987
Quoted from JohnD
Gauge jumping about?  That's a poor connection or a worn rheostat in the sender.

And iirc Triumph used 12V gauges in cars prior to ours, so if 12V gave yours a full reading,  I just wonder if your DPO reused an old guage?

John


Sorry. My multi meter was jumping about.
I bought the gauge off ebay. So it would make sense that it's not the correct one. I'll try the 12v regulator with it. I'll probably have to change it back when the original gauge comes back from Speedy Cables.
I'm sure i'm making this harder than it should be.
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 6, 2018, 9:22am; Reply: 988
As a way to recognise early from late gauges
early had nomstabiliser , not needed , they have two coils to move the needle so are not voltage
sensitive the clue ..the needle jumps directly to its reading, so needles wag around on bumpy roads
and dont warm up to a reading its instant as soon as you switch on

later gauges with a real need for a stabilised voltage have  a bi metal strip wound with wire which heats the strip and this bends to move the needle,
the clue is the needle moves slowly up to its reading and can take a good few seconds to reach its reading   all nice and a damped slow operation.

its on a stabilised voltage as when driving the ignition voltage varies a lot this makes the needle reading to rise and fall with these changes    
pete
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2018, 10:40am; Reply: 989
The original one from the car was a coil type one, but the cheap one i bought is a bi Metal strip one.
I'm hoping that the 12v stabilizer will make the bi metal strip one work well enough until i get the original coil type one back from being refurbished.

I was hoping to save money and make the cheapy one work, but that hasn't worked well enough for a permanent fix.

Also i prefer the look of the original one.

So hopefully when the original coil type one comes back it'll work without the stabilizer.

Hopefully..................
Posted by: JohnD, January 6, 2018, 11:35am; Reply: 990
I'm confused, Paula.
Does a "12V" stabiliser provide a 'stabilised' 12V downstream?    As said before, the "10V" one gave 12V-0V-12V-0V- and so on, in a way that averaged a constant 10V, while the nominal 12v was variable, and the damped gauge was too slow to register the variation.
How does a "12V" stabiliser help?  If the average downstream voltage is 12V, then the guage will overread.

You weren't referring to the 12v-0V variation as 'jumping about' were you?
JOhn
Posted by: Pete Lewis, January 6, 2018, 2:18pm; Reply: 991
the early double coil gauges must not have a stabiliser
the senders for both systems are not interchangeable at all.
the stabilised gauge  temperature sender is GTR108  ....the Non Stabilised is 121997   you must not mix these up or you get realy  weid gauge readings

same applies to fuel sender  the early 205303 6 hole is not easy available but wont work stabilised gauges  if you have a baonet ring fuel sender it will never work a early iron/coil  gauge
you can fit a 6 hole sender in a bayonet ring tank by cutting the disc around the holes and fit with the  ring  but not reverse the plan

as early guages and senders are becomng rare its ok to add a voltage stabiliser and convert to bimetal gauges and senders
again all/both must be from the same design . inter mix and you have a headache for years of wrong readings

so its either all moveing iron  or all bimetal ,    any mixers are for the gin

Pete
Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2018, 2:20pm; Reply: 992
It's supplies a constant 12v if the voltage is above 12v is how i believe it works.  I think the electronic regulator is different to the old regulator.It's my attempt to make the gauge needle more accurate with a gauge that needs 12v to show full.

Once i get the original regulator back i should be prepared for anything! I can supply unregulated/10v/12v now just by changing the little box.

The jumping about was what i was experiencing on my multimeter when i was trying to measure the Ohms of the sender at empty and full.

Posted by: Paula, January 6, 2018, 2:39pm; Reply: 993
Quoted from Pete Lewis
the early double coil gauges must not have a stabiliser
the senders for both systems are not interchangeable at all.
the stabilised gauge  temperature sender is GTR108  ....the Non Stabilised is 121997   you must not mix these up or you get realy  weid gauge readings

same applies to fuel sender  the early 205303 6 hole is not easy available but wont work stabilised gauges  if you have a baonet ring fuel sender it will never work a early iron/coil  gauge
you can fit a 6 hole sender in a bayonet ring tank by cutting the disc around the holes and fit with the  ring  but not reverse the plan

as early guages and senders are becomng rare its ok to add a voltage stabiliser and convert to bimetal gauges and senders
again all/both must be from the same design . inter mix and you have a headache for years of wrong readings

so its either all moveing iron  or all bimetal ,    any mixers are for the gin

Pete


Ok I get it. This is what has happened:
The PO fitted a new 6 hole sender Part No.: 213411
This didn't work with the original coil gauge (ran backwards and well off)
I bought a (probably incorrect) BI Metal strip gauge off ebay for £5 and a 10v voltage regulator that worked but was reading too low on the gauge
I made a 12v regulator that works much better with the £5 Bi Metal strip one.
I've sent the original gauge off to be serviced.

sounds like even when i get the original gauge back it still wont work with the sender in the tank and one that will is going to be hard to find.
Maybe i'll ring the guys at Speedy cables and see if they have one? or a the ability to make one...






Posted by: Lumber, January 6, 2018, 6:25pm; Reply: 994
For what it's worth I used a Spiyda Gauge Matcher bought off ebay for £50, solved my issues when all dash gauges changed to Smiths Electronic Type.

Willie. (Ex T6 owner)
Posted by: glang, January 6, 2018, 7:37pm; Reply: 995
Hi Paula, have a look at this company for replacement moving coil sender units. Expensive but this one looks like the real item although the float rod might need setting up for your application. Theres also an good download on testing both the sender and gauge...

https://www.holden.co.uk/displayproduct.asp?sg=2&pgCode=070&sgName=Hardware&pgName=Gauges&agCode=0621&agName=Fuel+Tank+Senders&pCode=070.236
Posted by: daver clasper, January 7, 2018, 11:08am; Reply: 996
Spitfire Graveyard, Spitzbitze, Chioc Doig might have a secondhand part if that's any use?
Posted by: Paula, January 7, 2018, 11:49am; Reply: 997
Quoted from glang
Hi Paula, have a look at this company for replacement moving coil sender units. Expensive but this one looks like the real item although the float rod might need setting up for your application. Theres also an good download on testing both the sender and gauge...

https://www.holden.co.uk/displayproduct.asp?sg=2&pgCode=070&sgName=Hardware&pgName=Gauges&agCode=0621&agName=Fuel+Tank+Senders&pCode=070.236


Ooooooooooo That's interesting
Posted by: Paula, January 7, 2018, 11:50am; Reply: 998
Quoted from daver clasper
Spitfire Graveyard, Spitzbitze, Chioc Doig might have a secondhand part if that's any use?


Worth a go
Posted by: Paula, January 9, 2018, 11:55am; Reply: 999
Quoted from daver clasper
Spitfire Graveyard, Spitzbitze, Chioc Doig might have a secondhand part if that's any use?


Chic Doig £15.
Done!
Posted by: Paula, January 14, 2018, 6:19pm; Reply: 1000
I think i need to buy a cover. There's a few times this year i'll be leaving hm for a month without moving and i'd rather get a cover than let him fill up with water
I've seen some posts from 2006 on here recommending the Hamilton Classics one http://www.hamiltonclassic.co.uk/ it's about £180
Is this still a good choice or is there a newer option now?
I could spend up to £200 max? Happy to spend less!
Posted by: JohnD, January 14, 2018, 6:58pm; Reply: 1001
Can you find a lock-up garage to rent to keep it in?
Posted by: Paula, January 14, 2018, 8:53pm; Reply: 1002
Quoted from JohnD
Can you find a lock-up garage to rent to keep it in?


I looked and in London it's unbelievably expensive
Posted by: Rosbif, January 15, 2018, 9:39am; Reply: 1003
I bought a monsoon car cover from Hamilton. It resists the cats climbing on it and their claws quite well, doesn't damage the paint work and the straps hold it in place.
HOWEVER the seems repeatedly gave way and I have just about glued them all since February 2015 when it was bought. I use a hot glue gun and then they hold. I did report the shortcoming of the design to them and suggested the seems should be glued & sewn I didn't even get a reply.

Would I recommend this cover ? Not sure. If seems were made stronger then I would.

I ensure an air gap between the cover and the car with a couple of foam pipe insulation 'tubes' across the roof to reduce condensation and I leave the windows slightly open.

Hope these comments help.
Posted by: daver clasper, January 15, 2018, 9:55am; Reply: 1004
Hamilton seems a good bet from what I've gathered. Will probably get one when my current one gives up the the ghost.

I think it's UV light that mainly deteriorates them, so if you can park on side of road where there is less, then prob an idea.

A lot of folk say you need a garage (ideal if it's dry and ventilated, a lot aren't), but I have a decent cover and it's been fine, with not too much condensation. I leave door windows open a bit  for vent and interior has stayed very dry. If you are able to park up on the kerb, then this helps with through air underneath.
Posted by: Paula, January 15, 2018, 1:10pm; Reply: 1005
Oh these look rather nice
http://www.coveryourcar.co.uk/cielo.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=52&v=ndN68ezdYN8
Proper fitted mirrors and all for the same price
Posted by: nang, January 16, 2018, 2:00am; Reply: 1006
My only objection to car covers is that on a windy day they can scratch the car.
Tony.
Posted by: Paula, January 16, 2018, 10:39am; Reply: 1007
Quoted from nang
My only objection to car covers is that on a windy day they can scratch the car.
Tony.


That's why i held off, But the paint is not 100% and there are some rust spots coming through. I decided it was worth the risk. It's got about 3" of polish on it anyway!  ;D

Posted by: Paula, January 16, 2018, 10:44am; Reply: 1008
I went for this one in the end.

http://www.coveryourcar.co.uk/cielo.html

It's fleece lined and i liked the proper fitting including wing mirrors.
The company got in touch and asked that i measured from the front to the wing mirrors. They also asked for some pictures. (no problem there! ;D)

I also sent the dimensions from the manual too, but was told they have already made a pattern from an actual Vitesse so only needed the mirror position to confirm the placement of them.

Very impressed so far! I'll let you know with pictures once it's made.
Posted by: poppyman, January 16, 2018, 12:05pm; Reply: 1009
That cover looks brilliant ;) Almost as good as some resprays i've seen ;D ;D

Cheers, Tony.
Posted by: Antonnick, January 16, 2018, 7:30pm; Reply: 1010
This must be the newest Modell for the Saudi Arabian market----introducing the.....

Triumph Burka

Posted by: poppyman, January 16, 2018, 9:26pm; Reply: 1011
They also do them for Dogs ;)

Its called a "BARKA" 8)
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